SEA-TAC Moves Closer to Funding Aviation Biofuels

Making biofuel available, cost-effective and practical for all airlines at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

Seattle, July 19, 2017: Carbon reduction leaders Carbon War Room (CWR) and SkyNRG join with the Port of Seattle to announce recommendations for long-term funding mechanisms that could supply all airlines at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (Sea-Tac) with sustainable aviation biofuels.

The results are outlined in a study that reviews a broad spectrum of airport funding sources to cover the higher cost of biofuel, as well as biofuel supply chain infrastructure investments. The study, published today, was conducted by CWR and SkyNRG, in partnership with the Port.

“The information contained in this study will help us take the next steps toward our goal of making biofuel available, cost-effective and practical for all airlines at Sea-Tac,” said Port of Seattle Commissioner John Creighton. “It wouldn’t have been possible to get to this point without the momentum provided by our partners, industry leaders and community innovators.”

The two biggest challenges facing broader adoption of sustainable aviation fuel at Sea-Tac are the higher cost compared with petroleum jet fuel, and the constraints imposed by state and federal regulations on use of airport funds.
The report, titled ‘Innovative Funding for Sustainable Aviation Fuel at U.S. Airports: Explored at Seattle-Tacoma International’, reveals the financial tools available to U.S. airports, and outlines legal constraints and financial impacts of each tool. The report found that no single tool could generate enough funding to cover the higher cost of biofuel, and recommended combining a number of funding tools.

“Until we reach fossil-price parity, we need co-funding mechanism to close the price gap between conventional jet fuel and sustainable aviation biofuels. Sea-Tac demonstrates that airports can play a key role in helping find the right partners to cover the premium and accelerate the transition to secure a sustainable future for the aviation industry,” said Theye Veen, Chief Financial Officer of SkyNRG.

“We congratulate Sea-Tac on its leadership in showing that airport authorities are critical to the success of the aviation biofuel industry,” said Adam Klauber, Director of CWR’s Sustainable Aviation program. “We’ve proven that there are viable funding mechanisms for the widespread uptake of sustainable aviation fuel at Sea-Tac, and we hope that the study provides tools and ideas for other ambitious airports to consider in their sustainability initiatives.”

AltAir Fuels, based in California, is regularly producing aviation biofuels.  The Port, as an economic development engine, is seeking ways to help grow the market.  This initiative is one solution in the Port’s quest to find sustainable solutions that improve the health of our environment and community.  Other Port successes include emissions reduction achieved by providing pre-heated and cooled air to aircraft parked at gates, use of electric ground support equipment, and conversion to green vehicles.

For further information, please download the report here.

About Seattle-Tacoma International Airport: Operated by the Port of Seattle, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA, KSEA) is ranked as the ninth busiest U.S. airport, serving nearly 45.7 million passengers and more than 366,000 metric tons of air cargo in 2016. With a regional economic impact of more than $16.3 billion in business revenue, Sea-Tac generates 171,796 jobs (109,924 direct jobs) representing over $2.8 billion in direct earnings and more than $565 million in state and local taxes. Twenty-four airlines serve 81 non-stop domestic and 24 international destinations.

About Carbon War Room: Carbon War Room (CWR) was founded in 2009 as a global nonprofit organization by Sir Richard Branson and a group of like-minded entrepreneurs. It intervenes in markets to accelerate the adoption of business solutions that reduce carbon emissions at gigaton scale. In 2014, CWR merged with and now operates as part of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI). RMI engages businesses, communities, institutions, and entrepreneurs to transform global energy use to create a clean, prosperous, and secure low-carbon future. RMI has offices in Basalt and Boulder, Colorado; New York City; Washington, D.C.; and Beijing.

About SkyNRG: SkyNRG is the global market leader for sustainable aviation fuel (SAF), having supplied over 25 airlines on all continents worldwide. SkyNRG sources, blends and distributes SAF, guarantees sustainability throughout the supply chain and helps to co-fund the premium. At the same time, SkyNRG focuses on developing regional supply chains that offer a real sustainable and affordable alternative to fossil fuels. SkyNRG has its operations RSB certified and is structurally advised by an independent Sustainability Board in which WWF International, European Climate Foundation, University of Groningen and Solidaridad Network hold a seat.

