Boeing’s 787-10 Dreamliner Cleared for Commercial Service by FAA

sustainable aviation

25 % better fuel per seat and emissions than current airplanes

Everett, Wash., Jan. 22, 2018: Boeing announced today the 787-10 Dreamliner received an amended type certificate (ATC) from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), clearing the airplane for commercial service.

The awarding of ATC caps a successful flight test program that began in March 2017 and involved three flight test airplanes that accumulated about 900 test hours. Boeing’s flight test program team took the airplanes through a series of tests to confirm the airplane’s handling, systems and overall performance met internal requirements and certification standards to ensure safety of flight.

Other aviation regulatory agencies are expected to follow the FAA’s lead and certify the airplane before it enters service.

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is a family of super-efficient airplanes with new passenger-pleasing features. As a stretch of the 787-9, the 787-10 retains over 95 percent commonality while adding seats and cargo capacity, setting a new benchmark for fuel efficiency and operating economics at 25 percent better fuel per seat and emissions than the airplanes it will replace. The airplane can fly 330 passengers, in a typical two-class configuration, up to 6,430 nautical miles (11,910 km).

To date, Boeing has over 170 orders for the 787-10 from nine customers worldwide. First delivery is expected to Singapore Airlines in the first half of 2018.

sustainable aviation

Boeing Flight Test & Evaluation, Boeing Field, Seattle, Flight Test, 787-10 Dreamliner, ZC001, Test 004-04, Flutter, puffy clouds, Eastern washington

Source: Boeing

Boeing: Airlines in Middle East expected to need 3,350 new airplanes over next 20 years

International Association for Sustainable Aviation

Growing airport hubs, diverse business models and infrastructure investments driving regional demand

Dubai, November 13, 2017: Boeing forecasts that airlines in the Middle East will need 3,350 new airplanes over the next 20 years, valued at an estimated $730 billion. Boeing presented its 2017 Current Market Outlook (CMO) for the region during the Dubai Airshow.

“Traffic growth in the Middle East is expected to grow at 5.6 percent annually during the next 20 years,” said Randy Tinseth, vice president of Marketing, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “The fact that 85 percent of the world’s population lives within an eight-hour flight of the Arabian Gulf, coupled with robust business models and investment in infrastructure, allows carriers in the Middle East to channel traffic through their hubs and offer one-stop service between many cities.”

Twin-aisle airplanes are expected to make up nearly 50 percent of the new airplanes in the Middle East, and more than 70 percent of the value at $520 billion. Both percentages are significantly higher than the global average. The strong long-term demand for widebody airplanes was reinforced at the show as Emirates Airline announced a commitment to purchase 40 Boeing 787-10 Dreamliners in a deal valued at $15.1 billion at current list prices.

More than half of the total deliveries in the Middle East will be single-aisle airplanes such as the 737 MAX. Operators in the region will need 1,770 single-aisle airplanes valued at $190 billion, driven by the growth of low-cost carriers.

Around the world, Boeing has forecasted long-term demand for 41,030 new airplanes, valued at $6.1 trillion. These new airplanes will replace older, less (fuel) efficient airplanes, benefiting airlines and passengers and stimulating growth in emerging markets and innovation in airline business models.

International Association for Sustainable Aviation

Boeing 777-300ER showing the colors of Emirates
Photo: Boeing

For more information on Boeing’s Current Market Outlook please visit:
http://www.boeing.com/cmo

Source: Boeing

Boeing Raises Forecast for New Airplane Demand in China

737 MAX 10

20 year outlook projects 7,200+ new airplanes, valued at $1.1 trillion

Beijing, Sept. 6, 2017: Boeing projects a demand for 7,240 new airplanes in the country over the next 20 years valued at nearly $1.1 trillion dollars. Boeing’s latest annual China Current Market Outlook (CMO) was released today in Beijing, with total airplane demand rising 6.3 percent over last year’s forecast. “China’s continuous economic growth, significant investment in infrastructure, growing middle-class and evolving airline business models support this long-term outlook,” said Randy Tinseth, vice president of Marketing, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “China’s fleet size is expected to grow at a pace well above the world average, and almost 20 percent of global new airplane demand will be from airlines based in China.”

