United Airlines Takes Delivery of Fuel Efficient 737 MAX 9

CO2 emissions significantly reduced compared with older generation aircraft

Chicago, April 23, 2018: United Airlines announced today that it has taken delivery of its first 737 MAX 9 aircraft from the BoeingDelivery Center in Seattle, WA. The new aircraft, which arrived right after Earth Day, reduces fuel use and CO2 emissions significantly compared with older generation aircraft. In honor of this more eco-friendly aircraft, United has given the MAX a new livery, similar to its fuel-efficient Boeing Dreamliner aircraft, so that employees and customers can easily recognize the plane and its superior fuel efficiency.

United expects to take delivery of two more 737 MAX 9 aircraft this month, and will have ten 737 MAX 9 aircraft by the end of 2018. As previously announced, the aircraft will enter United’s schedule June 7 with service between the airline’s hub at Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport and five cities – Anchorage, Alaska; Austin, Texas; Fort Lauderdale, FL; Orlando, FL. and San Diego. The aircraft will operate on additional routes from Houston and Los Angeles International Airport starting June 29.

United Airlines and United Express operate approximately 4,600 flights a day to 354 airports across five continents. In 2017, United and United Express operated more than 1.6 million flights carrying more than 148 million customers. For more information, please visit united.com.

The Boeing 737 MAX 9 reduces fuel use and CO2 emissions significantly compared with older generation aircraft

Source: United Airlines

‘Go Electric’: Heathrow Welcomes 50th Electric Vehicle

Airport has the highest density of EV charging infrastructure in Europe

Heathrow Airport, December 7,2017: Heathrow has reached a key milestone in its pledge to ‘Go Electric’ with the delivery of the 50th electric vehicle to the airport’s fleet. This is a key step in Heathrow’s promise to make all of its cars and small vans electric or plug-in hybrid by 2020 to help improve air quality around the airport. The 50 electric vehicles reduce the airport’s fleet emissions by 165 tonnes CO2/year, equivalent to the amount of energy used by 18 homes annually.

This announcement comes as Heathrow celebrates receiving two awards for their fleet. The airport recently received the award for Ultra-Low Emission Infrastructure at the Energy Saving Trust’s 2017 Fleet Hero Awards. Heathrow won the accolade for the airport’s achievements growing the current charging infrastructure, which is now the site with the highest density of charging infrastructure in Europe. Heathrow’s has over 80 charging points available to passengers, colleagues and airside vehicles.

Since pledging to ‘Go Electric’, Heathrow has spent over £4 million in charging infrastructure, with a total of more than £5 million committed to be spent by the end of 2018. Heathrow is also actively working in collaboration with TfL (Transport for London) to install seven rapid charging points for black cabs before the end of 2017. These rapid charging points, some of the first in London, will support the Mayor’s requirements for all newly licensed black cabs to be either electric or plug in hybrid by  Jan 1, 2018. These chargers will be installed in Heathrow’s Taxi Feeder Park and will work over three times faster than the average charger.

This move, along with Heathrow’s efforts to provide new public transport options into the airport like Crossrail and a potential Western Rail access, will reduce emissions and congestion related to airport traffic, and set a bold direction towards a future of sustainable aviation.

Since committing to a new sustainability strategy, Heathrow 2.0, the airport has set out to establish itself as a world-leading airport in reducing emissions from all sources of activity, both on and off airport. Heathrow 2.0 is the airport’s plan for sustainable growth.  Heathrow 2.0 will allow the airport to expand to meet demand in a way that creates a positive impact on the community, environment and economy.

Source: Heathrow Airport

ICAO’s International Civil Aviation Day on December 7

Strong commitment to historic emissions control standards 

The purpose of International Civil Aviation Day is to help generate and reinforce worldwide awareness of the importance of international civil aviation to the social and economic development of States, and of the unique role of ICAO in helping States to cooperate and realize a truly global rapid transit network at the service of all mankind.

In the Environmental domain especially in 2016, the aviation community’s strong commitment to come together on behalf of our planet has helped aviation to once again show its strength and leadership through new and historic emissions control Standards and agreements. 

