Boeing: Aerospace-Composites for Making Non-Aviation Products

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

New partnership will reduce solid waste by more than one million pounds a year

Seattle, Dec. 5, 2018: Boeing and ELG Carbon Fibre today announced a partnership to recycle excess aerospace-grade composite material, which will be used by other companies to make products such as laptop cases, other electronic accessories, car parts and other automotive equipment.

The recycling agreement – the first of its kind for the aerospace industry – covers excess carbon fiber from 11 Boeing airplane manufacturing sites and will reduce solid waste by more than one million pounds a year.

Carbon-fiber reinforced material is extremely strong and lightweight, making it attractive for a variety of uses, including in building the super-efficient 787 Dreamliner and the all-new 777X airplane.

As the largest user of aerospace-grade composites from its commercial and defense programs, Boeing has been working for several years to create an economically viable carbon fiber reuse industry. The company improved its production methods to minimize excess and developed a model for collecting scrap material.

But technical barriers stood in the way of repurposing material that had already been “cured” or prepped for use in the airplane manufacturing process. UK-based ELG developed a proprietary method to recycle “cured” composites so they do not have to be thrown out.

“Recycling cured carbon fiber was not possible just a few years ago,” said Tia Benson Tolle, Boeing Materials & Fabrication director for Product Strategy & Future Airplane Development. “We are excited to collaborate with ELG and leverage innovative recycling methods to work toward a vision where no composite scrap will be sent to landfills.”

To prove that the recycling method can be applied on a grand scale, Boeing and ELG conducted a pilot project where they recycled excess material from Boeing’s Composite Wing Center in Everett, Wash., where the massive wings for the 777X airplane are made.

ELG put the excess materials through treatment in a furnace, which vaporizes the resin that holds the carbon fiber layers together and leaves behind clean material. Over the course of 18 months, the companies saved 1.5 million pounds of carbon fiber, which was cleaned and sold to companies in the electronics and ground transportation industries.

“Security of supply is extremely important when considering using these materials in long-term automotive and electronic projects,” said Frazer Barnes, managing director of ELG Carbon Fibre. “This agreement gives us the ability to provide that assurance, which gives our customers the confidence to use recycled materials.”

Based on the success of the pilot project, Boeing says the new agreement should save a majority of the excess composite material from its 11 sites, which will support the company’s goal to reduce solid waste going to landfills 20 percent by 2025.

“This collaboration takes Boeing’s commitment to protect the environment to a whole new level. Recycling composites will eventually be as commonplace as recycling aluminum and titanium,” said Kevin Bartelson, 777 Wing Operations leader.

Boeing and ELG are considering expanding the agreement to include excess material from three additional Boeing sites in Canada, China and Malaysia.

As a result of the partnership, ELG estimates the number of its employees will nearly triple from 39 in 2016 to an expected 112 by the end of 2019 as the recycling market continues to expand.

Source: Boeing

Boeing Delivers Its 2,000th Airplane to China

737-MAX

Delivery milestone reflects rapid growth in world’s largest commercial aviation market

 
Seattle, Nov. 30, 2018: Boeing today delivered its 2,000thairplane to a Chinese operator, a 737 MAX for Xiamen Airlines. The milestone and the pace at which it was reached reflect the accelerating growth in the world’s largest commercial aviation market.
Boeing delivered its first 1,000 airplanes to Chinese airlines over four decades. The next 1,000 Boeing jets have now been delivered over the past five years. The rapid pace continues as one in four Boeing-made commercial jet goes to a Chinese operator, either through direct purchase or lease.
The new 737 MAX delivered today sports a special logo commemorating the milestone. It is the eighth MAX airplane to join fast-growing Xiamen Airlines, which operates the largest all-Boeing fleet in China with more than 200 jets. The carrier also uses Boeing Global Services to improve the efficiency of its network and operations. Xiamen is the first Chinese airline to use Optimized Maintenance Program, which leverages Boeing AnalytX to recommend customized airplane maintenance plans.
Xiamen Airlines is one of Boeing’s more than 30 commercial customers in China. In all, Boeing-made jets comprise more than half of the greater than 3,000 jetliners flying in the country.
China’s commercial fleet is expected to more than double over the next 20 years. Boeing forecasts that China will need 7,690 new airplanes, valued at $1.2 trillion, by 2038. Boeing also forecasts China will experience strong growth in the commercial services market with demand growing $1.5 trillion over the next 20 years, accounting for 17 percent of world demand.
737-MAX

