Harbour Air and magniX Partner to Build World’s First All-Electric Airline

IASA - Sustainable Aviation

Aviation Leaders Set to Transform Seaplanes into ePlanes — a Zero-emission Aircraft for the Future

REDMOND, WA and VANCOUVER, B.C. – March 26, 2019 – magniX, the company powering the electric aviation revolution, and Harbour Air, North America’s largest seaplane airline, today announced a partnership to transform Harbour Air seaplanes into an all-electric commercial fleet powered by the magni500, a 750 horsepower (HP) all-electric motor.

Operating 12 routes between hubs like Seattle and Vancouver and across the pristine natural wilderness of the Pacific Northwest, Harbour Air welcomes more than 500,000 passengers on 30,000 commercial flights each year. Through this partnership, both companies are furthering the vision to someday connect communities with clean, efficient and affordable electric air travel.

“Harbour Air first demonstrated its commitment to sustainability by becoming the first fully carbon-neutral airline in North America in 2007, through the purchase of carbon offsets,” said Greg McDougall, founder and CEO of Harbour Air Seaplanes. “Through our commitment to making a positive impact on people’s lives, the communities where we operate and the environment, we are once again pushing the boundaries of aviation by becoming the first commercial aircraft to be powered by electric propulsion. We are excited to bring commercial electric aviation to the Pacific Northwest, turning our seaplanes into ePlanes.”

The aviation industry currently contributes 12 percent of all U.S. carbon emissions and 4.9 percent globally, all while providing few low-cost, fuel-efficient options for passenger flights under 1,000 miles. By modifying existing Harbour Air planes with innovative, all-electric magniX propulsion systems, the partnership will create the world’s first completely electric commercial seaplane fleet. A Harbour Air ePlane will have zero reliance on fossil fuels and produce zero emissions – a significant step forward in the innovation and advancement of the airline industry.

“In 2018, 75 percent of worldwide airline flights were 1,000 miles or less in range. With magniX’s new propulsion systems coupled with emerging battery capabilities, we see tremendous potential for electric aviation to transform this heavily trafficked ‘middle mile’ range,” said Roei Ganzarski, CEO of magniX. “We’re excited to partner with Harbour Air, a forward thinking, like-minded company that is dedicated to bringing environmentally conscious, cost effective air-transport solutions to the West Coast of North America. This partnership will set the standard for the future of commercial aviation operators.”

IASA - Sustainable Aviation

The first aircraft to be converted will be the DHC-2 de Havilland Beaver, a six-passenger commercial aircraft used across Harbour Air’s route network. Harbour Air and magniX expect to conduct first flight tests of the all-electric aircraft in late 2019.

This partnership follows significant milestones for both companies, including the successful testing of magniX’s 350 HP all-electric motor and the addition of a Vancouver to Seattle route in Harbour Air’s destination roster.

Source: Harbour Air

IASA participates in ANIMA Project

IASA e.V. - Sustainable Aviation

ANIMA Project invites IASA e.V. expert to join Expert Committee

IASA e.V. Airport Sustainable Development Expert Dr. Axel Laistner has been asked to participate on the “Impact and Balanced Approach Impact Expert Committee” of the ANIMA (Aviation Noise Impact Management through Novel Approaches) research project within the EU Horizon 2020 program.

The expertise of IASA e.V. regarding sustainable solutions and methods in aviation will therefore be part of the balanced approach validation process of ANIMA.

IASA e.V. - Sustainable Aviation

Picture by ANIMA

Hi Fly leads the world with plastic-free trial flight

HiFly

26 December 2018

In a global first for the airline industry, and a defining moment for the sustainability of the planet, wet-lease carrier Hi Fly is poised to make the first-ever jet-age passenger flight with not a single-use plastic item on board.

The ‘plastics-free’ trial, involving four flights by Hi Fly’s wide-body Airbus A340, 9H-SUN, will jet into the history books for the first time on December 26th, when it takes off from Lisbon on its way to Natal in Brazil.

The first flight will be full with holidaymakers looking to Samba-dance their way out of 2018. It will return to Lisbon, this time with Brazilian passengers looking to welcome in the New Year Portuguese style. The revellers will then make the return journey home a week later. Over 700 passengers will take part in the trial.

sustainable aviation

Commenting ahead of the take-off, Hi Fly President Paulo Mirpuri said: “This historic Hi Fly flight, without any single-use plastic items on board, underlines our commitment to making Hi Fly the world’s first ‘plastics-free’ airline within 12 months.

