Dallas Fort Worth Gets EPA Climate Leadership Award

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Superhub plans to increase use of renewable energy and alternative fuels

DFW Airport, Texas, March 2, 2017:  Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) has been selected to receive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Climate Leadership Award for Organizational Leadership. DFW Airport is now the only Airport in the U. S. to be recognized two consecutive years by the EPA in the Climate Leadership Awards program’s six-year history.

The Organizational Leadership Award recognizes organizations that not only have their own comprehensive greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories and aggressive emissions reduction goals, but also exemplify extraordinary leadership in their internal response to climate change, and engagement of their peers, partners, and supply chain.

“Last year, DFW was honored to be the first Airport recipient of the EPA award for Greenhouse Gas Management,” said Sean Donohue, CEO, DFW. “This year’s recognition proves we are committed to responding to climate change and implementing the emissions reduction initiatives we’ve set in place. Our Airport will continue to demonstrate global leadership in sustainability within the industry.”

As part of the U.S. EPA’s commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the EPA’s Climate Protection Partnerships division co-sponsors the Climate Leadership Awards with two partner organizations — the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions and The Climate Registry.  Awardees are honored for exemplary corporate, organizational, and individual leadership in reducing carbon pollution (CO2) and addressing climate change. The awards take place during the Climate Leadership Conference (CLC), which is dedicated to professionals addressing global climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. The conference gathers forward-thinking leaders from business, government, academia, and the non-profit community, to explore energy and climate related solutions, introduce new opportunities, and provide support to leaders taking action on climate change.

DFW Airport plans to continue its reduction initiatives by increasing renewable energy and alternative fuel use; by integrating best available energy-efficient technology into facilities, systems, processes and operations; and, finally, by expanding partnerships with airlines, regulatory agencies, academia, nongovernmental organizations, business associations and other stakeholders to develop effective and sustainable solutions to improve air quality and reduce aviation’s impact on climate change.

DFW Airport welcomes more than 65 million customers along their journey every year, elevating DFW to a status as one of the most frequently visited superhub airports in the world.  DFW Airport customers can choose among 163 domestic and 55 international nonstop destinations worldwide.

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DFW Airport welcomes more than 65 million customers every year
Photo: DFW Airport

Source: Dallas Fort Worth International Airport

Joule: Award-winning CO2-to-Fuel Process

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Regulatory milestones set up for commercial success

 

Bedford, MA, April 6, 2016: Joule, a pioneer of drop-in liquid fuels from recycled CO2, announced major accomplishments in the first quarter of 2016 that are accelerating the commercialization of environmentally sustainable ultra-low carbon fuel. These advancements include EPA approval of Joule’s Sunflow®-E ethanol process as an advanced biofuel and technical breakthroughs of Joule’s award-winning CO2-to-fuel process.

To make its Sunflow-E ethanol, which is chemically identical to traditional ethanol, Joule converts CO2 to ethanol directly in a continuous process, using engineered bacteria as living catalysts rather than biomass feedstocks. Following a rigorous vetting process, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has qualified Joule’s Sunflow-E ethanol pathway for generating advanced biofuel (D-code 5) RINs under the Clean Air Act (CAA).

Under the CAA and the Renewable Fuel Standard, advanced biofuels must reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by more than 50 percent when compared to traditional petroleum based fuels. In the EPA’s analysis, Joule’s Sunflow-E was found to reduce lifecycle GHG emissions by a whopping 85 percent, significantly above the required threshold.

This recognition from the EPA validates Joule’s mission to create carbon-neutral fuels for a sustainable tomorrow, and follows the 2015 announcement that Joule’s Sunflow-E ethanol was registered by the EPA for commercial use. Further details on Joule’s helioculture process and the EPA’s analysis can be found in the full report, located here.

“Following strong momentum in 2015, we’re pleased to start this year off in such a productive manner, with some major highlights on the technical and regulatory front,” said Brian Baynes, Joule CEO. “The qualification from the EPA allows Joule to compete with other forms of ethanol and provides our customers and partners with the full benefit of renewable fuels from a cost, production and environmental standpoint.”

