Harbour Air and magniX Partner to Build World’s First All-Electric Airline

IASA - Sustainable Aviation

Aviation Leaders Set to Transform Seaplanes into ePlanes — a Zero-emission Aircraft for the Future

REDMOND, WA and VANCOUVER, B.C. – March 26, 2019 – magniX, the company powering the electric aviation revolution, and Harbour Air, North America’s largest seaplane airline, today announced a partnership to transform Harbour Air seaplanes into an all-electric commercial fleet powered by the magni500, a 750 horsepower (HP) all-electric motor.

Operating 12 routes between hubs like Seattle and Vancouver and across the pristine natural wilderness of the Pacific Northwest, Harbour Air welcomes more than 500,000 passengers on 30,000 commercial flights each year. Through this partnership, both companies are furthering the vision to someday connect communities with clean, efficient and affordable electric air travel.

“Harbour Air first demonstrated its commitment to sustainability by becoming the first fully carbon-neutral airline in North America in 2007, through the purchase of carbon offsets,” said Greg McDougall, founder and CEO of Harbour Air Seaplanes. “Through our commitment to making a positive impact on people’s lives, the communities where we operate and the environment, we are once again pushing the boundaries of aviation by becoming the first commercial aircraft to be powered by electric propulsion. We are excited to bring commercial electric aviation to the Pacific Northwest, turning our seaplanes into ePlanes.”

The aviation industry currently contributes 12 percent of all U.S. carbon emissions and 4.9 percent globally, all while providing few low-cost, fuel-efficient options for passenger flights under 1,000 miles. By modifying existing Harbour Air planes with innovative, all-electric magniX propulsion systems, the partnership will create the world’s first completely electric commercial seaplane fleet. A Harbour Air ePlane will have zero reliance on fossil fuels and produce zero emissions – a significant step forward in the innovation and advancement of the airline industry.

“In 2018, 75 percent of worldwide airline flights were 1,000 miles or less in range. With magniX’s new propulsion systems coupled with emerging battery capabilities, we see tremendous potential for electric aviation to transform this heavily trafficked ‘middle mile’ range,” said Roei Ganzarski, CEO of magniX. “We’re excited to partner with Harbour Air, a forward thinking, like-minded company that is dedicated to bringing environmentally conscious, cost effective air-transport solutions to the West Coast of North America. This partnership will set the standard for the future of commercial aviation operators.”

IASA - Sustainable Aviation

The first aircraft to be converted will be the DHC-2 de Havilland Beaver, a six-passenger commercial aircraft used across Harbour Air’s route network. Harbour Air and magniX expect to conduct first flight tests of the all-electric aircraft in late 2019.

This partnership follows significant milestones for both companies, including the successful testing of magniX’s 350 HP all-electric motor and the addition of a Vancouver to Seattle route in Harbour Air’s destination roster.

Source: Harbour Air

Bringing together international expertise on jet biofuel and electric aircraft

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Press Release   •   Mar 21, 2018 12:18 GMT

electric aircraft

On Thursday Avinor, the Federation of Norwegian Aviation Industries and Zero are organizing the conference “Emission-free aviation in 2040?”

“Aviation is of key importance for Norway and the industry must take its share of responsibility to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Sustainable jet biofuel will play an important role and we are facing the electrification of aviation. We want to bring together the communities working on these issues, with an aim of sharing expertise and insights for the road forward,” says CEO of Avinor, Dag Falk-Petersen.

Must develop the market for jet biofuel
Studies show that 30 per cent of all aviation fuel at Avinor’s airports can become sustainable by 2030. The fuel can be produced from forestry waste and pulpwood from Norwegian forests. At Avinor Oslo airport and Bergen Airport, Flesland, jet biofuel is available, but it is difficult to source enough.

In 2016 1.25 million litres of sustainable jet biofuel were uplifted in Norway. This corresponded to 0.1 per cent of all jet fuel sold in Norway that year. In August 2017 the scheme was also extended to include Flesland. However, there was very limited availability of jet biofuel on the market in 2017, resulting in the drop in of only 125,000 litres of jet biofuel during the year in total for the two airports.

“Currently very little sustainable jet biofuel is produced globally, and what little there is has a price that is not competitive. To achieve the target of a 30 per cent drop in and corresponding emission reductions, there will therefore be a need for public instruments,” says Torbjørn Lothe, Managing Director of the Federation of Norwegian Aviation Industries (NHO Luftfart).

Electric aircraft are on the way
There is considerable interest in and a good deal of activity surrounding the development of electric aircraft. A number of stakeholders, including Boeing, Airbus, Siemens, Rolls Royce, and NASA, are working with and can see the commercial potential of electric and hybrid-electric aircraft. In Norway, Avinor is playing an active role in these efforts. Together with the Norwegian Association of Air Sports (NLF), Avinor has established a long-term project for the introduction of electric aircraft in Norwegian aviation. The project is supported by the government, and the project partners are Widerøe, SAS, and the climate foundation ZERO.

“Just a short time ago electric aircraft were unimaginable. Now a number of major players are claiming that in only a few years they will be able to provide aircraft with electric solutions for domestic scheduled traffic in Norway. In order to bring up the volume of emission reductions from aviation, we also need to see a quick phasing in of sustainable jet biofuel. This will allow Norway to lead the way and show how we can realign aviation,” says Marius Holm, head of ZERO.

Detailed programme and registration here: https://avinor.no/en/corporate/emission-free-aviation-in-2040/

Source: Avinor