“We take that commitment very seriously.”

Also speaking prior to the flight, he added: “We are obviously excited and delighted that Hi Fly will be the first airline to attempt such a feat.

“Our corporate mission is based around sustainability and we work hand in glove with the Mirpuri Foundation to make sure that our corporate practices match our wider responsibilities to the planet.

“The test flights will prevent around 350 KG of single-use, virtually indestructible plastics from poisoning our environment.

“Over 100,000 flights take off each day around the world and, last year, commercial aircraft carried nearly four billion passengers. This number is expected to double again in less than 20 years. So, the potential to make a difference here is clearly enormous.

The test flights will help us trial the many substitute items we have developed and introduced them, in a real-world environment.

“We know we may encounter some initial teething problems, but we are confident of addressing these over the coming months.

“We know, too, from the feedback we have received from client airlines and passengers, that it’s the right thing for the airline to be doing.”

Pedro Ramos, the Director-General of Tour operator Alto Astral, the company who chartered the flights between Lisbon and Brazil, spoke of his company’s delight at being a participant in this key industry event.

“Everyone at Alto Astral is excited to be involved in this adventure and we believe that future generations will thank those of us who have been prepared to stand up to try to make a difference now.

“Hi Fly has long been the leader in the field of corporate environmental responsibility and sustainability, and they have rightly identified, as a key objective, the early elimination of plastics pollution. It’s been great for us to see how, in practical terms, they have gone about replacing so much in order to kick-start this elimination process.

“All together for a better world, we say.”

The plastics-free test flight is just the latest move by Hi Fly to make its entire fleet ‘plastics free’ by the end of 2019.

Among the scores of single-use plastic items that have been replaced are: cups, spoons, salt and pepper shakers, sick bags, packaging for bedding, dishes, individual butter pots, soft drink bottles and toothbrushes.

And among the many innovations presented to passengers on the flight, by the Hi Fly environmental experts, will be bamboo cutlery, an array of paper packaging, and containers that, once used, can be readily composted.

Source: HiFly

Bringing together international expertise on jet biofuel and electric aircraft

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Press Release   •   Mar 21, 2018 12:18 GMT

electric aircraft
On Thursday Avinor, the Federation of Norwegian Aviation Industries and Zero are organizing the conference “Emission-free aviation in 2040?” “Aviation is of key importance for Norway and the industry must take its share of responsibility to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Sustainable jet biofuel will play an important role and we are facing the electrification of aviation. We want to bring together the communities working on these issues, with an aim of sharing expertise and insights for the road forward,” says CEO of Avinor, Dag Falk-Petersen. Must develop the market for jet biofuel Studies show that 30 per cent of all aviation fuel at Avinor’s airports can become sustainable by 2030. The fuel can be produced from forestry waste and pulpwood from Norwegian forests. At Avinor Oslo airport and Bergen Airport, Flesland, jet biofuel is available, but it is difficult to source enough. In 2016 1.25 million litres of sustainable jet biofuel were uplifted in Norway. This corresponded to 0.1 per cent of all jet fuel sold in Norway that year. In August 2017 the scheme was also extended to include Flesland. However, there was very limited availability of jet biofuel on the market in 2017, resulting in the drop in of only 125,000 litres of jet biofuel during the year in total for the two airports. “Currently very little sustainable jet biofuel is produced globally, and what little there is has a price that is not competitive. To achieve the target of a 30 per cent drop in and corresponding emission reductions, there will therefore be a need for public instruments,” says Torbjørn Lothe, Managing Director of the Federation of Norwegian Aviation Industries (NHO Luftfart). Electric aircraft are on the way There is considerable interest in and a good deal of activity surrounding the development of electric aircraft. A number of stakeholders, including Boeing, Airbus, Siemens, Rolls Royce, and NASA, are working with and can see the commercial potential of electric and hybrid-electric aircraft. In Norway, Avinor is playing an active role in these efforts. Together with the Norwegian Association of Air Sports (NLF), Avinor has established a long-term project for the introduction of electric aircraft in Norwegian aviation. The project is supported by the government, and the project partners are Widerøe, SAS, and the climate foundation ZERO. “Just a short time ago electric aircraft were unimaginable. Now a number of major players are claiming that in only a few years they will be able to provide aircraft with electric solutions for domestic scheduled traffic in Norway. In order to bring up the volume of emission reductions from aviation, we also need to see a quick phasing in of sustainable jet biofuel. This will allow Norway to lead the way and show how we can realign aviation,” says Marius Holm, head of ZERO. Detailed programme and registration here: https://avinor.no/en/corporate/emission-free-aviation-in-2040/ Source: Avinor

UBER Elevate

nachhaltige Luftfahrt - sustainable aviation

Fast-forwarding to the future of on-demand, urban air transportation

Imagine traveling from San Francisco’s Marina to work in downtown San Jose — a drive that would normally occupy the better part of two hours — in only 15 minutes. What if you could save nearly four hours round-trip between São Paulo’s city center and the suburbs in Campinas? Or imagine reducing your 90-plus minute stop-and-go commute from Gurgaon to your office in central New Delhi to a mere six minutes.