As the UN and world nations have now adopted Agenda 2030, and embarked on a new era in global sustainable development, the importance of aviation as an engine of global connectivity has never been more relevant to the Chicago Convention’s objectives to look to international flight as a fundamental enabler of global peace and prosperity.

Since 2014, every five years, coinciding with ICAO anniversaries, the ICAO Council establishes a special anniversary theme for International Civil Aviation Day. Between these anniversary years, Council representatives select a single theme for the full four-year intervening period. For 2015-2018 inclusive the Council has selected the following theme:  “Working Together to Ensure No Country is Left Behind”

International Civil Aviation Day was established in 1994 as part of ICAO’s 50th anniversary activities. In 1996, pursuant to an ICAO initiative and with the assistance of the Canadian Government, the United Nations General Assembly officially recognized 7 December as International Civil Aviation Day in the UN system.

Source: ICAO

Neste and American Collaborate on Renewable Fuels

sustainable aviation

Airline excited about the continued progress in the renewable fuels

Keilaranta, November 13, 2017: Neste, the world’s leading producer of renewable diesel, and American Airlines, the world’s largest airline, have entered into an agreement to explore opportunities to further reduce American’s environmental footprint through the use of Neste’s renewable fuels. One goal of the cooperation will be complementary efforts to facilitate acceptance and commercialization of High Freeze Point HEFA (HFP-HEFA) renewable jet fuel which is currently under consideration for approval by ASTM International, a globally recognized leader in the development and delivery of voluntary consensus standards for a range of industries.
“Together, Neste and American Airlines are evaluating in-flight and on-the-ground opportunities for mutually beneficial cooperation and collaboration,” says Kaisa Hietala, Neste’s Executive Vice President of Renewable Products. “We share a common view that innovative low-carbon solutions are needed to help the aviation industry meet its greenhouse gas emission reduction goals, and renewable jet fuel is an important part of the solution.”
 “We are excited about the continued progress in the renewable fuels industry,” said Steve Johnson, American’s Executive Vice President of Corporate Affairs, who announced the cooperation between Neste and American Airlines at the Airports Going Green conference this week in Dallas. “We believe commercially viable renewable fuels have the potential to play an important role in helping American further reduce emissions beyond our significant investment in fuel efficient aircraft.”
The aviation industry has set ambitious targets to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from air transportation, including carbon-neutral growth from 2020 and beyond, and a 50 percent reduction of net aviation CO2 emissions by 2050. Currently, sustainable renewable jet fuel offers the only viable alternative to fossil liquid fuels for powering commercial aircraft.
American Airlines has already taken significant steps to reduce its carbon footprint with an unprecedented fleet renewal program. By the end of 2017, American will have invested more than $18 billion and introduced 496 new aircraft into its fleet since the merger, while retiring 469 older aircraft – giving American the youngest fleet of the U.S. network carriers.
sustainable aviation

Boeing 737 showing the colors of American Airlines
Photo: American Airlines

Neste’s renewable jet fuel technology is proven. Its quality standards, aircraft engine performance, and storage stability and integrity have been tested and followed in thousands of commercial flights. Neste MY Renewable Jet Fuel(TM) provides distinct advantages to its customers by decreasing their environmental footprint. Neste MY Renewable Jet Fuel(TM) is made from renewable and sustainable raw materials and significantly reduces life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions.
Source: Neste Corporation

NASA Advances Concepts for Next-gen Aircraft

sustainable aviation

Higher efficiency, less noise and fewer emissions!

Cleveland, November 7, 2017: An aviation renaissance, one focused on energy efficiency and economic impact, is on the horizon, and it’s changing how engineers look at aircraft power and design.

Although the aircraft industry continues to adopt innovative technologies, which are making current aircraft more energy efficient, there’s new interest in exploring alternative propulsion systems and energy sources. This new interest presents an opportunity to develop cutting-edge technologies that will dramatically reduce fuel usage, while opening up potential new markets and business opportunities for American companies and carriers.