Single-aisle airplanes continue to be the foundation of domestic and regional fleets in China. Boeing sees the need for 5,420 new single-aisle airplanes through 2036, accounting for 75 percent of the total new deliveries. Full-service airlines and low-cost carriers have been adding new single-aisle airplanes and expanding new point-to-point services to cater for both leisure and business travel demand in China and throughout Asia.

Tinseth said the backlog from Chinese customers demonstrates that the new 737 MAX8 remains at the heart of the single-aisle market.

Boeing forecasts the widebody fleet over the next 20 years will require 1,670 new airplanes. Airlines continue to shift to small and medium widebody airplanes for long-haul expansion and flexibility. Primary demand for very large widebodies going forward will be in the freighter market.

“China’s outbound travel market continues its rapid growth toward 200 million passengers annually,” said Tinseth. “With new technologies, superior capabilities and advanced efficiency, the 787 and 777X families will play a key role in supporting the growth of China’s long-haul market.”

 

New Airplane China Deliveries Through 2036

Airplane type Seats Total deliveries Dollar value
Regional Jets 90 and below 150 $10B
Single-aisle 90-230 5,420 $570B
Small wide-body 200-300 940 $260B
Medium/large wide-body 300 and above 550 $190B
Freighter widebody 180 $60B
Total ———– 7,240
(18% of world total)
$1.09T
(18% of world total)

Worldwide, Boeing projects the need for 41,030 new commercial airplanes over the next 20 years valued at $6.1 trillion dollars. The complete forecast is available at www.boeing.com/cmo.

Today, Boeing jets are the mainstay of China’s air travel and cargo system. More than 50 percent of all the commercial jetliners operating in China are Boeing airplanes.

Meanwhile, China has a component role on every current Boeing commercial airplane model – the Next-Generation 737, 747, 767, 777, as well as the world’s most technologically advanced airplane, the 787 Dreamliner. Over 9,000 Boeing airplanes fly throughout the world with integrated China-built parts and assemblies.

737 MAX 10

Boeing 737 MAX 10 showing the colors of Xiamen Airlines

Source:  Boeing

Boeing Forecasts Demand for 3,860 New Airplanes in Southeast Asia; 1,020 in Oceania 

Manila, November  18, 2016: Boeing used the 60th annual ‘Assembly of the Association of Asia Pacific Airlines’  in Manila to  present its latest ‘Current Market Outlook’ for the Southeast Asia and Oceania regions. Over the next 20 years, the company forecasts a demand for 3,860 new airplanes, valued at $565 billion, in Southeast Asia; while an investment of $160 billion for 1,020 new airplanes is expected in the Oceania region.

“Southeast Asia and Oceania remain important markets for Boeing as airlines continue to add capacity, modernize their fleets and shift their business models to adapt to this competitive market,” said Dinesh Keskar, senior vice president of Asia Pacific and India Sales, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “While we see the majority of the demand being for single-aisle airplanes such as the 737 MAX, fuel-efficient twin-aisle airplanes such as the 787 Dreamliner and the 777X will also be needed, enabling airlines to profitably open new routes, never before possible.”

The annual report projects that more than 75 percent of the airplanes needed in both regions will be for single-aisle airplanes, as they continue to see a rise in the number of low cost carriers as well as strong annual traffic, with growth rates of 6.4 percent and 4.7 percent, for Southeast Asia and Oceania, respectively.

Worldwide, Boeing projects a demand for 39,620 new airplanes, over the next two decades. Boeing’s ‘Current Market Outlook’ is the longest running jet forecast and regarded as the most comprehensive analysis of the aviation industry. The full report can be found at www.boeing.com/cmo.

Source: Boeing

Successful Noise Reduction at Heathrow Airport

‘Fly Quiet’ league table ranks 50 airlines on noise

Heathrow, November 15, 2016:  A new report released by Heathrow ranks British Airways’ short-haul fleet as the quietest flying to the west London airport. The latest Heathrow Fly Quiet league table also shows the impact of the airport’s policies incentivizing airlines to fly their cleanest and quietest aircraft to Heathrow as the number of super-quiet Airbus A350 flights doubled and Boeing 787 Dreamliner flights have risen by 19 per cent.