Every day, millions of hours are wasted on the road worldwide. Last year, the average San Francisco resident spent 230 hours commuting between work and home—that’s half a million hours of productivity lost every single day. In Los Angeles and Sydney, residents spend seven whole working weeks each year commuting, two of which are wasted unproductively stuck in gridlock. In many global megacities, the problem is more severe: the average commute in Mumbai exceeds a staggering 90 minutes. For all of us, that’s less time with family, less time at work growing our economies, more money spent on fuel — and a marked increase in our stress levels: a study in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine, for example, found that those who commute more than 10 miles were at increased odds of elevated blood pressure.

On-demand aviation has the potential to radically improve urban mobility, giving people back time lost in their daily commutes. Uber is close to the commute pain that citizens in cities around the world feel. We view helping to solve this problem as core to our mission and our commitment to our rider base. Just as skyscrapers allowed cities to use limited land more efficiently, urban air transportation will use three-dimensional airspace to alleviate transportation congestion on the ground. A network of small, electric aircraft that take off and land vertically (called VTOL aircraft for Vertical Take-off and Landing, and pronounced vee-tol), will enable rapid, reliable transportation between suburbs and cities and, ultimately, within cities.

The development of infrastructure to support an urban VTOL network will likely have significant cost advantages over heavy-infrastructure approaches such as roads, rail, bridges and tunnels. It has been proposed that the repurposed tops of parking garages, existing helipads, and even unused land surrounding highway interchanges could form the basis of an extensive, distributed network of “vertiports” (VTOL hubs with multiple takeoff and landing pads, as well as charging infrastructure) or single-aircraft “vertistops” (a single VTOL pad with minimal infrastructure). As costs for traditional infrastructure options continue to increase[1], the lower cost and increased flexibility provided by these new approaches may provide compelling options for cities and states around the world.

Furthermore, VTOLs do not need to follow fixed routes. Trains, buses, and cars all funnel people from A to B along a limited number of dedicated routes, exposing travelers to serious delays in the event of a single interruption. VTOLs, by contrast, can travel toward their destination independently of any specific path, making route-based congestion less prevalent.

Recently, technology advances have made it practical to build this new class of VTOL aircraft. Over a dozen companies, with as many different design approaches, are passionately working to make VTOLs a reality. The closest equivalent technology in use today is the helicopter, but helicopters are too noisy, inefficient, polluting, and expensive for mass-scale use. VTOL aircraft will make use of electric propulsion so they have zero operational emissions[2] and will likely be quiet enough to operate in cities without disturbing the neighbors. At flying altitude, noise from advanced electric vehicles will be barely audible. Even during take-off and landing, the noise will be comparable to existing background noise. These VTOL designs will also be markedly safer than today’s helicopters because VTOLs will not need to be dependent on any single part to stay airborne and will ultimately use autonomy technology to significantly reduce operator error.

We expect that daily long-distance commutes in heavily congested urban and suburban areas and routes under-served by existing infrastructure will be the first use cases for urban VTOLs. This is due to two factors. First, the amount of time and money saved increases with the trip length, so VTOLs will have greatest appeal for those traveling longer distances and durations. Second, even though building a high density of landing site infrastructure in urban cores (e.g. on rooftops and parking structures) will take some time, a small number of vertiports could absorb a large share of demand from long-distance commuters since the “last mile” ground transportation component will be small relative to the much longer commute distance.

We also believe that in the long-term, VTOLs will be an affordable form of daily transportation for the masses, even less expensive than owning a car. Normally, people think of flying as an expensive and infrequent form of travel, but that is largely due to the low production volume manufacturing of today’s aircraft. Even though small aircraft and helicopters are of similar size, weight, and complexity to a car, they cost about 20 times more.