About Joule: Joule develops technology platforms for the production of sustainable, drop-in, ultra-low carbon transportation fuels. The company has pioneered a direct CO2-to-fuel production platform, effectively reversing combustion through the use of solar energy. This platform applies engineered catalysts to continuously convert waste CO2 directly into renewable fuels such as ethanol or hydrocarbons for diesel, jet fuel, and gasoline. The proprietary, scaled-down microchannel biomass-to-liquid process adds an indirect CO2 to liquid conversion capability. Flexible to utilize a variety of feedstocks, geographies, and climates, Joule’s processes enable unrivaled scalability and volume at ever reducing costs. Joule is privately held and has raised over $200 million in funding to date, led by Flagship Ventures. The company operates from Bedford in Massachusetts and Fort Collins in Colorado with production operations in Hobbs, New Mexico and in Lakeview, Oregon.

Source: Joule

Boeing Recognized by EPA for Conservation Efforts

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Reduced energy consumption while increasing aircraft deliveries

Chicago, March 28, 2016: Boeing will be recognized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with a 2016 ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year – Sustained Excellence Award for the company’s continued leadership in protecting the environment through superior energy efficiency. Boeing will receive the award April 13 in Washington, D.C. This is the sixth consecutive year Boeing has been recognized by ENERGY STAR.

“Recognition by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ENERGY STAR program for sustained excellence is a tribute to our employees’ commitment to environmental leadership,” said Ursula English, Boeing vice president of Environment, Health & Safety. “We’re inspired to keep embedding energy conservation technologies into our processes and operations.”

Kim Newton, director of Operational Excellence for Boeing Shared Services Group will accept the ENERGY STAR award on behalf of Boeing.

“Our partnership with ENERGY STAR has provided guidance to achieve continued improvements in our energy efficiency,” Newton said. “We are on track to meet our environmental targets of zero growth by 2017 in greenhouse gas emissions, even while increasing production rates and adding new manufacturing facilities.”

During 2015, Boeing improved energy efficiency, invested in key energy infrastructure and continued public outreach with its conservation message. Boeing’s key 2015 accomplishments in the U.S. include:

  • Reduced absolute energy consumption by 4.3 percent while increasing aircraft deliveries by over 10 percent.
  • Achieved absolute energy reduction of 603,000 MMBtu, equivalent to the annual energy for 15,900 average U.S. homes.
  • Reduced energy intensity by 6.7 percent, a cumulative improvement of 37 percent since 2009.
  • Made direct energy conservation investment of $7.7 million, reducing energy use by over 41,500 MMBtu annually.
  • Achieved additional annual energy savings of more than 16,300 MMBtu through designing efficiency into capital improvements.
  • Expanded the company environmental engagement platform ‘Build a Better Planet’ to include more information on energy, water conservation and recycling efforts to inspire replication.
  • Shared energy conservation messaging in key forums and conferences such as Net Impact.
  • Commissioned a new chiller plant at the Everett, Wash., site to support the world’s largest building by volume gaining a 36 percent efficiency improvement.

“By continued collaboration with ENERGY STAR, Boeing is helping Americans save money, save energy, and do their part to reduce our nation’s greenhouse gas emissions that exacerbate climate change,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “I’m proud to recognize Boeing with the highest form of ENERGY STAR recognition, as the winner of the 2016 Partner of the Year – Sustained Excellence Award. Boeing demonstrates a strong commitment to energy efficiency and to preserving a healthy planet for future generations.”

The 2016 Partner of the Year – Sustained Excellence Awards are given to a variety of organizations to recognize their contributions to reducing harmful carbon pollution through superior energy efficiency efforts. These awards recognize ongoing leadership across the ENERGY STAR program, including energy-efficient products, services, new homes, and buildings in the commercial, industrial, and public sectors.

Source: Boeing

United Technologies Receives U.S. National Climate Leadership Award

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Geared Turbofan: 16 percent improvement in fuel efficiency

Farmington, Conn., March 18, 2016: United Technologies Corp. has received a 2016 Climate Leadership Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

UTC was recognized in the Excellence in Greenhouse Gas Management category for Goal Achievement in meeting its annual greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets. By the end of 2015, the company reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 930,000 metric tons compared to a 2006 baseline, or the equivalent of removing nearly 196,000 cars from the road for one year.

“Since 1997, UTC has tripled its revenues while reducing greenhouse gases 34 percent, demonstrating that sustainability works,” said United Technologies Chief Sustainability Officer John Mandyck. “For more than three decades, we’ve taken a comprehensive approach to incorporate sustainability into our products, operations and culture. We’re honored to receive this recognition, and proud to continue these efforts as outlined in our 2020 sustainability goals.”

