Neste’s New Online Hub about Sustainable Aviation

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

decarbonizingaviation.com: Neste’s New Online Hub about Sustainable Aviation

Most passengers would be willing to pay a fee for moresustainable aviation

Keilaranta, December 21, 2017: Aviation is the fastest growing means of transport. In 2016, 3.8 billion people travelled by air, and according to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the number of passengers is predicted to reach 7.2 billion (!) by 2035. With this growth comes the reality that carbon dioxide (CO2)emissions from aviation will grow substantially. Carbon neutral growth in aviation is possible, but requires that airports, solutions providers, airlines, authorities, local community and passengers all unite and contribute to more sustainable travelling.

According to a recent survey, 67% of US passengers, and 53% of European travelers, are concerned about the environmental impacts of air travel. The survey found that over 50% of passengers consider it important that their airline goes above and beyond regulations to be environmentally friendly. Furthermore, the survey found that most passengers are willing to pay a fee for Renewable Jet Fuel, and that this may even positively impact airline and airport preference.

“As aviation currently makes up roughly 2% of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions, making the transition towards carbon neutral growth is an absolute imperative,” says Paul Paoletta, Head of Neste Aviation Solutions.
To raise awareness and facilitate dialog in reducing the aviation industry’s carbon footprint, Neste has opened its decarbonizingaviation.com online hub for all stakeholders in aviation.  The site features videos, blogs, articles and news across hot topics in the decarbonization of aviation debate, from waste materials as sustainable jet fuel for aircraft to changing legislation to passenger perspectives.

“People are travelling more than ever, and the aviation industry is growing. It is crucial that this growth happens responsibly. Neste is working relentlessly to help airports and all aviation stakeholders to take advantage of sustainable low-carbon fuels in their operations. Besides sustainable low-carbon fuels, we are opening other opportunities for more sustainable aviation solutions through our Neste Green Hub solution. Decarbonizingaviation.com is an online platform for all aviation stakeholders who are working for the goal of carbon neutral growth in aviation,” continues Paoletta.

Neste is the world’s largest producer of renewable fuels from waste and residues alongside being the leading producer of renewable diesel, with an annual production volume of 2.6 million tons. By eliminating bottlenecks, this total capacity will be increased to 3 million tons by 2020. Renewable jet fuel is one of Neste’s growth areas. Neste has set a target that the proportion of the company’s renewable products sales outside the road traffic fuels increases to 20% by 2020.

Visit the Decarbonizing Aviation web page to learn more: http://decarbonizingaviation.com

Source: Neste Corporation

Qantas Aircraft to be Powered by Renewable Biofuel from 2020

sustainable aviation

Airline will purchase 30 million liters of renewable jet fuel each year

 
Sydney, October 13, 2017: Qantas has today announced its Los Angeles based aircraft will be powered by biofuel from 2020, reducing the airline’s carbon emissions on its services operating between the US and Australia.
Over the next ten years, the airline will purchase eight million gallons (30 million litres) of renewable jet fuel each year from US based bio-energy company, SG Preston. The fuel will be used by Qantas’ aircraft operating from Los Angeles Airport (LAX) to Australia and follows the Qantas Group’s successful domestic biofuel trial flights in 2012.
The fuel consists of 50 percent renewable jet fuel produced from non-food plant oils, blended with 50 percent traditional jet fuel.  Compared to standard jet fuel, the biofuel emits half the amount of carbon emissions per gallon over its life cycle.
CEO of Qantas International and Freight, Gareth Evans said the commercial biofuel agreement is the first of its kind in Australian aviation history: “The partnership with SG Preston is part of our commitment to lowering carbon emissions across our operations and sees us becoming the first Australian airline to use renewable jet fuel on an ongoing basis. As an airline group we are constantly looking for ways to become more fuel efficient and embrace new technologies and this partnership is a significant step on that journey. Our agreement with SG Preston allows us to secure a supply for our Los Angeles based aircraft where we have a large fuel demand and where the biofuel industry is more advanced.Through our biofuel program we are also exploring renewable jet fuel opportunities in Australia and continue to work with suppliers to develop locally produced biofuels for aviation use.”
Director of Environment for IATA, Michael Gill applauded Qantas and SG Preston on the new deal:“IATA congratulates Qantas and SG Preston on this landmark agreement, being the first commercial biofuel offtake for an Australian airline. Deals such as these are critical to the development of an aviation biofuel sector globally and the achievement of the aviation industry’s climate goals.”
Renewable jet fuel is chemically equivalent to, and meets the same technical, performance and safety standards as conventional jet fuel. SG Preston’s biofuel is produced from renewable plant oils, which do not compete with food production and which meet Qantas’ stringent sustainability certification requirements.
sustainable aviation

Boeing 787-9 showing the colors of Qantas
Photo: Qantas

In 2012 Qantas and Jetstar operated Australia’s first biofuel trial flights. Qantas’ A330 Sydney-Adelaide return service and Jetstar’s A320 Melbourne-Hobart return service were both powered with biofuel derived from used cooking oil (split with 50:50 convential jet fuel) certified for use in commercial aviation
Source: Qantas

Neste: Business Environment Outlook Published

Climate Change Sustainable Aviation

‘Taking Action on Climate Change’ examines changes in energy and transport markets

 
Keilaranta, October 5, 2017: Neste has published a business environment outlook called Taking Action on Climate Change. It discusses key changes taking place in the energy, transport and chemicals markets. As global commitment to tackle climate change requires major efforts to reduce emissions, the use of fossil raw materials will inevitably need to decline in all of these sectors. Neste has risen to become the global leader in renewable diesel, and realizes that there is significant potential for renewable solutions not only in the road transport sector but also in aviation and the plastics industries.
 