Qatar Airways last week became the third carrier to fly the super-quiet Airbus plane, which made its debut last year, joining Finnair and Ethiopian on the London route, increasing the daily number of A350 flights to six. The A350’s noise footprint is about 50% smaller than its predecessor models and is contributing to a better noise environment for local communities. Twenty-one of Heathrow’s airlines have ordered A350s.

Meanwhile, Boeing 787 Dreamliner flights increased from 6,300 to 7,500 over the three-month period to October.

British Airways short-haul – the airport’s biggest – is also the quietest fleet flying into Heathrow, with the UK’s flag carrier reporting exceptional performance thanks to noise-reducingenhancements to its fleet of Airbus A320 planes and operating procedures that take noise over the ground into consideration.

Singapore Airlines climbed 21 places to 19th thanks to its use of quieter aircraft and improved procedures.

super-quiet Airbus A350

Due to the ‘Fly Quiet’ program super-quiet Airbus A350 flights doubled at Heathrow airport in Q3, 2016

Commenting on the report, Heathrow’s Chief Executive, John Holland-Kaye said: “The Fly Quiet program helps airlines improve their noise performance and provides incentives for them to fly their newest, quietest aircraft to Heathrow, helping the airport be a better neighbor.  “We will continue to work with airlines and local communities to be a leader in sustainable aviation.”

Source: Heathrow Airport

Heathrow on Track to Become Free of Noisiest Aircraft

Latest ‘Fly Quiet’ league shows increase in use of quieter aircraft types

Heathrow, June 21, 2016:  Virgin Atlantic’s replacement of its old 747-400’s with top of the range Boeing 787 have improved the airline’s noise record over January to March of this year, the latest ‘Fly Quiet League’ table shows.  Air Canada, Air India, British Airways and Qatar have also significantly increased their use of 787 Dreamliners on their Heathrow routes this past year. This has contributed to an overall 6% improvement in the total league table score tracking the use of quieter aircraft at Heathrow.

As this trend shows, Heathrow is on track to become the first large European airport to be completely free of “Chapter 3” aircraft,  the oldest and noisiest classification, due in part to the heavy fees airlines pay to land these planes at Heathrow. On average, airlines pay ten times more to fly Chapter 3 planes to Heathrow than they pay for the quietest aircraft, like the Dreamliner.

The last three months have also shown some improvement in airlines adhering to the noise preferential routes in the skies around Heathrow as set by Government –  or what is known as “track keeping”.  Air France and Aegean moved up 7 places because of their track keeping while SN Brussels’s track keeping has improved its score from “amber” ratings to “green.”

As some elements of the Fly Quiet league, for example CDA, are influenced by seasonal variables, comparisons between the same quarterly periods of year to year are particularly useful.

The eleventh Fly Quiet table rated the top 50 airlines operating at Heathrow (by number of flights per quarter) according to six noise related criteria. The airlines received a red/amber/green rating for each criterion, as well as an overall score that allows them to understand how they are performing in relation to other airlines.

 

Metrics of  the Fly Quiet League Table

Airlines were consulted on which metrics would be used to compile the Fly Quiet league table. Each metric will be assigned a “RAG” (Red, Amber, Green) status based on the performance bands set for that indicator. As a result operators towards the top of the table will typically have more ‘green scores’ than those towards the bottom. Because scores fluctuate within a band it is possible for an airline with all green scores to sit further down the table, than those with amber or red scores. Individual metric scores will not be published. The ratings are corrected for the number of flights flown by each airline so airlines with more flights are not penalized.

  1. Noise quota count/seat/movement:This is a relative noise “efficiency” metric which scores the noise efficiency of an operator’s fleet, recognizing that whilst larger aircraft tend to be noisier they also carry more passengers. It is calculated by dividing the sum of QC for arrivals and departures by the aggregate seat capacity and total movements by airline of those flights. This provides a balance between a QC/seat or QC/movement metric which will tend to overly bias long haul or short haul carriers respectively.