UTC’s 2020 sustainability goals encompass business operations, products and suppliers. The 2020 sustainability goals target a further 25 percent reduction in water usage and a further 15 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from current levels over the next five years. This places the company on a trajectory for an 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, in line with United Nations targets.

In addition to reducing greenhouse gases in its operations, UTC is innovating with new sustainable products, such as its Geared Turbofan jet engine that sets a new benchmark with a 16 percent improvement in fuel efficiency.

“I am proud to distinguish United Technologies for its outstanding actions and dedication to reduce harmful carbon pollution that leads to climate change,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy.

United Technologies Corp., based in Farmington, Connecticut, provides high-technology systems and services to the building and aerospace industries. To learn more about UTC, visit the UTC website or follow on Twitter: @UTC.

Source: UTC

EPA’s higher than expected renewable fuel volume requirements

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Neste welcomes US EPA’s higher than expected renewable fuel volume requirements

Keilaranta, Finland, December 1, 2015: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the US published the final ruling covering renewable fuel volume requirements retrospectively for 2014 and prospectively for 2015 and 2016 on 30 November 2015. EPA also finalized the volume requirement for biomass-based diesel for 2017.

Volume requirements are set separately for different types of biofuels. Neste’s NEXBTL renewable diesel meets the requirements of an advanced biofuel in the biomass-based diesel category (D4). Volume requirements for biomass-based diesel for 2015, 2016, and 2017 are higher than the ones proposed by the EPA in May 2015.  More information on the volume requirements is available at EPA’s website.

“We are pleased to see EPA taking steps towards a more forward-looking rulemaking in setting renewable fuel volume requirements. This provides important predictability and stability for our business”, says Kaisa Hietala, Executive Vice President of Neste’s Renewable Products business area.

“The US continues to be an important market for Neste and our NEXBTL renewable diesel. The increase in requirement for advanced biofuels is in line with our expectations. We agree that growing volume requirement on the advanced biofuels is the right way to go as they provide greater greenhouse gas reductions and are a very effective way to reach carbon emission reduction targets”, continues Hietala.

Neste’s NEXBTL renewable diesel is an ideal low-carbon fuel for US refiners, blenders, and fuel distributors to meet their renewable fuel standard obligations, as it is fully compatible with existing fuel distribution systems. NEXBTL renewable diesel is also increasingly being used by US cities (e.g. City of Oakland and City of Walnut Creek) and corporations (e.g. UPS and Google) to reduce their carbon footprint.

Source: Neste Corporation

Economics of Biofuels

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U. S. Policy Paper of the National Center for Environmental Economics NCEE

 

Washington, D.C.: Replacing fossil fuels with biofuels—fuels produced from renewable organic material—has the potential to reduce some undesirable aspects of fossil fuel production and use, including conventional and greenhouse gas (GHG) pollutant emissions, exhaustible resource depletion, and dependence on unstable foreign suppliers. Demand for biofuels could also increase farm income. On the other hand, because many biofuel feedstocks require land, water, and other resources, research suggests that biofuel production may give rise to several undesirable effects. Potential drawbacks include changes to land use patterns that may increase GHG emissions, pressure on water resources, air and water pollution, and increased food costs. Depending on the feedstock and production process and time horizon of the analysis, biofuels can emit even more GHGs than some fossil fuels on an energy-equivalent basis. Biofuels also tend to require subsidies and other market interventions to compete economically with fossil fuels, which creates deadweight losses in the economy.

Background

  • First generation biofuels are made from sugar crops (sugarcane, sugarbeet), starch crops (corn, sorghum), oilseed crops (soybean, canola), and animal fats. Sugar and starch crops are converted through a fermentation process to form bioalcohols, including ethanol, butanol, and propanol. Oils and animal fats can be processed into biodiesel. Ethanol is the most widely used bioalcohol fuel. Most vehicles can use gasoline-ethanol blends containing up to 10 percent ethanol (by volume). Flexible fuel vehicles can use E85, a gasoline-ethanol blend containing up to 85 percent ethanol. There were more than 2300 E85 fueling stations located throughout the US in 2013 (US Department of Energy).
  • Second generation biofuels, or cellulosic biofuels, are made from cellulose, which is available from non-food crops and waste biomass such as corn stover, corncobs, straw, wood, and wood byproducts. Third generation biofuels use algae as a feedstock. Commercial cellulosic biofuel production began in the US in 2013, while algae biofuels are not yet produced commercially.