737 MAX for Xiamen Airlines: Boeing delivered its 2,000th airplane to a Chinese operator

China also plays a major role in building the world’s jetliners. The Chinese aerospace manufacturing industry supplies parts for every Boeing jet, including the 737 MAX, 777, and 787 Dreamliner. In December, Boeing and the Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China (COMAC) are set to deliver the first 737 MAX airplane from a completion and delivery center in Zhoushan, China. The facility will handle interior work and exterior painting of 737 MAXs for the Chinese market. Final assembly work will continue to be done at Boeing’s factory in Renton, Wash.
Boeing activity in China is valued at more than $1 billion in economy activity in China. This includes procurement from Boeing’s extensive supply base, joint venture revenues, operations, training, and research and development investment.
Source: Boeing

Boeing HorizonX Ventures Invests in Startup Matternet

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Autonomous logistics platform will enable global, next-generation cargo air transportation

Chicago, June 26, 2018: Boeing today announced its investment in Matternet, a Menlo Park, Calif.-based startup pioneering safe, on-demand unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) delivery operations in urban environments. Matternet’s advanced logistics platform – combined with Boeing’s expertise in complex logistics, integration and manufacturing capabilities – will further enable reliable, efficient cargo air transportation.

Matternet became the world’s first company to receive authorization to launch UAV operations over densely populated areas in Switzerland in 2017. Leveraging its Matternet Station, M2 drone and Cloud platform, the company has achieved safe flights over densely populated areas and partnered with Swiss Post for on-demand deliveries of medical samples to hospitals in Switzerland.

“Matternet’s technology and proven track record make the development of a safe, global autonomous air mobility system a near-term reality,” said Brian Schettler, managing director of Boeing HorizonXVentures. “Our investment will allow Matternet to scale its operations while strengthening Boeing’s position as a leader in next-generation transportation solutions.”

In May 2018, Matternet was selected to participate in a joint U.S. Department of Transportation and Federal Aviation Administration program aimed at accelerating integration of unmanned aircraft into national airspace. As part of the program, Matternet will work with hospitals, universities and transportation agencies in California and North Carolina to facilitate on-demand delivery of medical supplies and samples.

Today, Matternet joined an initiative to shape the future of mobility as part of the World Economic Forum. The company will participate in the Drone Innovators Network to accelerate a safe, sustainable, global mobility system focused on improving people’s lives.

Boeing HorizonX Ventures led the $16 million, Series A investment in Matternet, with participation by Swiss Post, Sony Innovation Fund and Levitate Capital.  The Boeing HorizonX Ventures investment portfolio is made up of companies specializing in technologies for aerospace and manufacturing innovations, including autonomous systems, energy and data storage, advanced materials, augmented reality systems and software, machine learning, hybrid-electric and hypersonic propulsion, and Internet of Things connectivity.

Source: Boeing

United Airlines Takes Delivery of Fuel Efficient 737 MAX 9

CO2 emissions significantly reduced compared with older generation aircraft

Chicago, April 23, 2018: United Airlines announced today that it has taken delivery of its first 737 MAX 9 aircraft from the BoeingDelivery Center in Seattle, WA. The new aircraft, which arrived right after Earth Day, reduces fuel use and CO2 emissions significantly compared with older generation aircraft. In honor of this more eco-friendly aircraft, United has given the MAX a new livery, similar to its fuel-efficient Boeing Dreamliner aircraft, so that employees and customers can easily recognize the plane and its superior fuel efficiency.

