Boeing’s 787-10 Dreamliner Cleared for Commercial Service by FAA

sustainable aviation

25 % better fuel per seat and emissions than current airplanes

Everett, Wash., Jan. 22, 2018: Boeing announced today the 787-10 Dreamliner received an amended type certificate (ATC) from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), clearing the airplane for commercial service.

The awarding of ATC caps a successful flight test program that began in March 2017 and involved three flight test airplanes that accumulated about 900 test hours. Boeing’s flight test program team took the airplanes through a series of tests to confirm the airplane’s handling, systems and overall performance met internal requirements and certification standards to ensure safety of flight.

Other aviation regulatory agencies are expected to follow the FAA’s lead and certify the airplane before it enters service.

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is a family of super-efficient airplanes with new passenger-pleasing features. As a stretch of the 787-9, the 787-10 retains over 95 percent commonality while adding seats and cargo capacity, setting a new benchmark for fuel efficiency and operating economics at 25 percent better fuel per seat and emissions than the airplanes it will replace. The airplane can fly 330 passengers, in a typical two-class configuration, up to 6,430 nautical miles (11,910 km).

To date, Boeing has over 170 orders for the 787-10 from nine customers worldwide. First delivery is expected to Singapore Airlines in the first half of 2018.

sustainable aviation

Boeing Flight Test & Evaluation, Boeing Field, Seattle, Flight Test, 787-10 Dreamliner, ZC001, Test 004-04, Flutter, puffy clouds, Eastern washington

Source: Boeing

Boeing 737 MAX 8 Earns FAA Certification

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

First 737 MAX family member on track for customer deliveries 

Renton, Wash., March 9, 2017: Boeing announced today that FAA has certified the 737 MAX 8 airplane for commercial service. Boeing is now in the final stages of preparing for the first 737 MAX 8 delivery to customers in the coming months.

To earn certification for the 737 MAX 8, Boeing undertook a comprehensive test program that began just over one year ago with four airplanes, plus ground and laboratory testing. Following a rigorous certification process, the FAA granted Boeing an Amended Type Certificate for the 737 MAX 8, verifying the design complies with required aviation regulations and is safe and reliable.

The 737 MAX 8 is the first in the family to be developed and meets customer demand in the heart of the single-aisle market. The 737 MAX 8 reduces fuel use and CO2 emissions by an additional 14 percent over today’s most fuel-efficient single-aisle airplanes.

The 737 MAX family of aircraft is designed to offer customers exceptional performance, flexibility and efficiency, with lower per-seat costs and an extended range that will open up new destinations in the single-aisle market. The MAX 8 and 9 will be followed in 2019 by the smaller MAX 7 and higher capacity MAX 200, while studies and discussion continue with customers on growing the family.

The 737 MAX incorporates the latest technology CFM International LEAP-1B engines, Advanced Technology winglets and other improvements to deliver the highest efficiency, reliability and passenger comfort in the single-aisle market. It is the fastest-selling airplane in Boeing history, accumulating more than 3,600 orders to date from 83 customers worldwide.

Source: Boeing

A321neo powered by CFM LEAP-1A engines receives type certification

sustainable aviation

Toulouse,  March 1, 2017:  Following a comprehensive flight test program, the Airbus A321neo powered by CFM International’s LEAP-1A engines has been granted joint Type Certification from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

The EASA Type Certificate was signed by EASA’s Certification Director Trevor Woods and Michael J. Kaszycki FAA’s acting Manager Transport Airplane Directorate – Aircraft Certification Service. Both certificates were handed over to Airbus  Senior Vice President  A320 Family Program, Klaus Roewe and Airbus A320 Family Program Chief Engineer, Pierre-Henri Brousse.
“The A321neo offers operators the perfect balance between fuel efficiency, comfort and environmental performance. It is the clear market leader in the 200 plus seat category,” said Fabrice Brégier, President of Airbus Commercial Aircraft.” Today’s certification is a rewarding tribute to all the teams who have been instrumental in achieving this essential milestone.”