Potential Economic Benefits of Biofuel Production

Replacing fossil fuels with biofuels has the potential to generate a number of benefits. In contrast to fossil fuels, which are exhaustible resources, biofuels are produced from renewable feedstocks. Thus, their production and use could, in theory, be sustained indefinitely.

While the production of biofuels results in GHG emissions at several stages of the process, EPA’s (2010) analysis of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) projected that several types of biofuels could yield lower lifecycle GHG emissions than gasoline over a 30 year time horizon. Academic studies using other economic models have also found that biofuels can lead to reductions in lifecycle GHG emissions relative to conventional fuels (Hertel et al. 2010, Huang et al. 2013).

  • Second and third generation biofuels have significant potential to reduce GHG emissions relative to conventional fuels because feedstocks can be produced using marginal land. Moreover, in the case of waste biomass, no additional agricultural production is required, and indirect market-mediated GHG emissions can be minimal if the wastes have no other productive uses.

Biofuels can be produced domestically, which could lead to lower fossil fuel imports (Huang et al. 2013). If biofuel production and use reduces our consumption of imported fossil fuels, we may become less vulnerable to the adverse impacts of supply disruptions (US EPA 2010). Reducing our demand for petroleum could also reduce its price, generating economic benefits for American consumers, but also potentially increasing petroleum consumption abroad (Huang et al. 2013).

Biofuels may reduce some pollutant emissions. Ethanol, in particular, can ensure complete combustion, reducing carbon monoxide emissions (US EPA 2010).

It is important to note that biofuel production and consumption, in and of itself, will not reduce GHG or conventional pollutant emissions, lessen petroleum imports, or alleviate pressure on exhaustible resources. Biofuel production and use must coincide with reductions in the production and use of fossil fuels for these benefits to accrue. These benefits would be mitigated if biofuel emissions and resource demands augment, rather than displace, those of fossil fuels.

Potential Economic Disbenefits and Impacts of Biofuel Production

Biofuel feedstocks include many crops that would otherwise be used for human consumption directly, or indirectly as animal feed. Diverting these crops to biofuels may lead to more land area devoted to agriculture, increased use of polluting inputs, and higher food prices. Cellulosic feedstocks can also compete for resources (land, water, fertilizer, etc.) that could otherwise be devoted to food production. As a result, some research suggests that biofuel production may give rise to several undesirable developments.

Changes in land use patterns may increase GHG emissions by releasing terrestrial carbon stocks to the atmosphere (Searchinger et al. 2008). Biofuel feedstocks grown on land cleared from tropical forests, such as soybeans in the Amazon and oil palm in Southeast Asia, generate particularly high GHG emissions (Fargione et al. 2008). Even use of cellulosic feedstocks can spur higher crop prices that encourage the expansion of agriculture into undeveloped land, leading to GHG emissions and biodiversity losses (Melillo et al. 2009).

Biofuel production and processing practices can also release GHGs. Fertilizer application releases nitrous oxide (NOX), a potent greenhouse gas. Most biorefineries operate using fossil fuels. Some research suggests that GHG emissions resulting from biofuel production and use, including those from indirect land use change, may be higher than those generated by fossil fuels, depending on the time horizon of the analysis (Melillo et al. 2009, Mosnier et al. 2013).

Regarding non-GHG environmental impacts, research suggests that production of biofuel feedstocks, particularly food crops like corn and soy, could increase water pollution from nutrients, pesticides, and sediment (NRC 2011). Increases in irrigation and ethanol refining could deplete aquifers (NRC 2011). Air quality could also decline in some regions if the impact of biofuels on tailpipe emissions plus the additional emissions generated at biorefineries increases net conventional air pollution (NRC 2011).

Economic models show that biofuel use can result in higher crop prices, though the range of estimates in the literature is wide. For example, a 2013 study found projections for the effect of biofuels on corn prices in 2015 ranging from a 5 to a 53 percent increase (Zhang et al. 2013). The National Research Council’s (2011) report on the RFS included several studies finding a 20 to 40 percent increase in corn prices from biofuels during 2007 to 2009. An NCEE working paper found a 2 to 3 percent increase in long-run corn prices for each billion gallon increase in corn ethanol production on average across 19 studies (Condon et al. 2013). Higher crop prices lead to higher food prices, though impacts on retail food in the US are expected to be small (NRC 2011). Higher crop prices may lead to higher rates of malnutrition in developing countries (Rosegrant et al. 2008, Fischer et al. 2009).