United expects to take delivery of two more 737 MAX 9 aircraft this month, and will have ten 737 MAX 9 aircraft by the end of 2018. As previously announced, the aircraft will enter United’s schedule June 7 with service between the airline’s hub at Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport and five cities – Anchorage, Alaska; Austin, Texas; Fort Lauderdale, FL; Orlando, FL. and San Diego. The aircraft will operate on additional routes from Houston and Los Angeles International Airport starting June 29.

United Airlines and United Express operate approximately 4,600 flights a day to 354 airports across five continents. In 2017, United and United Express operated more than 1.6 million flights carrying more than 148 million customers. For more information, please visit united.com.

The Boeing 737 MAX 9 reduces fuel use and CO2 emissions significantly compared with older generation aircraft

Source: United Airlines

Boeing 737 MAX 10 Reaches Firm Configuration

sustainable aviation

Airplane on track for deliveries starting in 2020 timeframe

Singapore, Feb. 6, 2018: Boeing’s 737 MAX 10 has reached a major milestone as the MAX program completed firm configuration on the airplane. This means engineers now have all the design requirements in place for what will be the largest member of Boeing’s single-aisle family. Boeing announced the achievement today at the Singapore Airshow.
“The steps we’ve taken to reach this point ensure the MAX 10 will be the most efficient and profitable single-aisle airplane the market has ever seen,” said Randy Tinseth, vice president of Marketing, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “We’re working closely with our airline customers to deliver on the performance and efficiency benefits we’ve promised.”
The 737 MAX 10, which will use a stretched fuselage that is 66 inches longer than the 737 MAX 9, now moves into the detailed design phase prior to the start of production. The airplane will carry up to 230 passengers, delivering 5 percent lower trip costs and 5 percent lower seat-mile costs compared to its competition.
The MAX 10 is coming off a strong launch at the 2017 Paris Air Show. The airplane now has more than 416 orders and commitments from 18 customers across the globe. Deliveries are scheduled to begin in the 2020 timeframe.
The MAX 10 will soon join the rest of the 737 MAX family. The first MAX 7 rolled out of the paint hangar earlier this week and will soon start flight tests. The MAX 8 has been in service since 2017, already carrying more than 1.8 million passengers. And the first MAX 9 is scheduled to be delivered in the coming weeks.
The 737 MAX family is designed to offer customers exceptional performance, with lower per-seat costs and an extended range that will open up new destinations in the single-aisle market. The 737 MAX incorporates the latest CFM International LEAP-1B engines, Advanced Technology winglets, Boeing Sky Interior, large flight deck displays and other features to deliver the highest efficiency, reliability and passenger comfort in the single-aisle market.   
The 737 MAX is the fastest-selling airplane in Boeing history, accumulating more than 4,300 orders from 92 customers worldwide. For more information and feature content, visit www.boeing.com/commercial/737max.
sustainable aviation

Boeing 737 MAX 10 Reaches Firm Configuration (PRNewsfoto/Boeing)

Source: Boeing

Boeing Debuts First 737 MAX 7

sustainable aviation

Longest-range MAX airplane offers 18% less fuel consumption per seat

Renton (Seattle), Wash., Feb. 5, 2018: Boeing marked another airplane development milestone today as thousands of employees celebrated the debut of the first 737 MAX 7 at the company’s Renton factory.
The MAX 7 is the third and newest member of Boeing’s 737 MAX family to come down the assembly line. The jet is designed for up to 172 passengers and a maximum range of 3,850 nautical miles, which is the longest range of the MAX airplane family.
Technology improvements allow the MAX 7 to fly 1,000 nautical miles farther and carry more passengers than its predecessor, the 737-700, while having 18 percent lower fuel costs per seat.
The first MAX 7 will now undergo system checks, fueling and engine runs on the flight line in Renton. The airplane, the first of two MAX 7 flight test airplanes, will begin its flight testing program in the coming weeks.
The 737 MAX 7 is scheduled to enter service in 2019, following delivery to launch customer Southwest Airlines.
The entire 737 MAX family is designed to offer customers exceptional performance, with lower per-seat costs and an extended range that will open up new destinations in the single-aisle market. The MAX 8 entered service with customers across the globe last year, and the MAX 9 will start deliveries in the coming months. The MAX 10 was launched at last year’s Paris Air Show and is scheduled to enter service in the 2020 timeframe.   
The 737 MAX is the fastest-selling airplane in Boeing history, accumulating more than 4,300 orders from 92 customers worldwide. For more information and feature content, visit www.boeing.com/commercial/737max.
sustainable aviation