“I feel we are at a tipping point in commercial aviation,” says Jim Heidmann, manager of NASA’s Advanced Air Transport Technology Project (AATT). “We are exploring and developing game-changing technologies and concepts for aircraft and propulsion systems that can dramatically improve efficiency and reduce environmental impact and accelerate the introduction of new aircraft.”

To provide better efficiency with less noise and fewer emissions, NASA is working with the aviation industry and academia to develop unique vehicle concepts that will use different fuselage shapes; longer, skinnier and more blended wings; innovative materials and components; and highly-integrated propulsion (engine) systems.

NASA aims to accelerate the final testing and validation of these advanced concepts and technologies through its New Aviation Horizons initiative. This initiative outlines the development of a series of experimental planes (X-planes), which will achieve the agency’s aircraft-level metrics for fuel consumption, emissions and noise.

The work has already begun under New Aviation Horizons as NASA is preparing to build and fly the first such X-plane – a low-boom supersonic flight demonstrator.

A turboelectric aircraft configuration is among several candidates for future subsonic transport X-planes that will prove the benefits of these advanced technologies in piloted flight within the next decade.

STARC Contrast: Smaller engines provide more power

One of the most pivotal areas of commercial aviation’s transformation centers around propulsion, and a team of engineers at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland is conducting cutting-edge research into high-pressure-ratio compact gas turbine engines, low-emission combustors, electric-enhanced propulsion and boundary-layer ingesting (BLI) engines.

“We believe global competition and international certification standards will drive reduced fuel consumption and more efficient aircraft and propulsion concepts that may use cleaner forms of energy,” said Heidmann. “We also see the potential emergence of alternative modes of commercial transport, such as on-demand and flight service between rarely-traveled locations, both of which would represent new markets and potential beneficiaries of revolutionary propulsion technologies.”

Some of the key propulsion system advances the NASA Glenn team is pursuing converge in an aircraft concept study called STARC-ABL (single-aisle turboelectric aircraft with an aft [at the rear of the aircraft] boundary-layer propulsor).

The STARC-ABL concept, developed by NASA’s Jim Felder and Jason Welstead, is under consideration as one of NASA’s future X-planes. It looks similar to the proven tube-and-wing aircraft you see every day. But, unlike those aircraft, a significant amount of electrical power, approximately three megawatts, is used for turboelectric propulsion, in addition to the electrical operation of subsystems like flight controls, avionics and de-icing.

Imagine a Boeing 737, but with slightly smaller engines. Not a dramatic design departure, but STARC-ABL’s tail features a “T-tail” horizontal stabilizer configuration with a BLI ducted fan on the tail, which is driven purely by electric power derived from generators mounted to the underwing engines.

The wing-mounted engines supply 80 percent of the thrust required during takeoff and 55 percent at cruise, while the tail-mounted, all-electric BLI turbofan accounts for remaining thrust. Researchers predict a potential fuel consumption improvement of roughly 10 percent using this innovative system.

 

Next Step: Collaboration leads to solutions

While NASA is preparing for initial ground tests of a subscale STARC-ABL concept later this fall at NASA’s Electric Aircraft Testbed (NEAT) at Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, several vehicle-level development challenges remain: How to balance aerodynamic efficiency, appropriately optimize the engines and aft BLI fan, validate the BLI benefits, store energy, compensate for additional weight, and meet safety and operational requirements.

To further investigate the challenges surrounding the hybridization of commercial aircraft, NASA is looking to industry and academic expertise for solutions.

NASA recently awarded 12-month contracts to Boeing, teamed with Georgia Tech, and Liberty Works, with ES Aero, to develop preliminary single-aisle, 150-seat aircraft designs using promising electric-enhanced propulsion and vehicle configuration concepts.

“During the 12-month cycle, we’ll work with the teams to take a deep dive into their hybrid and turboelectric aircraft concepts,” said Amy Jankovsky, NASA’s AATT subproject manager. “These concepts will provide in-depth, detailed analyses of the propulsion and electrical systems, and we will recommend technology development paths for their concepts.”