SEA-TAC

Airbus A330 of Thomas Cook Airlines taking-off at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport on the way to Manchester. Photo: Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

Source: Port of Seattle

SkyNRG, Fly Green Fund and Swedavia Enable Sustainable Aviation Fuel Flights from Stockholm

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Growing the sustainable aviation market in the Nordics

Stockholm, Arlanda Airport, January 3, 2017:  Just before New Year’s Eve, Swedavia received its first sustainable aviation fuel at Stockholm Arlanda Airport. It marks the start of deliveries of sustainable aviation fuel through the Fly Green Fund and demonstrates Swedavia’s commitment to sustainable aviation. The fuel is supplied by SkyNRG together with AirBP.

Fly Green Fund

Fly Green Fund is the first of its kind in the world and enables organizations and individuals in the Nordics to reduce their carbon footprint, by flying on sustainable aviation fuel. Swedavia joined Fly Green Fund as launching partner two years ago and also became a corporate customer of Fly Green Fund. Swedavia is the first corporate in the world buying sustainable aviation fuel for all their business flights through Fly Green Fund. “We at Swedavia want to lead the way and help increase the demand for aviation biofuel,” says Lena Wennberg, Director Environment for Swedavia.

Sustainable Aviation Fuel

“It is a milestone in many ways for Fly Green Fund and our partners today. By buying sustainable aviation fuel for their staff flights, Swedavia reduces its own carbon foot print and contributes to developing a sustainable future for aviation.  Other corporate customers like Löfbergs, Resia and our Swish-customers have contributed as well. We are grateful to everyone that has been part of this. It is a real joint effort and shows that together we can grow the sustainable aviation market in the Nordics. We have set an example for others to follow,” says Maria Fiskerud, Managing Director for Fly Green Fund.

SkyNRG organized the sustainable aviation fuel deliveries to Arlanda Airport for Fly Green Fund, in which now also SAS, KLM and EFS are partners.  The sustainable aviation fuel is produced by bio refinery AltAir Fuels in the US and supplied by SkyNRG and AirBP via the common fuel infrastructure running to and at the airport.

“It is great to see that so much is happening in the Nordics. After founding the Fly Green Fund two years ago and after a lot of ground work, this is a huge result thanks to Swedavia. It is a good example that airports are perfectly positioned to support the development of sustainable aviation fuels,” says Theye Veen, CFO for SkyNRG.

For further information please visit: www.skynrg.comwww.flygreenfund.se,www.swedavia.se

Source: SkyNRG

Airports Going Green Conference 2016

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Schiphol to host international conference on sustainable aviation

 Schiphol, July, 2016: The Amsterdam Airport Schiphol will host the upcoming Airports Going Green (AGG) conference for 2016. The AGG is a aviation industry’s leading forum on sustainability. The conference has been held annually in Chicago since 2008, hosted by the Chicago Department of Aviation and the American Association of Airport Executives. This year, the conference will take place in the Netherlands for the first time. It will be hosted by Amsterdam Airport Schiphol at the Hilton Amsterdam Airport, from October 31 to November 2, as part of its centennial celebrations.

The conference theme is sustainable encounters’. It posits that an international network of sustainability experts is important in order to really make a difference in the aviation industry. Conference topics will include emissions, the passenger journey, purpose over profit and the circular economy. Each of these themes will be addressed during our 3-day program. There will be exceptional keynote speeches from airports, airlines and other industries to inspire and engage the audience with their vision, successes and challenges.

Two of the speakers will be Peter Bakker, President of the World Business Council of Sustainable Development and Bertrand Piccard of Solar Impulse. SkyNRG, Tesla and Siemens, as well as large international airports, will address participants and take part in interactive sessions during the conference.