Electric vehicles are on the way – what is Neste’s response?
Neste estimates that by 2030, approximately ten percent of the global car fleet will be electric cars. Despite the fact that electric vehicles are expected to rapidly become more common for passenger transport, Neste believes that renewable diesel will remain a competitive solution for reducing transport emissions. By 2021, renewable diesel demand is expected to have doubled in North America, the Nordic countries and Europe.
“The increase of electric cars is a good thing, because we need every possible solution to combat climate change,” says Neste’s President & CEO, Matti Lievonen. “Renewable diesel is also needed, since for the time being it’s one of the most cost-efficient ways to reduce climate emissions, and can do so by as much as 90 percent. Many cities and businesses in Finland, Sweden and also in California have opted for 100 percent Neste MY Renewable Diesel for this reason.”
To achieve Finland’s planned 50 percent emission reduction target by 2030, both biofuels and electric vehicles using emission-free power will be needed in abundance.
 
What is the future of diesel vehicles and diesel fuel?
Some major cities have announced bans or restrictions on diesel vehicles to tackle air quality problems. Due to emissions cheating, the reputation of diesel cars has suffered greatly. Neste believes that the problem of emissions from diesel vehicles can be solved, and that diesel technology will remain competitive for a long time to come.
“Engine standards are evolving, and the automotive industry is committed to important measures to achieve significantly lower tailpipe emissions. One of the ways to further reduce the heavy traffic emissions is to choose 100% biofuels, such as Neste MY Renewable Diesel,” says Lievonen.
In Europe, demand for diesel and other fuels that are classified as middle distillates is expected to grow by more than 10 million tons by 2025. One part of this growth is being driven by the increase in demand for heavy transportation and air traffic. About 70 percent of diesel use is accounted for by heavy transportation.
In the coming years, demand for middle distillates, like diesel, will also increase significantly in shipping, where the IMO’s (International Maritime Organization) global sulfur regulation, which comes into force in 2020, will limit the sulfur content in marine fuels to below 0.5 percent. This means that much of the shipping industry will switch from heavy fuel oil to low-sulfur marine fuels. Neste offers ship owners low-sulfur marine fuels that meet the new emission limits.
 
Renewable solutions for air traffic are on the way
The aviation industry, which consumes rapidly growing volumes of fuel, is also opening up to renewable jet fuels. Legislation to support this change is being developed in several regions, including the EU, Norway, and California. 
“Renewable fuels are seen as an important solution for reducing emissions from air transport. Solutions are needed because at the same time as the aviation industry is committed to reducing its carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, demand for aviation fuel is projected to grow globally by 100 million tons over the next ten years,” says Lievonen.
Neste is a global pioneer in renewable air transport solutions, as the Neste Green Hub solution that the company has developed promotes the use of renewable aviation fuel with the aid of airport cooperation. The first example of this is the recently announced cooperation with Geneva Airport, and discussions are also ongoing on ten other cooperation projects.
 
First commercial delivery of bioplastics in 2018
Neste is also developing new business operations from bioplastics, the raw materials for which are the renewable products manufactured by Neste. The bioplastics market is expected to grow by more than 40 percent by 2021. About 80 percent of this growth is expected to come from durable biobased plastics, such as Neste’s bioplastics solution, the demand for which is growing faster than for biodegradable plastics. Neste’s bioplastic solution is easy to use, because the properties of the plastics produced are exactly the same in production, use and recycling.
“Our renewable products have already been used in bioplastics production, and our goal is to make the first commercial delivery in the first half of 2018. We are working closely with our customers and plastic manufacturers, and discussions are underway with ten global brands,” says Lievonen.
By 2020, Neste targets to have 20% of its renewable business sales volume from renewable jet fuel, renewable chemicals and bio-based plastics.
Climate Change Sustainable Aviation
 
Source: Neste Corporation

British Airways Turning Household Rubbish into Jet Fuel

sustainable aviation

Sustainable fuels will play an increasingly critical role in global aviation

Heathrow, September 18, 2017: British Airways has entered a partnership to design a series of waste plants that convert household waste into renewable jet fuel to power its fleet.

The partnership, with Velocys, a renewable fuels company, is part of the airline’s plans to develop long-term, sustainable fuel options.

The first plant will take hundreds of thousands of tons of household waste per-year, destined for landfill or incineration, including nappies, plastic food containers and chocolate bar wrappers, and convert it into clean-burning, sustainable fuels. This will contribute to the airline’s commitment to reduce net emissions by 50 per cent by 2050.

As well as helping the airline industry reduce its carbon emissions this initiative will also significantly reduce the amount of waste going to landfill. The UK still sends more than 15 million tons of waste per year to landfill sites which not only damages our natural environment but also releases further greenhouse gases (GHG) affecting climate change.

The planned plant will produce enough fuel to power all British Airways’ 787 Dreamliner operated flights from London to San Jose, California and New Orleans, Louisiana for a whole year. It would be the first plant of this scale. The airline plans to supply its aircraft fleet with increasing amounts of sustainable jet fuel in the next decade.

The jet fuel produced at the plant will deliver more than 60 per cent greenhouse gas reduction, compared with conventional fossil fuel, delivering 60,000 tons of CO2 savings every year. This will contribute to both global carbon emissions reductions and local air quality improvements around major airports.

During the past week the Department for Transport has published changes to the Renewable Transport Fuels Obligation (RTFO), and for the first time, sustainable jet fuel will be included in its incentive scheme. These changes to the RTFO are designed to promote sustainable aviation. Once implemented, they are expected to provide long term policy support for this market.

Willie Walsh, IAG chief executive, said: “Sustainable fuels will play an increasingly critical role in global aviation, and we are preparing for that future. Turning household waste into jet fuel is an amazing innovation that produces clean fuel while reducing landfill.”

sustainable aviation

Source: British Airways