The year-long study will also reveal new development approaches and any unforeseen technological hurdles, as well as any safety and flight certification challenges that could get an aircraft like STARC-ABL or other next-generation, hybrid or turboelectric aircraft concepts aloft within 20 years.

And while those proposed industry concepts could look like STARC-ABL, the real objective is to transform commercial aviation by using new propulsion technologies that meet NASA’s aircraft-level requirements of energy use, life-cycle carbon, landing-and-takeoff emissions and noise.

 

Ready for Takeoff: Development, testing, flight

Final reports from the industry study will outline hybrid-electric and conventional single-aisle aircraft concept designs, technology roadmaps for the major electrical systems and aircraft subsystems, and the evaluation of the concepts’ performance against NASA aircraft metrics.

“As we move forward, we’d like to further develop the powertrains for these and any other concepts that may prove viable by building and testing them at NEAT and other NASA facilities,” said Jankovsky. “We’ll identify key performance parameters for components such as motors, generators and power electronics, and any wind tunnel, altitude and other ground tests and flight demonstrations that are appropriate.”

Ultimately, NASA hopes to contribute to a next-generation aircraft that will substantially reduce fuel burn, noise and emissions. Many researchers feel we are only a few steps away from a major aviation revolution, and that a commercial aircraft using NASA-developed, hybrid-electric or turboelectric propulsion technology could be flying to an airport near you in the not too distant future.

Source: NASA, Glenn Research Center

Qantas Aircraft to be Powered by Renewable Biofuel from 2020

sustainable aviation

Airline will purchase 30 million liters of renewable jet fuel each year

 
Sydney, October 13, 2017: Qantas has today announced its Los Angeles based aircraft will be powered by biofuel from 2020, reducing the airline’s carbon emissions on its services operating between the US and Australia.
Over the next ten years, the airline will purchase eight million gallons (30 million litres) of renewable jet fuel each year from US based bio-energy company, SG Preston. The fuel will be used by Qantas’ aircraft operating from Los Angeles Airport (LAX) to Australia and follows the Qantas Group’s successful domestic biofuel trial flights in 2012.
The fuel consists of 50 percent renewable jet fuel produced from non-food plant oils, blended with 50 percent traditional jet fuel.  Compared to standard jet fuel, the biofuel emits half the amount of carbon emissions per gallon over its life cycle.
CEO of Qantas International and Freight, Gareth Evans said the commercial biofuel agreement is the first of its kind in Australian aviation history: “The partnership with SG Preston is part of our commitment to lowering carbon emissions across our operations and sees us becoming the first Australian airline to use renewable jet fuel on an ongoing basis. As an airline group we are constantly looking for ways to become more fuel efficient and embrace new technologies and this partnership is a significant step on that journey. Our agreement with SG Preston allows us to secure a supply for our Los Angeles based aircraft where we have a large fuel demand and where the biofuel industry is more advanced.Through our biofuel program we are also exploring renewable jet fuel opportunities in Australia and continue to work with suppliers to develop locally produced biofuels for aviation use.”
Director of Environment for IATA, Michael Gill applauded Qantas and SG Preston on the new deal:“IATA congratulates Qantas and SG Preston on this landmark agreement, being the first commercial biofuel offtake for an Australian airline. Deals such as these are critical to the development of an aviation biofuel sector globally and the achievement of the aviation industry’s climate goals.”
Renewable jet fuel is chemically equivalent to, and meets the same technical, performance and safety standards as conventional jet fuel. SG Preston’s biofuel is produced from renewable plant oils, which do not compete with food production and which meet Qantas’ stringent sustainability certification requirements.
sustainable aviation

Boeing 787-9 showing the colors of Qantas
Photo: Qantas

In 2012 Qantas and Jetstar operated Australia’s first biofuel trial flights. Qantas’ A330 Sydney-Adelaide return service and Jetstar’s A320 Melbourne-Hobart return service were both powered with biofuel derived from used cooking oil (split with 50:50 convential jet fuel) certified for use in commercial aviation
Source: Qantas