In addition, Airport CEO’s and government officials will meet to discuss joint solutions for the sustainability challenges that lie ahead. Airports that have done their utmost to reach their sustainability targets will be presented with their annual Airports Going Green Award.

Delegates from all continents will be present at AGG 2016 in Amsterdam. This conference offers an ideal platform to facilitate a global transition toward a more sustainable aviation industry. Program and speaker updates will be regularly posted on the conference website at www.airportsgoinggreen.org.

Source: Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

KLM Launches New Series of Biofuel Flights

First Embraer initiative to gauge the efficiency of biofuel in comparison with kerosene on regular flights

Amstelveen, March 31, 2016: KLM Royal Dutch Airlines today launched a series of around 80 biofuel flights from Oslo to Amsterdam operated with an Embraer 190. The remaining flights will be operated over the forthcoming period of five to six weeks, marking yet another step in the right direction towards making aviation more sustainable. Embraer will be conducting measurements during these flights to gauge the efficiency of biofuel in comparison with kerosene.

The flights will depart from Oslo Airport (Avinor), the first airport to supply biofuel directly from its hydrant system since January this year. In addition to biofuel supplied from the hydrant system, biofuel will also be delivered by separate fuel trucks for the series of flights operated by KLM Cityhopper. Biofuel has to be supplied by fuel trucks for these flights in order to measure the efficiency of biofuel in comparison with kerosene during the Embraer flights.

Boet Kreiken, Managing Director KLM Cityhopper: “KLM believes that sustainable biofuel is important for the airline industry. For this reason, we have for some time been cooperating with different partners, including those united within the scope of the ‘KLM Corporate BioFuel Programme’, to stimulate the development of the market. Our new cooperative relationship with Embraer and Oslo Airport (Avinor) serves to underscore just how important this is.”

Jorge Ramos, president Embraer Europe: “Embraer has been directly involved in several initiatives and partnerships for research and development of biofuels for aviation, but these flights with KLM are a flagship, as they represent the first initiative Embraer develops with aviation biofuels on regular flights. We will use the biofuel flights from Oslo to Amsterdam operated by the E190 to gather data to assess the performance of the engines using a percentage of jet biofuel in comparison with fossil-based kerosene.”

Inmaculada Gomez, ITAKA coordinator said: “The biofuel batch for these flights was initiated by ITAKA (Initiative Towards SustAinable Kerosene for Aviation) and funded by the European Commission. With KLMs flights with biofuel from Amsterdam to Aruba and Bonaire (May 2014), KLM is our launching customer. We are happy to go on with our partnership in the Oslo-Amsterdam series of flights which will bring the commercialization of alternative energy sources for air travel one step closer”

The biofuel for this series of flights is produced from 100% RSB (Roundtable on Sustainable Biomaterials) certified camelina oil and in full compliance with the EU RED standard. The biofuel is produced within the ITAKA project and supplied by Air BP and SkyNRG. The ITAKA consortium was founded by leading companies operating in the airline and fuel industries. Together, they are working on producing and testing sustainable biofuel in the airline industry. In achieving this goal, they receive financial support from the European Commission.

The biofuel flights are partly funded by the partners in the KLM Corporate BioFuel Programme: ABN AMRO, Accenture, CBRE Global Investors, FMO, FrieslandCampina, City of Amsterdam, Heineken, Loyens & Loeff, PGGM, Perfetti Van Melle and the Schiphol Group.

KLM’s aim is to reduce CO2 emissions by 20% per passenger in 2020 (compared to 2011 levels) through fleet renewal, using sustainable biofuel and increasing flight efficiency. Because affordable sustainable biofuel is not always available, KLM also aims to stimulate the market for sustainable biofuel. KLM is “best in class” when it comes to fuel efficiency and leads the field with respect to using sustainable biofuel.

KLM’s recent inclusion of the E175 from Embraer in its fleet ties in with the airline’s aim to further reduce CO2 emissions. This aircraft type is significantly more fuel-efficient in comparison with the current Fokker 70 equipment, and is therefore more environmentally friendly. Using 18% less fuel, it also generates an 18% reduction in CO2 emissions.

