Airbus A330neo en route to Reliability Tests

sustainable aviation

Reducing fuel consumption by about 25 % per seat

Toulouse, June 182018: The A330neo, Airbus’ newest widebody aircraft, has embarked on a worldwide tour to demonstrate its readiness for airline operations. As final step in the aircraft certification phase these function & reliability tests, also known as route proving will include ETOPS missions, landing at diversion airports and testing airport handling services. After a fly past over Airbus’ European sites, the A330neo will head for 15 major airports worldwide over five continents, aiming at achieving 150 Flight Test Hours in three trips. The route proving tests are performed with the first A330-900 production aircraft, fully equipped with an ‘Airspace by Airbus’ cabin and flying in launch operator’s Tap Air Portugal colors.
The route proving tests form part of the last trials required for aircraft Type Certification scheduled for summer 2018. Today two A330-900 flight test aircraft and the TAP customer aircraft are involved in the intensive flight test program, which will reach 1000 flight hours during the tour of the Airbus plants. 
Launched in July 2014, the A330neo family is the new generation A330, comprising two versions: the A330-800 and A330-900 sharing 99% commonality. It builds on the proven economics, versatility and reliability of the A330 family, while reducing fuel consumption by about 25 percent per seat versus previous generation aircraft and increasing range by up to 1,500nm compared to the majority of A330s in operation. The A330neo is powered by Rolls-Royce’s latest-generation Trent 7000 engines and features a new wing with increased span and new A350 XWB inspired Sharklets.
sustainable aviation

Airbus A330neo taking-off for a worldwide tour to demonstrate its readiness for airline operations

Source: Airbus

Airbus Delivers its 100th A350 XWB

A350 XWB

25 % reduction in fuel burn and emissions

Toulouse, July 26, 2017: Airbus has delivered its 100th A350 XWB, just some 30 months after the first delivery of the world’s most modern widebody aircraft in December 2014. The 100th aircraft delivered is an A350-900 for China Airlines.

“The 100th A350 XWB milestone comes as we reach our fastest widebody production ramp-up, on track to meet the target of 10 A350 deliveries per month by the end of 2018,” said Fabrice Bregier, Airbus COO and President Commercial Aircraft. “We are especially proud to deliver today’s aircraft to our long-standing customer China Airlines. The A350 is setting new standards for long haul air travel in terms of efficiency and comfort, thus being the perfect aircraft for China Airlines to expand its long-haul network.”

“China Airlines is happy to be receiving the 100th A350 XWB,” said Nuan-shuan Ho, Chairman of China Airlines. “This remarkable new aircraft has not only met, but exceeded our expectations at every level. This includes operational efficiency, the step-change reduction in fuel consumption and the in-flight comfort standards it offers our passengers. Worldwide demand for air travel will continue to grow strongly, especially on long haul routes linking Asia with Europe and North America. The A350 XWB is one of the key assets in our fleet and will be the basis for the development of our long haul route network.”

To date the A350 has been delivered to 14 airlines worldwide and is flying with an outstanding operational reliability rate of 99%*. “This is a remarkable statistic at this early stage of the program,” Fabrice Bregier adds.

The A350 XWB features the latest aerodynamic design, carbon fiber fuselage and wings, plus new fuel-efficient Rolls-Royce engines. Together, these latest technologies translate into unrivalled levels of operational efficiency, with a 25 per cent reduction in fuel burn and emissions, and significantly lower maintenance costs.

A350 XWB

EVE-1548

Source: Airbus

 

Mitsubishi Regional Jet

IASA

Mitsubishi Regional Jet Delayed to Mid-2020

Tokyo, January 23, 2017: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) announced today that MHI and Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation will adjust the first delivery of the Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) from mid-2018 to mid-2020. The change is due to revisions of certain systems and electrical configurations on the aircraft to meet the latest requirements for certification.