Neste: Business Environment Outlook Published

Climate Change Sustainable Aviation

‘Taking Action on Climate Change’ examines changes in energy and transport markets

 
Keilaranta, October 5, 2017: Neste has published a business environment outlook called Taking Action on Climate Change. It discusses key changes taking place in the energy, transport and chemicals markets. As global commitment to tackle climate change requires major efforts to reduce emissions, the use of fossil raw materials will inevitably need to decline in all of these sectors. Neste has risen to become the global leader in renewable diesel, and realizes that there is significant potential for renewable solutions not only in the road transport sector but also in aviation and the plastics industries.
 
Electric vehicles are on the way – what is Neste’s response?
Neste estimates that by 2030, approximately ten percent of the global car fleet will be electric cars. Despite the fact that electric vehicles are expected to rapidly become more common for passenger transport, Neste believes that renewable diesel will remain a competitive solution for reducing transport emissions. By 2021, renewable diesel demand is expected to have doubled in North America, the Nordic countries and Europe.
“The increase of electric cars is a good thing, because we need every possible solution to combat climate change,” says Neste’s President & CEO, Matti Lievonen. “Renewable diesel is also needed, since for the time being it’s one of the most cost-efficient ways to reduce climate emissions, and can do so by as much as 90 percent. Many cities and businesses in Finland, Sweden and also in California have opted for 100 percent Neste MY Renewable Diesel for this reason.”
To achieve Finland’s planned 50 percent emission reduction target by 2030, both biofuels and electric vehicles using emission-free power will be needed in abundance.
 
What is the future of diesel vehicles and diesel fuel?
Some major cities have announced bans or restrictions on diesel vehicles to tackle air quality problems. Due to emissions cheating, the reputation of diesel cars has suffered greatly. Neste believes that the problem of emissions from diesel vehicles can be solved, and that diesel technology will remain competitive for a long time to come.
“Engine standards are evolving, and the automotive industry is committed to important measures to achieve significantly lower tailpipe emissions. One of the ways to further reduce the heavy traffic emissions is to choose 100% biofuels, such as Neste MY Renewable Diesel,” says Lievonen.
In Europe, demand for diesel and other fuels that are classified as middle distillates is expected to grow by more than 10 million tons by 2025. One part of this growth is being driven by the increase in demand for heavy transportation and air traffic. About 70 percent of diesel use is accounted for by heavy transportation.
In the coming years, demand for middle distillates, like diesel, will also increase significantly in shipping, where the IMO’s (International Maritime Organization) global sulfur regulation, which comes into force in 2020, will limit the sulfur content in marine fuels to below 0.5 percent. This means that much of the shipping industry will switch from heavy fuel oil to low-sulfur marine fuels. Neste offers ship owners low-sulfur marine fuels that meet the new emission limits.
 
Renewable solutions for air traffic are on the way
The aviation industry, which consumes rapidly growing volumes of fuel, is also opening up to renewable jet fuels. Legislation to support this change is being developed in several regions, including the EU, Norway, and California. 
“Renewable fuels are seen as an important solution for reducing emissions from air transport. Solutions are needed because at the same time as the aviation industry is committed to reducing its carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, demand for aviation fuel is projected to grow globally by 100 million tons over the next ten years,” says Lievonen.
Neste is a global pioneer in renewable air transport solutions, as the Neste Green Hub solution that the company has developed promotes the use of renewable aviation fuel with the aid of airport cooperation. The first example of this is the recently announced cooperation with Geneva Airport, and discussions are also ongoing on ten other cooperation projects.
 