MAX-7 Paint Hangar Rollout for Employee Rollout Ceremony

Source: Boeing

Boeing’s 787-10 Dreamliner Cleared for Commercial Service by FAA

sustainable aviation

25 % better fuel per seat and emissions than current airplanes

Everett, Wash., Jan. 22, 2018: Boeing announced today the 787-10 Dreamliner received an amended type certificate (ATC) from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), clearing the airplane for commercial service.

The awarding of ATC caps a successful flight test program that began in March 2017 and involved three flight test airplanes that accumulated about 900 test hours. Boeing’s flight test program team took the airplanes through a series of tests to confirm the airplane’s handling, systems and overall performance met internal requirements and certification standards to ensure safety of flight.

Other aviation regulatory agencies are expected to follow the FAA’s lead and certify the airplane before it enters service.

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is a family of super-efficient airplanes with new passenger-pleasing features. As a stretch of the 787-9, the 787-10 retains over 95 percent commonality while adding seats and cargo capacity, setting a new benchmark for fuel efficiency and operating economics at 25 percent better fuel per seat and emissions than the airplanes it will replace. The airplane can fly 330 passengers, in a typical two-class configuration, up to 6,430 nautical miles (11,910 km).

To date, Boeing has over 170 orders for the 787-10 from nine customers worldwide. First delivery is expected to Singapore Airlines in the first half of 2018.

sustainable aviation

Boeing Flight Test & Evaluation, Boeing Field, Seattle, Flight Test, 787-10 Dreamliner, ZC001, Test 004-04, Flutter, puffy clouds, Eastern washington

Source: Boeing

Boeing: Airlines in Middle East expected to need 3,350 new airplanes over next 20 years

International Association for Sustainable Aviation

Growing airport hubs, diverse business models and infrastructure investments driving regional demand

Dubai, November 13, 2017: Boeing forecasts that airlines in the Middle East will need 3,350 new airplanes over the next 20 years, valued at an estimated $730 billion. Boeing presented its 2017 Current Market Outlook (CMO) for the region during the Dubai Airshow.

“Traffic growth in the Middle East is expected to grow at 5.6 percent annually during the next 20 years,” said Randy Tinseth, vice president of Marketing, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “The fact that 85 percent of the world’s population lives within an eight-hour flight of the Arabian Gulf, coupled with robust business models and investment in infrastructure, allows carriers in the Middle East to channel traffic through their hubs and offer one-stop service between many cities.”

Twin-aisle airplanes are expected to make up nearly 50 percent of the new airplanes in the Middle East, and more than 70 percent of the value at $520 billion. Both percentages are significantly higher than the global average. The strong long-term demand for widebody airplanes was reinforced at the show as Emirates Airline announced a commitment to purchase 40 Boeing 787-10 Dreamliners in a deal valued at $15.1 billion at current list prices.

More than half of the total deliveries in the Middle East will be single-aisle airplanes such as the 737 MAX. Operators in the region will need 1,770 single-aisle airplanes valued at $190 billion, driven by the growth of low-cost carriers.

Around the world, Boeing has forecasted long-term demand for 41,030 new airplanes, valued at $6.1 trillion. These new airplanes will replace older, less (fuel) efficient airplanes, benefiting airlines and passengers and stimulating growth in emerging markets and innovation in airline business models.