A ‘red’ score is awarded if the QC/seat/movement indicator exceeds 0.000022. An ‘amber’ score is awarded if the score is better than the minimum performance targets above but greater than 0.00001.

  1. Noise Certification:Each aircraft is required to have a noise certificate which can be used to determine its relative performance against ICAO noise performance targets (Chapter 3 and Chapter 4). This allows to recognize “best in class” and compare performance across different types. An average ‘per movement’ Chapter number value is calculated for each airline, which favors the airlines operating best-in-class, modern, quieter aircraft more frequently.

The minimum performance target in these metrics for the purpose of the Fly Quiet program is Chapter 4. If the average score of an airline’s fleet operated to and from Heathrow is less than the Chapter 4 equivalent a ‘red’ score is awarded. A ‘green’ score is awarded if the average noise certification score of an airline is better than the equivalent of Chapter 4 base charging category (see our Conditions of Use www.heathrowairport.com).

  1. Arrival Operations:Continuous Descent Approach (CDA violations). CDA involves aircraft maintaining a steady angle of approach when landing at the airport, as opposed to stepped approaches which involve prolonged periods of level flight. This reduces noise because it requires less engine thrust and keeps the aircraft higher for longer. By following a CDA on arrival, the noise on the ground can be reduced by up to 5dBA in areas away from the final approach paths. The purpose of the indicator is to capture the non-CDA arrivals and so potentially reduce the disturbance caused.

The minimum performance target for the CDA compliance is set for 55% for the Fly Quiet program. An airline achieving this but not exceeding 75% gets an ‘amber’ score; CDA compliance of 75% and more means a ‘green’ score is awarded.

  1. Departure Operations: Track deviations on departure (TK violations). Aircraft are required to stay within ‘noise preferential routes’ (NPRs) – 3km wide tracks in the sky, designated by the Government to route aircraft away from more densely populated areas as far as possible – until they reach 4000ft. The track deviations indicator is expressed as the proportion of departures that flew outside the NPRs below 4000ft. The purpose of the indicator is to capture the aircraft which operate outside of these boundaries and so potentially cause unexpected noise disturbance. Instances where this occurs for reasons outside of the airline’s control are excluded for the calculation.

The minimum performance target for the track keeping compliance is set for 85% for the Fly Quiet program. An airline achieving this standard but not exceeding 90% gets an ‘amber’ score; CDA compliance of 90% and more means a ‘green’ score is awarded.

  1. Night time Operations 1: Arrivals prior to 04:30. There is a voluntary arrangement that aircraft scheduled to land between 04:30 and 06:00 will not land prior to 04:30. This is a very sensitive time and issue for local community groups. The purpose of this indicator is to measure adherence to the operator schedules. It is measured as the number of flights arriving before 04:30 as a proportion of the total number of arrivals for the airline.

Green: no infringements, Red: one or more infringements

  1. Night time Operations 2: unscheduled arrivals prior to 06:00. Arrivals scheduled to land after 06:00 should not land before then unless there are dispensing circumstances (e.g. Low visibility conditions). This is also a very sensitive time and issue for local community groups. The purpose of this indicator is to measure adherence to the operator schedules. It is measured as the number of unscheduled flights arriving between 04:30 and 06:00 as a proportion of the total number of arrivals for the airline.

Green: no infringements, Red: one or more infringements

 

Some of the world’s toughest rules and regulations

As metrics 5 & 6 are limited in terms of the airlines they could affect but are nonetheless important issues for community stakeholders these have been weighted lower than the remaining 4 so as to not result in dramatic fluctuations in an airlines ranking. Instances where metrics 5 & 6 occur for reasons outside of the airline’s control are excluded for the calculation.

The set of indicators is designed to address the aims of the program whilst giving the operators the opportunity to improve their ranking by short-term (i.e. operational/tactical) or long-term (e.g. fleet planning) measures.