The design change will not affect aircraft structure and these design changes will not affect aircraft performance, fuel consumption, or functionality of systems. The company has already completed static structure test with ultimate load(150% load) successfully.

MHI recently established the MRJ Business Promotion Committee, chaired by Shunichi Miyanaga, President & Chief Executive Officer of MHI, to oversee the continued development and long-term business performance of the MRJ, effective on November 28, 2016.

Since the historic MRJ first flight in November 2015, Mitsubishi Aircraft announced significant progress in both engineering and test, and now four MRJ90 test aircraft are flying, three of them in the United States.

IASA

Second MRJ test aircraft taking-off for the first flight
Photo: Mitsubishi Aircraft

Source: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. / Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation

Boeing: SpiceJet Announce Deal for up to 205 Airplanes

A Boeing 737 MAX 8 has marked a key

New aircraft with 20 percent lower fuel use than first 737NG

New Delhi, January 13, 2017: Boeing and SpiceJet announced today a commitment for up to 205 airplanes during an event in New Delhi.

Booked at the end of 2016, the announcement includes 100 new 737 MAX8s, SpiceJet’s current order for 42 MAXs, 13 additional 737 MAXs which were previously attributed to an unidentified customer on Boeing’s Orders & Deliveries website, as well as purchase rights for 50 additional airplanes.

“With the next generation of 737 and the 737 MAX we are sure that we can be competitive and grow profitably,” said Ajay Singh, Chairman and Managing Director, SpiceJet. The airline, an all-Boeing jet operator, currently operates 32 737 NGs (Next-Generation) in its fleet.

“We are honored to build upon more than a decade of partnership with SpiceJet with their commitment of up to 205 airplanes,” said Ray Conner, Vice Chairman, The Boeing Company. “The economics of the 737 MAXs will allow SpiceJet to profitably open new markets, expand connectively within India and beyond, and offer their customers a superior passenger experience.”

The 737 MAX incorporates the latest technology CFM International LEAP-1B engines, Advanced Technology winglets and other improvements to deliver the highest efficiency, reliability and passenger comfort in the single-aisle market.

The new airplane will deliver 20 percent lower fuel consumption than the first Next-Generation 737s and the lowest operating costs in its class.

A Boeing 737 MAX 8 has marked a key

A Boeing 737 MAX 8 has marked a key achievement after completing high altitude flight testing in La Paz, Bolivia. Photo by John Corrigan.

Source: Boeing

IAI’s TaxiBot® in Final Stages of Certification for the A320

Formal EASA approval expected at the beginning of 2017

December 13, 2016: Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) is continuing to progress with its TaxiBot, the semirobotic pilot-controlled vehicle for dispatch towing. Certification tests on an Airbus 320neo were completed successfully at Airbus facilities in Toulouse, France, on December 8, 2016.
The TaxiBot reached its maximum speed of 23 knots, performed multiple turns at different speeds and tight turns at low speed. An engine start of one and both engines of the A320neo during TaxiBotting was performed satisfactorily, as were other tests conducted by Airbus test pilots.
According to Robert Lafontan, Airbus Senior Vice President Engineering, following the successful completion of the final certification tests for the A320 with the TaxiBot, the formal EASA approval is expected at the beginning of 2017.