International Association for Sustainable Aviation

Boeing 777-300ER showing the colors of Emirates
Photo: Boeing

For more information on Boeing’s Current Market Outlook please visit:
http://www.boeing.com/cmo

Source: Boeing

Bittersweet farewell to the ‘Queen of Skies’

United celebrated the retirement of the Boeing 747

San Francisco, November 7, 2017: United Airlines celebrated the retirement of the Boeing 747 with the recreation of the airline’s first 747 flight from San Francisco to Honolulu on July 23, 1970. Flight UA747 departed to Honolulu with more than 300 customers, employees and distinguished guests onboard. “The iconic 747 is a remarkably special aircraft that signaled a new era of air travel and was equally recognizable and beloved by our customers and crew alike,” said Oscar Munoz, CEO of United. “While today is bittersweet, we’ll continue to honor the Queen of the Skies’ game-changing legacy of connecting people and uniting the world with our next-generation of long-haul aircraft.”

Upon landing in Honolulu, local employees welcomed the aircraft with final festivities to close out the historic day, including remarks from United leaders and Hawaii State Representative Henry J.C. Aquino.

United 747s wrote history several times: On January 29-30, 1988,  Friendship One, a Boeing 747SP, set a new around-the-world air speed record of 36 hours, 54 minutes, and 15 seconds. This special flight raised $500,000 for children’s charities through the Friendship Foundation. Tickets cost a minimum of $5,000. Special guest passengers included astronaut and first man on the moon Neil Armstrong, famed test pilots Bob Hoover and Lieutenant General Laurence C. Craigie, and Moya Lear, the widow of Lear Jet founder Bill Lear.

In September 1996, a 747SP previously flown by United, was transformed into NASA’s/DLR’s  SOFIA, a Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, which carries a 17-ton, 8-foot-wide infrared telescope mounted behind an enormous sliding door.

During October 2017 United employees got a chance to say goodbye to the 747 when the aircraft went on a farewell tour with stops at each of the carrier’s U.S. hubs.

sustainable aviation

Flying into the sunset: United Airlines flew a Boeing 747 for the final time on November 7, 2017

Source: United Airlines

NASA Advances Concepts for Next-gen Aircraft

sustainable aviation

Higher efficiency, less noise and fewer emissions!

Cleveland, November 7, 2017: An aviation renaissance, one focused on energy efficiency and economic impact, is on the horizon, and it’s changing how engineers look at aircraft power and design.

Although the aircraft industry continues to adopt innovative technologies, which are making current aircraft more energy efficient, there’s new interest in exploring alternative propulsion systems and energy sources. This new interest presents an opportunity to develop cutting-edge technologies that will dramatically reduce fuel usage, while opening up potential new markets and business opportunities for American companies and carriers.

“I feel we are at a tipping point in commercial aviation,” says Jim Heidmann, manager of NASA’s Advanced Air Transport Technology Project (AATT). “We are exploring and developing game-changing technologies and concepts for aircraft and propulsion systems that can dramatically improve efficiency and reduce environmental impact and accelerate the introduction of new aircraft.”

To provide better efficiency with less noise and fewer emissions, NASA is working with the aviation industry and academia to develop unique vehicle concepts that will use different fuselage shapes; longer, skinnier and more blended wings; innovative materials and components; and highly-integrated propulsion (engine) systems.

NASA aims to accelerate the final testing and validation of these advanced concepts and technologies through its New Aviation Horizons initiative. This initiative outlines the development of a series of experimental planes (X-planes), which will achieve the agency’s aircraft-level metrics for fuel consumption, emissions and noise.

The work has already begun under New Aviation Horizons as NASA is preparing to build and fly the first such X-plane – a low-boom supersonic flight demonstrator.

A turboelectric aircraft configuration is among several candidates for future subsonic transport X-planes that will prove the benefits of these advanced technologies in piloted flight within the next decade.

STARC Contrast: Smaller engines provide more power

One of the most pivotal areas of commercial aviation’s transformation centers around propulsion, and a team of engineers at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland is conducting cutting-edge research into high-pressure-ratio compact gas turbine engines, low-emission combustors, electric-enhanced propulsion and boundary-layer ingesting (BLI) engines.