Ultimately, if VTOLs can serve the on-demand urban transit case well — quiet, fast, clean, efficient, and safe — there is a path to high production volume manufacturing (at least thousands of a specific model type built per year) which will enable VTOLs to achieve a dramatically lower per-vehicle cost. The economics of manufacturing VTOLs will become more akin to automobiles than aircraft. Initially, of course, VTOL vehicles are likely to be very expensive, but because the ridesharing model amortizes the vehicle cost efficiently over paid trips, the high cost should not end up being prohibitive to getting started. And once the ridesharing service commences, a positive feedback loop should ensue that ultimately reduces costs and thus prices for all users, i.e. as the total number of users increases, the utilization of the aircraft increases. Logically, this continues with the pooling of trips to achieve higher load factors, and the lower price feeds back to drive more demand. This increases the volume of aircraft required, which in turn drives manufacturing costs down. Except for the manufacturing learning curve improvements (which aren’t relevant to ridesharing being applied to automobiles), this is very much the pattern exhibited during Uber’s growth in ground transportation, fueled by the transition from the higher-cost UberBLACK product to the lower-cost and therefore more utilized uberX and uberPOOL products.

Source: Uber

Flying Air Taxis from Germany Conquer the World

sustainable aviation

25 Million Euros for Volocopter

⋅ Lukasz Gadowski and the Daimler AG are amongst investors
⋅ Increased investment flows into the launch of the Volocopter

Bruchsal / Germany, 1. August 2017 – The objective of making flying possible for everyone has drawn closer:  In July 2017 the aviation start-up Volocopter agreed a finance deal over 25 million Euros with the automobile firm Daimler from Stuttgart, the technology investor Lukasz Gadowski from Berlin and further investors. Using this fresh capital  Volocopter will further expand upon the leading technology in its purely electrically driven VTOLs, (eVTOL), speed up the introduction process of the Volocopter serial model and conquer the market for flying air taxis. The safe, quiet and environmentally friendly aircraft, suitable for transporting two passengers, will revolutionize mobility in metropolises. In order to realize this vision Volocopter also invests in its team and  plans to continuously develop it further.

Flying Air Taxis

Volocopter is up for a soaring start not just because of the successful round of funding: As early as in June the young enterprise already won top place in the international run for the world’s first pilot project involving air taxis in urban spaces. In the fourth quarter of 2017 Volocopter, together with the state transport authority „Roads and Transport Authority“ (RTA) in Dubai, will conduct initial demonstrations of an autonomous air taxi. By 2030 Dubai aims to carry out 25% of its passenger transportation with the help of autonomous means of transport.

“The strong financial commitment of our new investors is a signal as well as proof of the growing confidence in the newly emerging market for electrically driven VTOLs put to use as personal air taxis“  Florian Reuter, managing director of Volocopter, is pleased to point out. “We deliberately sought a mix of investors with strategic and entrepreneurial backgrounds  and were able to implement this perfectly with Daimler und Lukasz Gadowski”.

Automobile companies specifically are intensely interested in the mobility of the future – in autonomous driving or electrical mobility for example. Daimler is therefore a very valuable strategic partner for Volocopter. “We are world leaders in the development of electrical VTOL aircraft” says Reuter, “and for it to stay that way in the future we are very pleased with the participation of the worldwide leader in automobiles”.

The investor Lukasz Gadowski on the other hand, can support the aviation start-up in very different ways: He has already successfully founded and financed numerous enterprises. Gadowski has enormous experience in the fast and global scaling of tech start-ups. This will be of great value to Volocopter in asserting itself on the global market. “I have been interested in flying cars and following their development for a while. When I saw the Volocopter I got it: The “flying car” has no wheels! What is exciting at Volocopter is not just the magnificent vision but also that which has already been tangibly implemented. Huge ambition with both feet on the ground – a unique combination! In the coming years we can expect a revolution in manned aviation. We at Volocopter will significantly contribute to shaping it!”

Together with its partners, Volocopter will be using the new funding to further expand upon technical innovations and its pioneering role within the emerging industry. The plan is to further the development of the Volocopter up to production maturity and commercial licensing through aviation authorities worldwide. Amongst other things, extensive test flight programs are envisaged for this purpose. In order to speed up progress, the employment of additional engineers specialized in the development of flight systems, software and electric propulsion as well as the development of commercial function is envisaged.

To introduce the Volocopter serial model to the market with full impact the company will also apply the investment to developing brand awareness. The prelude to this will be the new website which is launched today. In addition a professional communications team all around marketing and PR will be installed in order to be optimally equipped for planned events and demonstrations of the Volocopter in the coming months. This will create additional interest and customers for the Volocopter – besides RTA in Dubai.