A321neo

The A321neo powered by CFM engines, successfully completed a certification program accumulating over 400 flight hours in more than 160 flights. The tests validated the aircraft airframe and systems well beyond their design limits to meet all airworthiness criteria. The A321neo with CFM engines is the fourth member of the NEO Family certified over the last 15 months, giving customers of the A320neo Family the option of two engine types; Pratt & Whitney’s Pure Power PW1100G-JM and CFM’s LEAP-1A.
sustainable aviation

Source: Airbus

NASA: Prototype Air Traffic Tool Ready for Airborne Workout

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New sustainable ‘Flight Deck Interval Management’ system to save fuel, flight time and money

 

Seattle, February 2, 2017: In a series of flights called Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration-1  (ATD-1), NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate is testing airborne flight deck interval management software with the help of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and leading aviation partners.

The month-long campaign involves three planes: a Boeing 757 and a business jet – either a Dassault Falcon 900 or an Embraer 170 – supplied by Honeywell, and a Boeing 737 provided by United Airlines. The aircraft are based at King County International and Seattle-Tacoma International Airports in Seattle, but the flight test will take place about 120 miles east, over Grant County International Airport.

After years of research and laboratory work, a full airborne demonstration of new technology and procedures aimed at improving air traffic flow into busy airports is on schedule to take off this month over Washington State.

The system is called Flight Deck Interval Management, or FIM, and its key benefit is that it will help air traffic controllers and pilots more precisely manage and safely shorten the time, or interval, between airplanes landing on a runway.

“All the pilots that are going to be flying the FIM operations have gone through the training modules and simulations. The equipment is all set and we’re ready to go,” said Sheri Brown, ATD-1 project manager at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia.

The research is intended to help airplanes spend less time in the air, save money on fuel, and reduce engine emissions – all the while improving schedule efficiency to help passengers arrive at their destination on time and avoid missing connecting flights.

FIM is the final piece of a suite of aircraft arrival technology developed under the ATD-1-program. Two other NASA-developed technologies from ATD-1 – Traffic Management Advisor with Terminal Metering and Controller Managed Spacing – together were already  delivered to the FAA in 2014 as a single tool known as Terminal Sequencing and Spacing (TSAS).

Information provided to air traffic controllers from TSAS will be combined with NASA-developed software that is at the heart of FIM. The result is guidance that directs pilots to fly at a certain speed and maintain a more precise spacing with an aircraft flying ahead of them all the way down to the runway.

“It’s a very simple ‘follow the leader’ operation that is easy to execute by the flight crew,” Sheri Brown said. During the course of the flight tests, researchers hope to complete some 80 runs involving three major flight scenarios:

  • flying at a cruise altitude of 35,000 feet,
  • descending from cruise altitude all the way down to the airport, and
  • making a final approach beginning about 15 minutes before touchdown.

The plan is to fly about five-and-a-half hours each weekday, testing up to five test scenarios during each daily sortie. The Honeywell 757 and United 737 will be equipped with the FIM system in its cockpits, where its pilots will “follow the leader” during test runs behind the Honeywell business jet, which will provide its speed and position information to the other aircraft.

sustainable aviation

(l to r) Jason McMahon, Helmuth Eggeling and Scott Nyberg — lead test pilots from Honeywell Aerospace’s Flight Ops engineering organization – take part in final checkouts of the ATD-1 technologies and flight plans.
Credits: NASA / David C. Bowman

If all goes well with the demonstration, the entire FIM system – including software and hardware – will be turned over to the FAA by the fall of 2017, where the FAA will continue to evaluate and test it before making a decision to certify its use.

Source: NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate / Jim Banke, Lillian Gipson

United Airlines Honored as ‘Eco-Airline of the Year’

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Highest recognition from ‘Air Transport World’ magazine for its leadership in environmental action

Chicago, January 24, 2017: For the second time since launching its industry-leading Eco-Skies program, United Airlines was named the Eco-Airline of the Year by Air Transport World (ATW) magazine. The award recognizes an airline in global commercial aviation for its environmental leadership as demonstrated by consistent and impactful environmental action within the company and in the industry. The magazine awarded United with the top honor for multiple initiatives in 2016 and prior years, including becoming the first U.S. airline to begin using commercial-scale volumes of sustainable aviation biofuel for regularly scheduled flights, marking a significant milestone in the industry by moving beyond demonstrations and test programs to the use of low-carbon biofuels for ongoing operations.