“We believe global competition and international certification standards will drive reduced fuel consumption and more efficient aircraft and propulsion concepts that may use cleaner forms of energy,” said Heidmann. “We also see the potential emergence of alternative modes of commercial transport, such as on-demand and flight service between rarely-traveled locations, both of which would represent new markets and potential beneficiaries of revolutionary propulsion technologies.”

Some of the key propulsion system advances the NASA Glenn team is pursuing converge in an aircraft concept study called STARC-ABL (single-aisle turboelectric aircraft with an aft [at the rear of the aircraft] boundary-layer propulsor).

The STARC-ABL concept, developed by NASA’s Jim Felder and Jason Welstead, is under consideration as one of NASA’s future X-planes. It looks similar to the proven tube-and-wing aircraft you see every day. But, unlike those aircraft, a significant amount of electrical power, approximately three megawatts, is used for turboelectric propulsion, in addition to the electrical operation of subsystems like flight controls, avionics and de-icing.

Imagine a Boeing 737, but with slightly smaller engines. Not a dramatic design departure, but STARC-ABL’s tail features a “T-tail” horizontal stabilizer configuration with a BLI ducted fan on the tail, which is driven purely by electric power derived from generators mounted to the underwing engines.

The wing-mounted engines supply 80 percent of the thrust required during takeoff and 55 percent at cruise, while the tail-mounted, all-electric BLI turbofan accounts for remaining thrust. Researchers predict a potential fuel consumption improvement of roughly 10 percent using this innovative system.

 

Next Step: Collaboration leads to solutions

While NASA is preparing for initial ground tests of a subscale STARC-ABL concept later this fall at NASA’s Electric Aircraft Testbed (NEAT) at Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, several vehicle-level development challenges remain: How to balance aerodynamic efficiency, appropriately optimize the engines and aft BLI fan, validate the BLI benefits, store energy, compensate for additional weight, and meet safety and operational requirements.

To further investigate the challenges surrounding the hybridization of commercial aircraft, NASA is looking to industry and academic expertise for solutions.

NASA recently awarded 12-month contracts to Boeing, teamed with Georgia Tech, and Liberty Works, with ES Aero, to develop preliminary single-aisle, 150-seat aircraft designs using promising electric-enhanced propulsion and vehicle configuration concepts.

“During the 12-month cycle, we’ll work with the teams to take a deep dive into their hybrid and turboelectric aircraft concepts,” said Amy Jankovsky, NASA’s AATT subproject manager. “These concepts will provide in-depth, detailed analyses of the propulsion and electrical systems, and we will recommend technology development paths for their concepts.”

The year-long study will also reveal new development approaches and any unforeseen technological hurdles, as well as any safety and flight certification challenges that could get an aircraft like STARC-ABL or other next-generation, hybrid or turboelectric aircraft concepts aloft within 20 years.

And while those proposed industry concepts could look like STARC-ABL, the real objective is to transform commercial aviation by using new propulsion technologies that meet NASA’s aircraft-level requirements of energy use, life-cycle carbon, landing-and-takeoff emissions and noise.

 

Ready for Takeoff: Development, testing, flight

Final reports from the industry study will outline hybrid-electric and conventional single-aisle aircraft concept designs, technology roadmaps for the major electrical systems and aircraft subsystems, and the evaluation of the concepts’ performance against NASA aircraft metrics.

“As we move forward, we’d like to further develop the powertrains for these and any other concepts that may prove viable by building and testing them at NEAT and other NASA facilities,” said Jankovsky. “We’ll identify key performance parameters for components such as motors, generators and power electronics, and any wind tunnel, altitude and other ground tests and flight demonstrations that are appropriate.”

Ultimately, NASA hopes to contribute to a next-generation aircraft that will substantially reduce fuel burn, noise and emissions. Many researchers feel we are only a few steps away from a major aviation revolution, and that a commercial aircraft using NASA-developed, hybrid-electric or turboelectric propulsion technology could be flying to an airport near you in the not too distant future.

Source: NASA, Glenn Research Center

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