Heathrow has some of the world’s toughest rules and regulations on noise which has played a major role in driving developments in quieter aircraft technology. Limits and restrictions in force at Heathrow, and in particular those that apply to flights at night, promote the use of ‘best in class’ aircraft. These incentives have contributed to more of the quietest planes being used at Heathrow – on average the aircraft that airlines use are 15 per cent quieter than the total global fleets of those airlines.

Heathrow on Track to Become Free of Noisiest Aircraft

Virgin Atlantic’s replacement of its old 747-400’s with top of the range Boeing 787 have improved the airline’s noise record Photo: Heathrow Airport

For more information on Heathrow’s Blueprint for noise reduction please see: http://www.heathrow.com/noise/making-heathrow-quieter/our-noise-strategy/blueprint-for-noise-reduction

Source: Heathrow Airport

Boeing: New Environmental Report Released

Environmental progress despite record deliveries

Chicago, June 3, 2016: Boeing’s progress in reducing its environmental footprint and helping build a more sustainable future for the aerospace industry are highlighted in the company’s 2016 Environment Report, released today. “As we enter our second century of business, we recognize that strong environmental performance is necessary to ensuring a healthy planet and our long-term business success,” said Ursula English, vice president of Environment, Health & Safety. “We’re making good progress, even as Boeing delivers record numbers of aircraft and builds new facilities to support strong business growth.”

The 2016 Environment Report highlights include:

  • Boeing operations reduced green-house gas emissions, solid waste to landfill, water intake and hazardous waste generation by between 6 and 11 percent in 2015
  • Twenty percent of Boeing’s workforce—30,000 employees—choose alternative commuting methods, reducing vehicle emissions
  • The 787 Dreamliner family improved fuel efficiency and reduced carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 20 to 25 percent compared to airplanes they replace
  • The 737 MAX will generate a 40 percent smaller noise footprint over today’s single-aisle airplanes
  • Boeing’s ecoDemonstrator Program has tested more than 50 innovative technologies designed to improve the efficiency and performance of Boeing products

To read the full 2016 Environment Report, please visit Boeing.com.

Boeing: New Environmental Report Released

Less fuel consumption, less emissions: The new Boeing 737MAX-family will improve fuel efficiency by 20 to 25 percent compared to airplanes they replace

Source: Boeing

Boeing 787-10 Dreamliner Begins Major Assembly

Everett, Wash., March 15, 2016: Major assembly of the first Boeing 787-10 Dreamliner is underway, the latest major milestone in the development of the newest member of the super-efficient 787 family. Boeing partner Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. began installing the circular frames into the midforward section of the fuselage on March 14, a full two weeks ahead of schedule.

“Beginning major assembly early underscores the commitment, discipline and performance of the entire Boeing and partner team worldwide,” said Ken Sanger, vice president of 787 Airplane Development, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “We are taking all the right steps to ensure we integrate the 787-10 into the production system smoothly.”

As a straightforward stretch of the 787-9, which entered service in 2014, Boeing designed the 787-10 for both superior efficiency and maximum commonality. Ninety-five percent of the design and build of the 787-10 and 787-9 will be identical, reducing complexity, cost and risk across the entire production system while providing operational benefits to customers.

The 787-10, which will undergo final assembly at Boeing South Carolina in North Charleston, will set a new benchmark in efficiency when deliveries begin in 2018. With a robust range capability covering more than 90 percent of the world’s twin-aisle routes, the 787-10 will deliver 25 percent better fuel use and emissions than the airplanes it will replace. To date, the 787-10 has won 153 orders from nine leading customers around the world, accounting for 13 percent of all 787 orders.

Boeing 787-10

Boeing partner Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. began installing the circular frames into the midforward section of the 787-10 fuselage on March 14, a full two weeks ahead of schedule

Source: Boeing

Boeing: Milestone for More Sustainability

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

ANA becomes the world’s first airline to reach 100,000th Dreamliner Flight

Seattle, January 11, 2016: Boeing and ANA (All Nippon Airways) today celebrated the airline’s 100,000th revenue flight with the 787 Dreamliner during a gate ceremony at Sea-Tac International Airport. The milestone marks yet another record for ANA as it becomes the first airline in the world to reach 100,000 Boeing 787 flights.