First commercial delivery of bioplastics in 2018
Neste is also developing new business operations from bioplastics, the raw materials for which are the renewable products manufactured by Neste. The bioplastics market is expected to grow by more than 40 percent by 2021. About 80 percent of this growth is expected to come from durable biobased plastics, such as Neste’s bioplastics solution, the demand for which is growing faster than for biodegradable plastics. Neste’s bioplastic solution is easy to use, because the properties of the plastics produced are exactly the same in production, use and recycling.
“Our renewable products have already been used in bioplastics production, and our goal is to make the first commercial delivery in the first half of 2018. We are working closely with our customers and plastic manufacturers, and discussions are underway with ten global brands,” says Lievonen.
By 2020, Neste targets to have 20% of its renewable business sales volume from renewable jet fuel, renewable chemicals and bio-based plastics.
Climate Change Sustainable Aviation
 
Source: Neste Corporation

Airbus: ‘BLADE’ laminar flow wing demonstrator makes first flight

sustainable aviation

Aiming for a 50% reduction of wing friction and up to five percent lower CO2 emission

September 26, 2017: Airbus’ A340 laminar-flow “BLADE” test demonstrator aircraft (A340-300 MSN001) has made its successful maiden flight for the EU-sponsored Clean Sky “Blade” project. The aircraft, dubbed “Flight Lab”, took off from the Tarbes aerodrome in southern France at local time 11:00, and after a series of successful tests it landed at Airbus’ facilities in Toulouse Blagnac. The overall flight time was 3hrs/38mins.

The BLADE project – which stands for “Breakthrough Laminar Aircraft Demonstrator in Europe” – is tasked with assessing the feasibility of introducing the technology for commercial aviation. It aims to improve aviation’s ecological footprint, bringing with it a 50% reduction of wing friction and up to five percent lower CO2 emission.

First test aircraft in the world combining a transonic laminar wing profile with a standard aircraft internal primary structure

Airbus’ A340 Flight Lab is the first test aircraft in the world to combine a transonic laminar wing profile with a true internal primary structure. On the outside the aircraft is fitted with two representative transonic laminar outer-wings, while inside the cabin a highly complex specialist flight-test-instrumentation (FTI) station has been installed. The extensive modifications to the A340-300 test-bed aircraft took place during the course of a 16-month working party in Tarbes, with the support of numerous industrial partners across Europe. Today’s first-flight marks the kick-off of the Blade flight-test campaign to explore the wing’s characteristics in flight.

“We began by opening the flight envelope to check that the aircraft was handling correctly,” explains Airbus Flight-Test Engineer, Philippe Seve, who was on board the flight. “We achieved our objective to fly at the design Mach number, at a reasonable altitude and check everything was fine. We also checked that the FTI was working as expected, to identify further fine-tuning for the next flights.”

In the run-up to the start of this flight-testing phase, a small team of 10 specially trained pilots, test engineers and flight test engineers had prepared for this milestone for several months, spending time in a simulator and familiarizing themselves with the FTI systems to be installed on the Airbus flight-test aircraft. Moreover, on equipment installation side, a working party of 70 people performed the FTI installation inside the aircraft, while teams from Bremen, Germany and Broughton, UK worked externally on the outer wings, with a team from Stade Germany, installing a pod containing infrared cameras on the fin.

On the wings, there are hundreds of points to measure the waviness of the surface to help Airbus’ engineers ascertain its influence on the laminarity – which is the first time that Airbus has used such a testing method on an aircraft. Other ‘firsts’ are the use of infrared cameras inside the pod to measure wing temperature and the acoustic generator which measures the influence of acoustics on laminarity. In addition, there is also an innovative reflectometry system, which measures overall deformation in real-time during flight.

A key goal of Blade is to be able to measure the tolerances and imperfections which can be present and still sustain laminarity. To this end, Airbus will simulate every type of imperfection in a controlled manner, so that at the end of the campaign the tolerances for building a laminar wing will be fully known. The flight Lab will perform around 150 flight hours in the coming months.

sustainable aviation

BLADE is organized through Europe’s Clean Sky aeronautical research program. The BLADE project involves 21 European partners with 500 contributors, including GKN Aerospace: designer of the starboard laminar flow wing panel, and Saab: designer of the port wing segment

Source: Airbus

Stuttgart Airport:  C.A.R.E. Diesel Complements Previous Efforts for Climate Protection

sustainable aviation

Ground fleet vehicles fuelled by ‘Neste MY Renewable Diesel’ will improve carbon footprint

Stuttgart, September 21, 2017: Stuttgart Airport has started using Neste MY Renewable Diesel™ as a solution to reduce its CO2 emissions and as part of the climate program of Baden-Württemberg’s state airport in Germany. By switching to premium-quality “drop-in” renewable diesel in its diesel-powered ground fleet, the airport is able to significantly reduce its carbon footprint. All the ground fleet vehicles which are not electrified, such as the trucks of the airport fire department and winter service equipment, will be using Neste MY Renewable Diesel.

