1st European Summit on CO2-based Aviation Fuels

sustainable aviation

Using CO2 as a raw material for aviation fuels is the cool new thing on the way to low-emission air transport

 

1st European Summit on CO2-based Aviation Fuels, 23 March 2020, Cologne (Germany) on Sustainable Strategies & Solutions for Cleaner Air Transport

 

The vital question for the future of aviation is: how do we tackle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from air transport and their serious impact on the climate? There are not many technological options available. Electric-driven aviation is, for the next decades, only suitable for short distance flights. The use of bio-based kerosene is confronted by NGOs as putting unacceptable pressure on natural resources, such as land and biodiversity. It is also hampered by quality and standards issues for different biomass sources and conversion processes.

First life cycle assessments show that especially the land and water footprints of e-fuels are much lower compared to bio-based aviation fuels (see figure on land use), and the huge demand cannot be covered by biogenic side streams or biowaste. The potential for fuels based on energy from solar, wind and hydro power and CO2 is by far bigger than for biofuels.

Still, there are many questions to be answered. What is the best technology? How to provide the most cost-efficient renewable energy, hydrogen and CO2? Where are the best locations for the production? Which possible business partners are willing to invest in a PtL production plant now? What are the best strategies to implement CO2-based aviation fuels? What about the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme (CORSIA) and the European Emissions Trading System (ETS)? How to ensure aviation standards are met? Which airlines are willing to use sustainable aviation fuels (SAFs), even if they are initially more expensive than fossil fuels? What is required politically in terms of regulations and international support?

The “1st European Summit on CO2-based Aviation Fuels”, 23 March, 2020, Cologne, Germany, is for decision makers in policy, organisations, airlines and the respective industries. You are cordially invited by the International Association for Sustainable Aviation (IASA) and nova-Institute to take part in this essential summit.

The invited speakers will come from the fields of policy, aviation industry, environmental protection and technology development. The following speakers have already confirmed their participation: Alexandru Iordan, SAF+ Consortium (Canada), Gunnar Holen, Nordic Blue Crude (Norway), Harry Lehmann, German Environmental Agency (UBA) (Germany), Juha Lehtonen, VTT (Finland) and Prof. Roland Dittmeyer, KIT (Germany).

AIR FRANCE PLANS FLIGHTS FROM SAN FRANCISCO FUELED WITH SUSTAINABLE AVIATION FUEL

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Air France and Shell have signed a memorandum of understanding signaling their intent to fuel flights from San Francisco International Airport using a blend of conventional and sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) with effect from 1 June 2020.

This collaboration between Air France, World Energy, and Shell exemplifies what the industry needs; a supply of SAF that is mature enough to be integrated into airlines’ daily operations.The SAF is notably made from inedible waste fats and oils. This RSB-certified alternative fuel meets strict sustainability standards and can be delivered via the airport’s hydrant system. The airline anticipates that this initiative will help save approximately 6,000 tons of CO2 over a period of 16 months.Air France has long advocated the creation of a viable sustainable aviation fuel sector. A pioneer in its use on commercial flights, Air France first initiated experiments as early as 2014 and has since heavily invested in innovation, working hand-in-hand with researchers.

This is another example of the airline’s commitment to reducing its environmental footprint at every step of the value chain. Its sustainable development agenda for 2030 involves cutting CO2emissions by 50%, which Air France notably aims to achieve by investing in fuel-efficient aircraft.

Anne Rigail, CEO of Air France: “Sustainable Aviation fuels are integral to our sustainability approach. They constitute an immediate concrete response to our environmental challenges and we must encourage their production. This initiative in California demonstrates that when states set up incentive mechanisms, production picks up and airlines are given the means to take action. We as a community must look at this as an example and duplicate it around the world, notably at home, in France.”

Anna Mascolo, Vice President Shell Aviation: “Along with new technologies and offsets, sustainable aviation fuels have a huge role to play in reducing emissions from air travel. With urgent action and industry collaboration it is possible to fly and emit less. However, we are still at the beginning of the journey with significant opportunity to increase the supply of sustainable aviation fuel and replicate successes such as this globally. At Shell we are committed to working with the industry towards a more sustainable aviation industry. Commitments like this from Air France can only help accelerate this journey, giving producers the assurance to invest in building refinery capacity and enabling us to develop the supply infrastructure required.”

Bryan Sherbacow, Chief Commercial Officer, World Energy: “We are proud to enable Air France and Shell to deliver a low-carbon fuel solution to their aviation customers. The route to widespread availability and use of sustainable aviation fuel is awareness and supportive policy similar to that of California. This important collaboration elevates visibility with both international consumers and legislators.”

Source: Air France

Aim for 1 Billion Passengers to Fly on Sustainable Fuel Flights by 2025

sustainable aviation fuel

IATA set out an aim for one billion passengers to fly on flights powered by sustainable aviation fuel by 2025.

26 February 2018

Geneva – The International Air transport Association (IATA) set out an aim  for one billion passengers to fly on flights powered by a mix of jet fuel and sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) by 2025. This aspiration was identified on the tenth anniversary of the first flight to blend sustainable aviation fuel and ordinary jet fuel.

On 24 February 2008, a Virgin Atlantic Boeing 747 flew from London to Amsterdam with sustainable aviation fuel in one of its engines. The flight demonstrated the viability of drop-in biofuels, which can be blended with traditional jet fuel, using existing airport infrastructure. A flight completely powered by sustainable fuel has the potential to reduce the carbon emissions of that flight by up to 80%.

“The momentum for sustainable aviation fuels is now unstoppable. From one flight in 2008, we passed the threshold of 100,000 flights in 2017, and we expect to hit one million flights during 2020. But that is still just a drop in the ocean compared to what we want to achieve. We want 1 billion passengers to have flown on a SAF-blend flight by 2025. That won’t be easy to achieve. We need governments to set a framework to incentivize production of SAF and ensure it is as attractive to produce as automotive biofuels,” said Alexandre de Juniac, IATA’s Director General and CEO.

The push to increase uptake of SAF is being driven by the airline industry’s commitment to achieve carbon-neutral growth from 2020 and to cut net carbon emissions by 50% compared to 2005. A number of airlines, including Cathay Pacific, FedEx Express, JetBlue, Lufthansa, Qantas, and United, have made significant investments by forward-purchasing 1.5 billion gallons of SAF. Airports in Oslo, Stockholm, Brisbane and Los Angeles are already mixing SAF with the general fuel supply.

sustainable aviation fuel

On the present uptake trajectory it is anticipated that half a billion passengers will have flown on a SAF-blend powered flight by 2025. But if governments, through effective policy, help the sustainable fuel industry to scale-up its production, it is possible that one billion passengers could experience an SAF flight by 2025. The steps needed to deliver this include:

  • Allowing SAF to compete with automotive biofuels through equivalent or magnified incentives
  • Loan guarantees and capital grants for production facilities
  • Supporting SAF demonstration plants and supply chain research and development
  • Harmonized transport and energy policies, coordinated with the involvement of agriculture and military departments.

Acknowledging that some sources of biofuels for land transport have been criticized for their environmental credentials, de Juniac emphasized strongly the determination of the industry to only use truly sustainable sources for its alternative fuels.

“The airline industry is clear, united and adamant that we will never use a sustainable fuel that upsets the ecological balance of the planet or depletes its natural resources,” he said.

Source: IATA (www.iata.org)