Flying Air Taxis - Sustainable Aviation


About Volocopter

Volocopter GmbH is the global leader in the development of vertically launching, fully electrical multicopters for the transport of people and of heavy lifting cargo drones. The technical platform is extremely flexible and permits piloted, remote controlled and fully autonomous flight. In addition, the unique design offers a huge degree of safety based on the high redundancy of all critical components. The company’s stated objective is to make every human’s dream of flying come true and to help modern cities resolve their increasing mobility issues. As early as 2011 the company earned its entry into the history of aviation through the manned flight of the world’s first purely electrical multicopter. Since then the young enterprise has set new milestones: In 2016 Volocopter was granted provisional licensing for a two seater Volocopter by the German aviation authority and in 2017 the aviation start-up entered into an agreement with RTA Dubai over the global premiere of an autonomously flying air taxi. The first licensed Volocopter should be on the market next year. In the meantime, the founders Stephan Wolf and Alexander Zosel have gathered an excellentteam of experienced managers like CEO Florian Reuter (formerly of Siemens) and CTO Jan-Hendrik Boelens (formerly of Airbus Helicopters). This paved the way for the further expansion of the company.

Website: volocopter.com      |       YouTube: youtube.com/volocopter

Source: Volocopter

New electric buses at Brisbane Airport

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

New electric buses at Brisbane Airport a win/win for travellers and the environment

Brisbane, 05 June 2017

Brisbane Airport (BNE) is continuing its commitment to sustainability and the environment, being the first Australian airport to roll out a fleet of 11 electric buses.

Carbridge, an Australian-headquartered world leader in aviation passenger ground transport, has been awarded the more than $5 million per year contract to exclusively build, operate and maintain all aspects of the Brisbane Airport bus fleet following a competitive tender process.

The five year contract will commence on 1 July 2017 with the new electric bus fleet coming into full operation in February 2018.

Martin Ryan, Head of Parking and Transport Services at Brisbane Airport, said, “The roll out of electric buses for our landside transport needs reinforces BAC’s ongoing commitment to a cleaner, greener environment and improved passenger experience.

“The new fleet will be super quiet and environmentally clean, having reduced noise pollution and zero tail pipe emissions.

“In fact, swapping out our current fleet for electric buses will result in a reduction of 250 tonnes of carbon emissions each year, equivalent to taking 100 cars off the road,” Mr Ryan said.

Passenger comfort and functionality have not been forgotten with tailored interiors designed specifically for travellers, including plenty of luggage racks, plus three full size double doors making boarding and disembarking more efficient.

“Technology and innovation is also interwoven into the vehicles, with GPS next stop announcements, driver monitoring and real time tracking data, meaning issues can be immediately identified and responded to in real time,” Mr Ryan added.

sustainable aviation

Martin Ryan (Brisbane Airport) and Luke Todd (Carbridge)

Luke Todd, Carbridge CEO, said, “Carbridge is proud to partner with Brisbane Airport to deliver world leading bussing technology for the airport and its patrons.

“The Toro electric buses created by Carbridge are powered by BYD battery technology and are built with an aerospace lightweight aluminium bus body.

“The Carbridge Toro is statistically the world’s best electric bus with a driving range of 600 kilometres on a single charge. The buses use kinetic power regeneration technology to produce charge as the buses decelerate. This advanced technology further reduces battery recharging frequency as power generation is created by the buses whilst in motion.

“Carbridge is delighted to build further upon our long-term relationship with Brisbane Airport which commenced in 2008,” Mr Todd said.

Carbridge is one of Australasia’s leading airport service providers delivering a range of airport infrastructure services including transport, luggage trolley management and passenger facilitation services across multiple airports.

The roll out of Electric Buses is for landside transport operations only at this time.

Carbridge will still operate standard buses airside under separate contractual agreements with Qantas Airways and Virgin Australia.

Source: Brisbane Airport

Airbus demonstrates regular customer delivery flights with sustainable jet fuel

sustainable aviation

15 A350 XWB deliveries already dispatched to Cathay Pacific all with jet fuel blend

Toulouse, 1st June 2017 – Showing its strong commitment towards eco-efficiency, Airbus becomes the first aircraft manufacturer to offer its customers the option of delivering new jets using a blend of sustainable jet fuel.