 

KLM

KLM’s aim is to reduce CO2 emissions by 20% per passenger in 2020 (compared to 2011 levels) through fleet renewal, using sustainable biofuel and increasing flight efficiency

KLM’s recent inclusion of the E175 from Embraer in its fleet ties in with the airline’s aim to further reduce CO2 emissions. This aircraft type is significantly more fuel-efficient in comparison with the current Fokker 70 equipment, and is therefore more environmentally friendly. Using 18% less fuel, it also generates an 18% reduction in CO2 emissions.

Source: KLM

Oslo: Biojet direct from the Airport’s Main Fuel Farm

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

ITAKA provides sustainable fuel for first biojet supply via hydrant system

Oslo, January 22, 2016: ITAKA project contributes to the first commercial supply of sustainable biojet fuel in collaboration with Air BP and Avinor, the Norwegian airport operator, at Oslo Airport Gardermoen (Norway). ITAKA, funded by the European Union’s Seventh Framework Program, is the first project worldwide that demonstrates the entire value chain in Europe from sustainable feedstock production to the use of the biojet fuel using the normal supply mechanism.

The fuel will be first used by Lufthansa Group, followed by Scandinavian national carrier SAS and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, strongly committed to the use of sustainable and low carbon renewable fuels. The sustainable biojet fuel has been produced from camelina grown in Spain by Camelina Company España (CCE) via the NEXBTL technology at Neste’s Porvoo refinery in Finland, and delivered to the airport by SkyNRG. The biojet fuel produced within ITAKA will be supplied directly into Oslo’s fuel hydrant system, meaning that it will become part of the airport’s common storage and distribution system without having to rely on a segregated infrastructure. This is a relevant breakthrough in the emerging market of biofuels for aviation and it is expected to foster an extensive adoption of non-segregated biofuel supplies worldwide.

These activities are framed within the EU’s vision for greening the aviation sector, one of which is the promotion of the development of alternative fuels for aviation. ITAKA is an on – going example of the research and innovation projects supported by the Commission that are delivering technological breakthrough developments for the aviation sector. The objective is reducing the CO2 emissions and shortening the time to market for new and cleaner solutions.

Dr. Inmaculada Gómez from SENASA, ITAKA Project coordinator, highlights: “We are very proud to take part in this pioneering initiative, bringing together several airlines and stakeholders united with a common objective: to support the implementation of sustainable fuels for the aviation industry, bringing the economic viability of biojet fuel a step closer to reality”.

David Gilmour, CEO for Air BP comments: “This is the first time aviation biofuel is being delivered through the normal supply mechanism, thus reducing logistics costs significantly. We want to demonstrate that airports can readily access biofuel with relative ease utilizing existing physical infrastructure. We anticipate that this will garner increased interest and demand, as well as contributing to a sustainable biofuel future for the aviation sector.”

“The commercial supply of sustainable jet fuel at Oslo Airport, using the existing infrastructure, demonstrates that the industry is now ready to take the next step in the development of this market, with KLM, Lufthansa and SAS as launching customers. We see that the Nordics, and especially Norway with the airport incentive installed by Avinor, have the basis and momentum to quickly move forward”, says Mr. Maarten van Dijk, CEO SkyNRG.

About ITAKA: The ITAKA project aims at supporting the development of aviation biofuels in an economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable manner, improving the readiness of existing technology and infrastructures. ITAKA is the first project worldwide that demonstrates the entire value chain for biojet production and the first supported by the EU on this topic and scope.

ITAKA partners are: SENASA (coordinator, ES), Airbus Group (FR, UK), Biotehgen (RO), Camelina Company España (ES), CLH (ES), Embraer (BR), EPFL (CH), Manchester Metropolitan University (UK), Neste (FI), RE-CORD (IT), SkyNRG (NL).

The ITAKA project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Program for research technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No 308807.