“Innovation and sustainability are twin engines that drive our progress as the most environmentally conscious airline in the world,” said Oscar Munoz, United’s chief executive officer. “From pioneering investments in biofuels to increasing efficiency and reducing waste to supporting a single global market based measure for carbon emissions, United is committed to innovating solutions that we hope will become the expectation for our industry, not the exception. And while we take great pride in this important recognition for our efforts, the measure of our success is the opinion of our children and grandchildren who will look back on our efforts and say that we lived up to our obligations to them in protecting the planet for future generations.”

United’s Eco-Skies program represents the company’s commitment to the environment and the actions taken every day to create a sustainable future. In addition to incorporating sustainable biofuel into its operations at Los Angeles International Airport, United’s recent environmental achievements include:

  • Investing $30 million in U.S.-based alternative aviation fuels developer Fulcrum BioEnergy, Inc., which represented the single largest investment by any airline globally in alternative fuels.
  • Becoming the first U.S. airline to repurpose items from the carrier’s international premium cabin amenity kits and partnering with Clean the World to donate hygiene products to those in critical need.
  • Partnering with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to demonstrate the potential benefits of new satellite-based technology for instrument landings that enable aircraft to use fuel more efficiently on arrival and land at normal rates in challenging weather.
  • Continuing to replace its eligible ground equipment and service vehicles with cleaner, electrically powered alternatives, with 47 percent of the fleet converted to date.
  • Becoming the first airline to fly with Boeing’s Split Scimitar winglets, which reduce fuel consumption by up to 2 percent; United is the largest Split Scimitar winglet customer today.
  • Being the only U.S.-based airline named to the Carbon Disclosure Project’s “Leadership” category for its environmental disclosure, with an A- Climate score in 2016.
  • Sourcing illy coffee’s internationally certified supply chain of farmers who earn above-market prices in exchange for meeting quality and sustainability standards for the finest coffee.
  • Offering Eco-Skies CarbonChoice, the airline industry’s only integrated carbon offset program for corporate business travel and cargo shipments.

Additionally, as part of United’s commitment to operating an environmentally friendly and responsible airline, the carrier added a carbon footprint measurement to its 2017 Global Performance Commitment. United is committing to achieving a lower gross carbon footprint than its two largest U.S.-based competitors this year, as measured by carbon dioxide-equivalent per available seat-mile. If United does not meet the goals of its 2017 Global Performance Commitment, the airline will compensate eligible corporate accounts.

sustainable aviation with IASA

Equipped with new LEAP-1B engines from CFM International and improvements such as the Advanced Technology Winglet, the 737MAX reduces fuel burn and CO2 emissions by 13 percent

For more information on United’s Eco-Skies commitment to the environment, visit www.united.com/ecoskies.

Source: United Airlines

Vanilla Aircraft Claims World Record with 56-hour Flight

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Multispectral imaging payload as a demonstration of Earth science and agricultural remote sensing