TaxiBot

TaxiBot, a semi-robotic pilot-controlled vehicle, is designed to transport commercial airline aircraft from terminal gates to the runway and back, without using the airplane’s own engines. TaxiBot started dispatch-towing commercial Lufthansa Boeing 737 (Classic) flights departing out of Frankfurt Airport in November 2014.
Since 2008, IAI, together with its industrial risk-sharing partner TLD, has been cooperating with Lufthansa LEOS in the development of the TaxiBot, with support of both OEMs Airbus and Boeing. Lufthansa LEOS has integrated the TaxiBot project into its “E-PORT-AN” initiative, aimed at taking passenger airplane towing and surface-traffic performance beyond the existing limits of environmental sustainability at Frankfurt Airport. 
“The successful certification of the A320 is an important milestone for the TaxiBot program. Adding the certification of the A320 family to the already certified B737 family covers 70 percent of all the worldwide commercial airlines flights, which could be provided with TaxiBot service” said Ran Braier, Director of Civil Robotics at IAI. “Certification will enable operation of this innovative system with major airline fleets in leading airports, revolutionizing the commercial aviation industry, while saving millions of dollars in fuel costs, improving operations and contributing to the global environment.”
Major benefits of the TaxiBot-concept are:
  • Major saving in fuel consumption
  • Significant reduction of greenhouse gases
  • Significant reduction of noise levels
  • FOD reduced by 50%
  • Increased operational efficiency and throughput at airport gates
  • No modification in airplane system
  • No need for APU replacement
  • No added weight to the airplane
TaxiBot
Source: IAI TaxiBot  
 

NASA Runs First-Ever Test of New Jet Engine Tech

Boundary layer ingesting propulsors have the potential to significantly improve aircraft fuel efficiency

NASA Glenn Research Center, December 9, 2016: Car, truck, train and aircraft manufacturers have made great strides in recent years to reduce fuel consumption, resulting in consumer savings and lower emissions. With NASA’s help, the aircraft industry is striving to increase fuel efficiency even more.

One way to do that is to create new aircraft engine designs. Engineers at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland are testing a new fan and inlet design, commonly called a propulsor, which could increase fuel efficiency by four to eight percent more than the advanced engine designs airlines are beginning to use.

On today’s jet aircraft, the engines are typically located away from the aircraft’s body to avoid ingesting the layer of slower flowing air that develops along the aircraft’s surfaces, called boundary layer. Aerospace engineers believe they can reduce fuel burn by embedding an aircraft’s engines into these surfaces and ingesting the boundary layer air flow to propel the aircraft through its mission.

It sounds like a simple design change, but it’s actually quite challenging. Boundary layer air flow is highly distorted, and that distortion affects the way the fan performs and operates. These new designs require a stronger fan.

To address these challenges, NASA Glenn is testing a new propulsor in its 8’ x 6’  Wind Tunnel. Designed by United Technologies Research Center with research conducted by Virginia Polytechnic and State University, the rugged boundary layer ingesting (BLI) inlet-fan combination is the first of its kind ever to be tested.

“Studies backed by more detailed analyses have shown that boundary layer ingesting propulsors have the potential to significantly improve aircraft fuel efficiency,” said David Arend, a BLI propulsion expert at NASA Glenn. “If this new design and its enabling technologies can be made to work, the BLI propulsor will produce the required thrust with less propulsive power input. Additional aircraft drag and weight reduction benefits have also been identified.”

The highly experimental tests required years of preparation. Many industry, NASA and academic experts contributed to the design and analysis of the propulsor. NASA Glenn engineers also modified the wind tunnel to accept a larger model, a boundary layer control system and a way to power the experiment.

boundary layer ingestion

he “double bubble” D8 Series is one aircraft design concept that uses boundary layer ingestion. Credits: NASA/MIT/Aurora Flight Sciences

“We have generated a unique test capability that doesn’t exist anywhere in the country for testing boundary layer ingesting propulsors,” said Jim Heidmann, manager of NASA’s Advanced Air Transport Technologies project.

Throughout testing, the team will change the wind speed and vary the boundary layer thickness and fan operation to see how these changes affect the propulsor’s performance, operability and structure. Results of the tests will be applicable to multiple cutting-edge aircraft designs being pursued by NASA as well as by its academic and private industry partners.

This animation shows an engine fan and inlet ingesting boundary layer air 
in a wind tunnel. Credits: NASA

Source: NASA Glenn Research Center / Jan Wittry / Kelly Heidman

MRJ Completes Ferry Flight to the U.S.