For further information please visit: www.itaka-project.eu

Source: ITAKA

Sustainable Jet Fuel Made in Canada

Boeing and the Canadian Aviation Industry Launch Sustainable Aviation Biofuel Project

Vancouver, British Columbia, December 2, 2015: Boeing, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and SkyNRG, with support from Canada’s aviation industry and other stakeholders, are collaborating to turn leftover branches, sawdust and other forest-industry waste into sustainable aviation biofuel.

Canada, which has extensive sustainably certified forests, has long used mill and forest residues to make wood pellets that are used to generate electricity. A consortium that includes Boeing, Air Canada, WestJet, Bombardier, research institutions and industry partners will assess whether forest waste could also be harnessed to produce sustainable aviation biofuel using thermochemical processing.

“Sustainable aviation biofuel will play a critical role in reducing aviation’s carbon emissions over the long term,” said Julie Felgar, managing director of Environmental Strategy & Integration, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “Canada is in a terrific position to leverage its sustainable forests to make environmental progress for its aviation industry and other transport sectors.”

A 2015 Boeing-sponsored study by UBC found that aviation biofuel made from forest waste could meet 10 percent – about 46 million gallons, or 175 million liters – of British Columbia’s annual jet fuel demand. These efforts could also supply biofuel to ground and marine vehicles, saving about 1 million tons of CO2 emissions per year on a life cycle basis across the transportation sector, the study found.

“Air Canada believes that developing a reliable supply of sustainable aviation biofuel in Canada will play a role in achieving our emission reduction goals,” said Teresa Ehman, Director, Environmental Affairs, Air Canada. “By utilizing Canada’s strong forestry research expertise and the knowledge of industry collaborators, this project will contribute significantly to understanding the viability of forest residue-sourced biofuel.”

“WestJet has invested billions of dollars in fleet renewal to reduce our fuel consumption and to ensure we are doing our part towards responsible growth and environmental sustainability,” said Geoff Tauvette, Director of Fuel and Environment, WestJet. “WestJet’s social responsibility mandate is to extend our culture of caring beyond our aircraft doors and we are proud to support initiatives such as these that reduce our carbon footprint through the research, development and production of aviation biofuels in Canada.”

This project, announced during the 2015 Canadian Bioeconomy Conference in Vancouver, was recently awarded funding by the Green Aviation Research and Development Network (GARDN) of Canada as part of a portfolio of investments in technologies to reduce aviation’s carbon emissions.

The consortium is led by UBC and NORAM Engineering and Constructors, Ltd., of Vancouver. Project partner SkyNRG, based in the Netherlands, is the global market leader for sustainable jet fuel, having supplied biofuel to more than 20 carriers worldwide.

Using sustainably produced biofuel reduces lifecycle carbon dioxide emissions by 50 to 80 percent compared to conventional petroleum fuel, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

Boeing, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and SkyNRG, with support from Canada’s aviation industry and other stakeholders, are collaborating to turn leftover branches, sawdust and other forest-industry waste into sustainable aviation biofuel. A 2015 study found that aviation biofuel made from forest waste could meet 10 percent of British Columbia’s annual jet fuel demand. Shown here, waste bark and wood chips at a plywood plant near Kamloops, British Columbia. Photo credit: Nexterra Systems Corp.

Boeing, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and SkyNRG, with support from Canada’s aviation industry and other stakeholders, are collaborating to turn leftover branches, sawdust and other forest-industry waste into sustainable aviation biofuel. A 2015 study found that aviation biofuel made from forest waste could meet 10 percent of British Columbia’s annual jet fuel demand. Shown here, waste bark and wood chips at a plywood plant near Kamloops, British Columbia. Photo credit: Nexterra Systems Corp.

As part of Boeing’s commitment to protect the environment and support long-term sustainable growth for commercial aviation, the company has active biofuel projects on six continents, including in the U.S., Australia, Brazil, China, Europe, Middle East, South Africa and Southeast Asia. More information: www.boeing.com/environment

Source: Boeing