U.S. Policy Approaches to Support Biofuel Production

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 used a variety of economic incentives, including grants, income tax credits, subsidies and loans to promote biofuel research and development. It established a Renewable Fuel Standard mandating the blending of 7.5 billion gallons of renewable fuels with gasoline annually by 2012.

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) (PDF, 310 pp., 828K, About PDF) included similar economic incentives. EISA expanded the Renewable Fuel Standard to increase biofuel production to 36 billion gallons by 2022. Of the latter goal, 21 billion gallons must come from cellulosic biofuel or advanced biofuels derived from feedstocks other than cornstarch. To limit GHG emissions, the Act states that conventional renewable fuels (corn starch ethanol) are required to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions relative to life-cycle emissions from fossil fuels by at least 20 percent, biodiesel and advanced biofuels must reduce GHG emissions by 50 percent, and cellulosic biofuels must reduce emissions by 60 percent. EISA also provides cash awards, grants, subsidies, and loans for research and development, biorefineries that displace more than 80 percent of fossil fuels used to operate the refinery, and commercial applications of cellulosic biofuel.

In addition to EISA, numerous other policies have encouraged the production and use of biofuels in the US in recent decades. Tax credits currently support advanced biofuels, including cellulosic and biodiesel.

References

Condon, N., H. Klemick, and A .Wolverton. 2013. “Impacts of Ethanol Policy on Corn Prices: A Review and Meta-Analysis of Recent Evidence.” NCEE Working Paper 2013-05. http://yosemite.epa.gov/EE/epa/eed.nsf/WPNumber/2013-05?OpenDocument (Accessed Sept. 12, 2013)

Hertel, T., A. Golub, A. Jones, M. O’Hare, R. Plevin, and D. Kammen. 2010. “Effects of US Maize Ethanol on Global Land Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Estimating Market-mediated Responses.” BioScience 60: 223–231.

Fargione, J., et al. 2008. “Land clearing and the biofuel carbon debt.” Science 319: 1235–1238.

Fischer, G., E. Hizsnyik, S. Prieler, M. Shah, and H. van Velthuizen. 2009. Biofuels and Food Security. OPEC Fund for International Development.

Huang, H., M. Khanna, H. Onal, and X. Chen. 2013. “Stacking low carbon policies on the renewable fuels standard: Economic and greenhouse gas implications.” Energy Policy 56 (May 2013): 5-15.

Melillo, J., J. Reilly, D. Kickligher, A. Gurgel, T. Cronin, S. Paltsev, B. Felzer, X. Wang, A. Sokolov, and C.A. Schlosser. 2009. “Indirect Emissions from Biofuels: How Important?” Science 326 (5958): 1397-1399.

Mosnier, A. P. Havlik, H. Valin, J. Baker, B. Murray, S. Feng, M. Obersteiner, B. McCarl, S. Rose, and U. Schneider. 2013. “The Net Global Effects of Alternative U.S. Biofuel Mandates: Fossil Fuel Displacement, Indirect Land Use Change, and the Role of Agricultural Productivity Growth.” Energy Policy 57 (June 2013): 602-614.

National Research Council. 2011. Committee on Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increasing Biofuels Production. Renewable Fuel Standard: Potential Economic and Environmental Effects of U.S. Biofuel Policy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Rosegrant, M.W, T. Zhu, S. Msangi, T. Sulser. 2008. “Global Scenarios for Biofuels. Impacts and Implications.” Review of Agricultural Economics, 30(3), 495-505.

Searchinger, T., et al. 2008. “Use of US croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gases through emissions from land-use change.” Science 319: 1238-1240.

US Department of Energy, Alternative Fuels Data Center. Ethanol Fueling Station Locations. http://www.afdc.energy.gov/fuels/ethanol_locations.html (Accessed Sept. 10, 2013)

US Environmental Protection Agency. 2010. Renewable Fuel Standard Program (RFS2) Regulatory Impact Analysis. http://www.epa.gov/otaq/renewablefuels/420r10006.pdf (PDF) (Accessed Sept. 10, 2013).

Zhang, W., E. Yu, S. Rozelle, J. Yang, and S. Msangi. 2013. “The impact of biofuel growth on agriculture: Why is the range of estimates so wide?” Food Policy 38: 227–239.

For further information, please visit: http://yosemite.epa.gov/EE%5Cepa%5Ceed.nsf/webpages/Biofuels.html

Boeing: Recycled Carbon Fiber for Permeable Pavement

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New research project to investigate use of recycled carbon fiber composites

Seattle, Nov. 6, 2015: Boeing, Washington State University, and the Washington Stormwater Center announced today that they will collaborate to research and develop stronger permeable pavement through the use of recycled carbon fiber composite material.