“The 787 Dreamliner has played an important role especially in forming the backbone of our international fleet,” said Osamu Shinobe, president and CEO, ANA. “Reaching the 100,000th revenue flight milestone with the 787 Dreamliner is a significant milestone for ANA. As the largest customer of the 787, we look to forward to introducing the entire family of Dreamliners into our fleet as we aim to celebrate another 100,000 flights and beyond.”

ANA was the launch customer of the 787 Dreamliner family and in 2011 became the first airline to introduce the innovative airplane to passengers around the world. Since then, the fuel-efficient airplane has enabled ANA to launch new routes worldwide, including North America, Europe and Southeast Asia. With this milestone, ANA has accumulated approximately a quarter of all 787 revenue flights.

“We are honored to celebrate this important milestone with ANA, especially here in Seattle,” said Ray Conner, president and CEO, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “ANA is a valued Boeing customer and has been a tremendous partner on the 787 program. This milestone demonstrates the strength of our long-standing relationship and we look forward to celebrating many more milestones with ANA going forward.”

ANA operates the world’s largest Dreamliner fleet with 44 Boeing 787s, including both the 787-8 and the longer 787-9. The airline has 39 unfilled 787 orders, including for the longest and newest member of the 787 family, the 787-10, in addition to 20 777-9X airplanes.

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is a family of technologically advanced, super-efficient airplanes that bring big-jet ranges to the middle of the market. To date, the 787 has flown more than 75 million passengers on more than 350 routes around the world, including more than 90 new nonstop routes opened through its efficiency.

Source: Boeing

Boeing: Record Deliveries in 2015

Backlog with 5795 Unfilled Orders

 

Seattle, January 7, 2016: Boeing delivered 762 commercial airplanes in 2015, 39 more than the previous year and most ever for the company as it enters its centennial year.

“The Boeing team has worked hard to achieve strong performance,” said Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Ray Conner. “Our team did a fantastic job achieving higher deliveries and getting our products to our customers as quickly and efficiently as possible. This will continue to be our focus.”

In 2015, Boeing recorded 768 net orders, valued at $112.4 billion at current list prices. At year end, Boeing held 5,795 unfilled orders from customers worldwide.

“We had a solid year of orders in 2015, maintaining a strong, balanced backlog that will help ensure a steady stream of deliveries for years to come,” said Conner.

Worldwide demand for air travel has continued to be robust, said Randy Tinseth, Vice President, Marketing, Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

“Global passenger traffic in most key regions is increasing,” said Tinseth. “Our customers continue to perform well in the marketplace and we’ll continue to support them with the industry’s best products and services.”

In addition to the orders and deliveries, the company marked a number of other milestones in 2015:

  • The 747 team delivered the 100th 747-8, the 767 program received its largest single order ever from FedEx and the 777 program announced a 2 percent fuel improvement package
  • Five customers received their first 787 Dreamliners, including Oman Air, Scoot, American Airlines, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines and Vietnam Airlines
  • The newly expanded Seattle Delivery Center opened its doors to pave the way for increased 737 production
  • The first 737 MAX rolled out of the factory in December
  • The 787-10 team completed detailed design of the newest member of the 787 family, while the 777X reached firm configuration, allowing the team to begin detailed design of parts, assemblies and other systems for the airplane

“Our newest development products are on schedule and poised to provide world-class value to our customers,” said Conner. “We could not have accomplished all we did in 2015 without the support and hard work of our employees, suppliers, partners and the community.”

Orders, deliveries and unfilled orders as of Dec. 31, 2015, by program were as follows:

Family Gross Orders Net Orders Deliveries Backlog
737 666 588 495 4392
747 6 2 18 20
767 49 49 16 80
777 58 58 98 524
787 99 71 135 779
Total 878 768 762 5795
Boeing 737 Max 7 in the colors of launch customer Southwest Airlines

Boeing 737 Max 7 in the colors of launch customer Southwest Airlines

Source: Boeing