 
Falls Church, VA, January 3, 2017:  Vanilla Aircraft today announced that on December 2, their VA001 unmanned aircraft system (UAS) completed a non-stop, unrefueled 56-hour flight. The flight was submitted for a world duration record for combustion-powered unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in the 50-500 kg subclass (Fédération Aéronautique Internationale, FAI, Class U-1.c, Group 1). A representative from the National Aeronautic Association was present to witness the record.
The flight, planned as a 120-hour mission, was ended early due to forecasted severe icing and range restrictions. However, the airplane landed with enough JP-8 fuel on board for an additional 90 hours of flying, or enough for a total of six days of flight.
The flight was supported by the technology innovation investments of the Department of U.S. Defense’s Rapid Reaction Technology Office (RRTO) and DARPA-funded efforts through Naval Air System Command (NAVAIR 4.11 – Patuxent River). Originating and ending at Las Cruces International Airport, the flight was conducted under the authority of the New Mexico State University UAS test site designated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).
“This effort represents tremendous and unprecedented coordination among civil, defense, academic, and private industry to bring a heretofore only imagined capability to reality,” said Vanilla Aircraft CEO Rear Adm. Timothy Heely (ret.).
The airplane carried 20 pounds of actual and simulated payload, flying at 6,500 to 7,500 feet above mean sea level (MSL), and was a further step for the VA001 towards demonstrating the system’s objective performance of carrying a 30-pound payload for 10 days at an altitude of 15,000 feet. The payload included a NAVAIR-provided relay and operated continuously throughout the flight to demonstrate functionality out to the maximum range. The airplane also carried a NASA-provided multispectral imaging payload as a demonstration of Earth science and agricultural remote sensing.
“The VA001 would be a cost-effective option for widespread and regular low-level surveying. We could fill a wide cost and payload-capability market gap between small electric and large military unmanned aircraft, which is perfect for many commercial applications,” says co-founder and program manager Jeremy Novara. Vanilla is currently exploring strategic partnerships and equity financing to expand into this market. 
Source: Vanilla Aircraft

FAA: New Certification Standards Will Enhance Small Airplane Safety

Supporting aviation industry innovation in the coming years

Washington, D.C.,  December 16, 2016: The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today issued a final rule that overhauls the airworthiness standards for small general aviation airplanes. This innovative rule will reduce the time it takes to move safety enhancing technologies for small airplanes into the marketplace and will also reduce costs for the aviation industry.

“Aviation manufacturing is our nation’s top export and general aviation alone contributes approximately $80 billion and 400,000 jobs to our economy,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “The FAA’s rule replaces prescriptive design requirements with performance-based standards, which will reduce costs and leverage innovation without sacrificing safety.”

FAA’s new Part 23 rule (PDF) establishes performance-based standards for airplanes that weigh less than 19,000 pounds with 19 or fewer seats and recognizes consensus-based compliance methods for specific designs and technologies. It also adds new certification standards to address general aviation loss of control accidents and in-flight icing conditions.

“The rule is a model of what we can accomplish for American competitiveness when government and industry work together and demonstrates that we can simultaneously enhance safety and reduce burdens on industry,” said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta.

The rule responds to the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 and the Small Airplane Revitalization Act of 2013, which directed the FAA to streamline the approval of safety advancements for small general aviation aircraft. It also addresses recommendations from the FAA’s 2013 Part 23 Reorganization Aviation Rulemaking Committee, which recommended a more streamlined approval process for safety equipment on small general aviation aircraft.

The new rule also promotes regulatory harmonization among the FAA’s foreign partners, including the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA), and Brazil’s Civil Aviation Authority (ANAC).  This harmonization may help minimize costs for airplane and engine manufacturers and operators of affected equipment who seek certification to sell products globally.

The rule affects airplane manufacturers, engine manufacturers, and operators of affected equipment.  Click here to learn more from the FAA and industry about the benefits of streamlined certification.

This regulatory change is a leading example of how the FAA is transforming its Aircraft Certification Service into an agile organization that can support aviation industry innovation in the coming years.  The Service is focused on using risk-based oversight to refresh the certification strategy, investing in management systems to improve performance, and improving the overall organization.

The rule will be effective eight months from publication in the Federal Register.

Source: FAA

Airbus A321neo With P&W Engines Receives Type Certification

EASA and FAA certification paves way for the first delivery 

Toulouse, December 15, 2016: Following a comprehensive flight test program, the A321neo powered by Pratt & Whitney’s PurePower PW1100G-JM engines received joint Type Certification from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on 15th December 2016.
The documents were respectively signed by EASA’s Certification Director Trevor Woods and by Jeffrey Duven, FAA Manager of the Transport Airplane Directorate – Aircraft Certification Service. Both certificates were handed over to Airbus Executive Vice President Programs, Didier Evrard, and Airbus Senior Vice President A320 Family Program, Klaus Roewe.
“The A321neo allows airlines to upsize their fleets while offering a winning combination of unbeatable economics and comfort. The A321 contributes already some 40 per cent to our single aisle deliveries, and further growing,” said Fabrice Brégier, Airbus President and CEO.
“Today’s certification is a rewarding tribute to all the teams who have been instrumental in making this essential milestone happen.”