Improving permeable pavement – a porous concrete or asphalt product that allows stormwater to seep into the ground instead of running off to waterways – has been identified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a positive step to mitigating stormwater issues in Washington state. According to the EPA, permeable pavement improves water quality by reducing flow, filtering pollutants and returning water back to the water table.

Boeing is supporting the Washington Stormwater Center through a $212,000 research grant and donation of carbon fiber composite material. The grant will support research programs at the Washington State University (WSU) Research and Extension Center in Puyallup, Wash., and on the WSU Pullman campus.

“Water is one of our most precious resources, and we need to treat it as such,” said Ursula English, vice president, Boeing Environment, Health & Safety. “We are pleased to provide recyclable composite material from our production line to assist in this vital and innovative research. Creating the opportunity to expand the use of permeable pavement is good for the environment and the communities in which we live and work.”

The project will take a two-pronged approach to improving permeable pavement. First, scientists will recycle carbon fiber composites to strengthen and reinforce porous pavement material, which is used in parking lots and side roads, but is currently too soft to be used on heavily-traveled roadways. Then the team will examine the strengthened material for toxicity, to validate that the composite material does not add pollutants into the soil or impact water quality.

“We are excited to work with Boeing on this important project,” said John Stark, director of the Washington Stormwater Center. “If we find that this material safely strengthens permeable pavement, resulting in an increase in its use, this could be a game changer in terms of reducing the impact of pollutants in stormwater on the environment.”

The use of permeable pavement is a Best Management Practice (BMP) recommended by the EPA. Washington State requires that low-impact development (techniques used to manage stormwater runoff from landscaping after a storm) must be used wherever feasible in western Washington – and permeable pavement is one avenue to achieving that goal. It’s also key to “green stormwater infrastructure,” also promoted by the EPA.

Boeing is an industry leader in global collaboration on environmental issues important to aerospace and our communities, such as researching the use of innovative technology to help solve challenges such as stormwater runoff.

Source: Boeing

EPA Registration for CO2-Recycled Ethanol

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Joule Achieves U.S. EPA Registration for CO2-Recycled Ethanol

Bedford, Mass, September 30, 2015: Joule, the pioneer of liquid fuels from recycled CO2, today announced that its fuel grade Sunflow®-E ethanol has been registered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for commercial use in E10 and E15 gasoline blends.

“We are approaching commercialization with a technology that is first of its kind, able to convert CO2 directly into multiple drop-in fuels. It is critical to prove its readiness by meeting government and industry requirements. Having secured EPA registration, our fuel grade Sunflow-E ethanol is now cleared for use,” said Serge Tchuruk, President and CEO of Joule.

Earlier this year Joule announced the successful third-party testing of Sunflow-E ethanol, confirming its ability to meet the following standards:

  • American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D4806 – Denatured fuel ethanol for blending with gasolines for use as automotive spark-ignition engine fuel
  • German Institute for Standardization (DIN) EN 15376 – Ethanol as a blending component for petrol

Joule Sunflow-E ethanol is chemically identical to its traditional counterparts, but differs in the way it is produced. Joule converts CO2 to ethanol directly in a continuous process, using engineered bacteria as living catalysts rather than biomass feedstocks.  At full-scale commercialization, Joule ultimately targets productivity of up to 25,000 gallons of Sunflow-E ethanol per acre annually.

“Following a full year of production at our demonstration plant, we have achieved a several-fold advance in outdoor productivity. Additionally, we have reached unprecedented levels in our lab reactors, and we know the steps required to replicate these results outdoors. This will further strengthen our position to initiate global deployment,” said Mr. Tchuruk.

About Joule: Joule has pioneered a CO2-to-fuel production platform, effectively reversing combustion through the use of solar energy. The company’s platform applies engineered catalysts to continuously convert waste CO2 directly into renewable fuels such as ethanol or hydrocarbons for diesel, jet fuel and gasoline. Free of feedstock constraints and complex processing, Joule’s process can achieve unrivaled scalability, volumes and costs without the use of any agricultural land, fresh water or crops. Joule is privately held and has raised over $200 million in funding to date, led by Flagship Ventures. The company operates from Bedford, Massachusetts and The Hague, The Netherlands with production operations in Hobbs, New Mexico. Additional information is available at www.jouleunlimited.com.

Source: Joule