Using Neste MY Renewable Diesel, produced from renewable raw materials, can cut greenhouse gas emissions by up to 90% over the lifecycle of the product compared to conventional fossil diesel. Its use can additionally reduce levels of local emissions that have a negative impact on air quality. The fuel outperforms both conventional biodiesel (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester i.e. FAME) and even conventional fossil diesel in terms of engine performance and environmental impact.

“The state airport is the first transportation company in Baden-Württemberg that extensively fuels its vehicle fleet with renewable diesel. The climate-friendly fuel adds to the targeted support of e-mobility and alternative drives on the ground and in the air. This is another important step for climate and health protection”, says Winfried Hermann, Minister of Transport of Baden-Württemberg and Board Chairman of Flughafen Stuttgart GmbH.

Neste MY Renewable Diesel is supplied locally with the brand name C.A.R.E. Diesel® by Neste’s distribution partner Tool Fuel Service GmbH, a company specialized in the distribution of renewable fuel in Germany.

“Our goal of running the entire airport climate-neutrally by 2050 is a very ambitious task. The use of C.A.R.E. Diesel complements our previous efforts for climate protection and our apron staff benefits from it as well”, says Walter Schoefer, Management Director of Flughafen Stuttgart GmbH.

sustainable aviation

Stuttgart Airport ground fleet vehicles fuelled by Neste MY Renewable Diesel Photo: Stuttgart Airport

Source: Neste

British Airways Turning Household Rubbish into Jet Fuel

sustainable aviation

Sustainable fuels will play an increasingly critical role in global aviation

Heathrow, September 18, 2017: British Airways has entered a partnership to design a series of waste plants that convert household waste into renewable jet fuel to power its fleet.

The partnership, with Velocys, a renewable fuels company, is part of the airline’s plans to develop long-term, sustainable fuel options.

The first plant will take hundreds of thousands of tons of household waste per-year, destined for landfill or incineration, including nappies, plastic food containers and chocolate bar wrappers, and convert it into clean-burning, sustainable fuels. This will contribute to the airline’s commitment to reduce net emissions by 50 per cent by 2050.

As well as helping the airline industry reduce its carbon emissions this initiative will also significantly reduce the amount of waste going to landfill. The UK still sends more than 15 million tons of waste per year to landfill sites which not only damages our natural environment but also releases further greenhouse gases (GHG) affecting climate change.

The planned plant will produce enough fuel to power all British Airways’ 787 Dreamliner operated flights from London to San Jose, California and New Orleans, Louisiana for a whole year. It would be the first plant of this scale. The airline plans to supply its aircraft fleet with increasing amounts of sustainable jet fuel in the next decade.

The jet fuel produced at the plant will deliver more than 60 per cent greenhouse gas reduction, compared with conventional fossil fuel, delivering 60,000 tons of CO2 savings every year. This will contribute to both global carbon emissions reductions and local air quality improvements around major airports.

During the past week the Department for Transport has published changes to the Renewable Transport Fuels Obligation (RTFO), and for the first time, sustainable jet fuel will be included in its incentive scheme. These changes to the RTFO are designed to promote sustainable aviation. Once implemented, they are expected to provide long term policy support for this market.

Willie Walsh, IAG chief executive, said: “Sustainable fuels will play an increasingly critical role in global aviation, and we are preparing for that future. Turning household waste into jet fuel is an amazing innovation that produces clean fuel while reducing landfill.”

sustainable aviation

Source: British Airways

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