A321neo

The A321neo – the largest member of the A320neo Family – successfully completed a certification program accumulating over 350 flight hours in more than 130 flights; validating its airframe and systems well beyond their design limits to ensure the aircraft successfully meets all airworthiness criteria. The campaign also confirmed the aircraft is meeting its performance targets in terms of fuel burn and range. Offering significant environmental benefits, including a smaller noise footprint, the aircraft also demonstrated excellent low speed performance capabilities for its operators.

A321neo Flooded Test

The Pratt & Whitney powered aircraft is the first variant of the A321neo to have received EASA and FAA Type Certification. The A321neo with CFM International LEAP-1A engines will be certified in the coming months.
The A320neo Family is the world’s best-selling single aisle product line with over 4,800 orders from 89 customers, capturing 60 percent share of the market. 
Source: Airbus

Bombardier CS300 Jetliner Awarded FAA Type Validation 

Montréal, December 14, 2016: Bombardier Commercial Aircraft announced today that its CS300 airliner has been awarded its Type Validation by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This most recent approval means that both the CS300 aircraft and the smaller CS100 aircraft are now approved by Transport Canada, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the FAA.

The FAA recently conducted an operational evaluation on the CS100 and CS300 aircraft and determined that both aircraft will share the same pilot type rating — allowing operators to benefit from significant cost-saving opportunities.

“These airworthiness validations by international authorities recognize the exhaustive process and work done by Bombardier, in conjunction with Transport Canada, who awarded the C Series aircraft their original aircraft type approvals,” said François Caza, Vice President, Product Development and Chief Engineer and Head of Bombardier’s Design Approval Organization. “C Series aircraft combine new materials, new manufacturing processes and new design philosophies, which are fully recognized through the completion of these validations by major international authorities.”

“The SWISS CS100 airliners have had very strong in-service performance to date and are now in their fifth month of operation; and earlier today, the CS300 aircraft entered revenue service with airBaltic’s first passenger flight from Riga to Amsterdam.” said Rob Dewar, Vice President, C Series Program, Bombardier Commercial Aircraft.

The C Series is presently the only aircraft optimized for the 100- to 150-seat market segment, which drives the aircraft’s phenomenal economic proposition and performance, opening up new opportunities for single-aisle aircraft operation. The C Series aircraft is manufactured by the C Series Aircraft Limited Partnership, an affiliate of the Bombardier Commercial Aircraft segment of Bombardier Inc.

CS300

Source: Bombardier

New Rotorcraft Safety Project

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

HAI, FAA and Purdue University to cooperate


Alexandra, Virginia, USA: The Helicopter Association International (HAI) is working on a rotorcraft safety project with the FAA and a number of academic institutions, including Purdue University (West Lafayette, Indiana, USA). The purpose of the research is to gather intelligence directly from those in the helicopter industry to assist with prioritizing accident and incident mitigation strategies.

To accomplish this, the research team has created a survey on rotorcraft operations.  The survey should take approximately 10 – 12 minutes to complete. Participants are free to not answer any questions or to stop participation at any time. The survey is anonymous; no personally identifiable information will be collected. The answers and any resulting analysis will not be traceable.

Responses are greatly appreciated and will be useful in making flying helicopters safer. Participants may access the survey here:
https://purdue.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6ycRsnEt0Y9AWBD

If the link doesn’t work, please copy the link text directly into your web browser.

If you have any questions regarding the survey or the information contained within, please feel free to contact the researchers directly. This part of the research is conducted by Professor Karen Marais (kmarais@purdue.edu) and Divya Bhargava (dbhargav@purdue.edu) from the Purdue School of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Source: Edward F. DiCampli, HAI Chief Operating Officer & Corporate Secretary

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