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Type certificate scheduled for 2018

Nagoya, September 29, 2016: Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) announced today the successful ferry flight of a MRJ (Mitsubishi Regional Jet) to the United States. Using the First Test Aircraft (FTA-1) of the new regional jet, Mitsubishi Aircraft will intensify flight tests in the U. S. in order to accelerate the development of the MRJ toward type certificate acquisition in 2018.

The aircraft took off from Nagoya Airfield at 1:28 pm on September 26 (JST), and arrived at Grant County International Airport in the U.S. State of Washington at 9:44am on September 29 (JST) (5:44pm on September 28 in local time).

Test flights of the MRJ in the U. S. will be supported by three engineering bases (Moses Lake Flight Test Center, the MRJ flight test center within Grant County International Airport; Seattle Engineering Center and Mitsubishi Aircraft Headquarters in Japan).

Mitsubishi Regional Jet is a family of 70-90-seat next-generation aircraft featuring the Pratt & Whitney’s revolutionary PurePower® engine and state-of-the-art aerodynamics to drastically reduce fuel consumption, noise, and emissions, while offering top-class operational benefits, an outstanding cabin designed for heightened passenger flying comfort with large overhead bins. The MRJ carried out the first flight on November 11, 2015.

With the recent sale of ten MRJ to U.S.-based Aerolease Aviation, 427 MRJ aircraft are on order (233 firm, 170 option and 24 purchase rights). 20 will be added to its order book when Mitsubishi Aircraft signs a definitive agreement with Rockton. The total of 447 MRJ aircraft includes 243 firm orders with 180 options and 24 purchase rights.

Source: Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation

CFM: First LEAP-1A Production Engines Delivered to Airbus

Double-digit improvements in fuel consumption for A320neo family

Villaroche, France, April 14, 2016: CFM International delivered the first two LEAP-1A production engines for the A320neo. The delivery paves the way for installation on the first customer aircraft and for entry into service by mid-year. The name of the initial LEAP/A320neo delivery customer will be disclosed at a later date.

The engines completed final assembly at the Snecma (Safran)’s facility in Villaroche, France. “It is a very proud day for us,” said Francois Bastin, executive vice president of CFM International. “The engine continues to perform exceptionally well in flight tests and we can’t wait for our airline customers to introduce it into their fleets.”

The LEAP-1A flew for the first time on the Airbus A320neo on May 19, 2015. A second A320neo was added to the test program in September of last year and, in February 2016, the LEAP engine was the first to power the new A321neo. To date, the three aircraft have logged a combined total of more than 285 flights and more than 800 hours of flight testing.

“The next challenge is entry into service,” said Allen Paxson, executive vice president for CFM. “We have been working close with our customers on tooling and training and have been stress-testing our support infrastructure for several months. We expect the LEAP-1A commercial introduction to be one of the smoothest we have ever had.”

The LEAP-1A, which powers the Airbus A319neo, A320neo, and the A321neo aircraft, features some of the industry’s most advanced technology, including 3-D woven carbon fiber composite fan blades and fan case; a unique debris rejection system; 4th generation three dimensional aerodynamic designs; the Twin-Annular, Pre-Swirl (TAPS) combustor featuring additively manufactured fuel nozzles; ceramics matrix composite shrouds in the high-pressure turbine; and titanium aluminide (Ti-Al) blades in the low-pressure turbine.

The engine will provide operators with double-digit improvements in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions compared to today’s best CFM engine, along with dramatic reductions in engine noise and exhaust gaseous emissions. All this technology brings with it CFM’s legendary reliability and low maintenance costs.

CFM has delivered the first LEAP-1A shipset for the A320neo.   Foto: Copyright Philippe Stroppa

CFM has delivered the first LEAP-1A shipset for the A320neo. Foto: Copyright Philippe Stroppa

The LEAP engine is a product of CFM International, a 50/50 joint company between Snecma (Safran) and GE. Overall. CFM has received orders for more than 10,400 LEAP engines across all three models. For more information please visit www.cfmaeroengines.com.

Source: CFMI