The 15th A350-900 for Cathay Pacific departed Toulouse on June 1st, bound for Hong Kong, with a 10 percent blend of sustainable jet fuel in its tanks. Since the first delivery in May 2016, all of Cathay Pacific’s A350s have been delivered in this configuration.

The biofuel delivery flight concept, originally devised by Cathay Pacific in 2015 is now in full operation and this latest delivery flight confirms that the supply chain set up a year ago by Airbus and Total is functioning correctly, from the fuel production, through an integrated management at its Saint-Martin Toulouse site and to the customer delivery.

“This is a major step for Airbus and a first for the regular delivery of new production aircraft. It enables us to demonstrate that aviation biofuels are today a reality. We now target to expand this initiative to all our delivery sites, close to our customers,” said Frederic Eychenne, Head of New Energies at Airbus.

The first delivery flights from Hamburg, Germany and Mobile, US, using this type of biofuel are planned as of 2018. Since 2016, Airbus has offered this option for its delivery flights from Toulouse.

The aim is to continue reducing the carbon footprint of each flight starting with the aircraft delivery. Eychenne said: “Right from the first day of operation, an airline can clearly demonstrate its aim of reducing carbon dioxide emissions, thus helping to meet the commitments of the international civil aviation community.”

Through its brand new design with the latest cutting-edge technologies, the A350 XWB has a lower fuel burn and therefore lower CO2 emissions than the aeroplane it replaces, so when sustainable jet fuels are included as part of the operation, the net CO2 emissions reduction factor becomes even greater.

sustainable aviation

As part of its environmental strategy, Airbus intends to continue its efforts by collaborating with all stakeholders in the biofuels sector. “Through this partnership with Cathay Pacific and Total, we have demonstrated that it is possible to set up supply chains for fuels with a low carbon footprint,” Eychenne added. “This initiative confirms Airbus’ commitment to environmental efficiency and its support toward international aviation’s emission reduction targets.”

Source: Airbus

Extra 330LE: Electric-Flight Record Heralds New Era of Aviation

Hybrid-electric planes with four or more seats will now be possible 

Lausanne, Switzerland, December 7, 2016: Walter Extra, the famous aerobatics pilot behind the Extra series of aerobatic planes, has set a FAIworld record in the new field of Electric-powered planes. Launching from Schwarze Heide Airport near Dinslaken, Germany, on November 25, 2016, he flew a unique, battery-powered plane and climbed to 3,000m in a time of 4minutes and 22 seconds.

In doing so, he broke the FAI world record for electric-powered planes that weigh between 500kg to 1,000kg.

Remarkably the plane, an Extra 330LE, only made its maiden flight on June 24 last year.

That first flight was called a “technical milestone” by Siemens, the company behind the technology that powers the electric plane.

“This day will change aviation,” Frank Anton, head of eAircraft at Siemens, said at the time. “This is the first time that an electric aircraft in the quarter-megawatt performance class has flown.”

sustainable aviation

Frank Anton, head of eAircraft at Siemens, congratulates Walter Extra after the record-breaking flight Foto: Siemens

Siemens developed a new type of electric motor that weighs only 50kg but delivers a continuous output of 260 kilowatts to power the Extra aerobatic plane. That is five times more than previous comparable systems.

The new system means that hybrid-electric planes with four or more seats will now be possible. Flying the plane on its maiden flight and for the record was Walter Extra. An award-winning aerobatic pilot and chief designer and founder of Extra Flugzeugbau, a manufacturer of aerobatic aircraft, Extra gave his name to one of the most popular aerobatics aircraft in the sport.

“I pour my heart, mind and soul into ensuring that each aircraft carrying my name is the very best that it can be,” he has said.

The development, initial flights and new world record point the way to an electric-powered future for some aircraft. The battery technology behind the Extra 330LE is scalable, and some industry figures expect to see sustainable, electric-powered passenger aircraft carrying up to 100 people on short-haul routes of up to 1,000km by as early as 2030.

In the air and without engine noise the experience is “almost silent”, Mr Walter Extra said.

Siemens said that they had partnered with Extra Flugzeugbau because aerobatics planes are “particularly well suited” to taking components to their limit, “testing them and enhancing their design”.

The world record belongs to the group of Electric records for Powered Aeroplanes with a take-off weight of 500kg to 1,000kg.

sustainable aviation

For the first time ever, a plane in the certification category CS23 flies with Permit-to-Fly purely electric. The plane is powered by a 260 kilowatt Siemens motor that weighs a mere 50 kilogramm – a record-setting power-to-weight ratio.

Source: Extra Flugzeugbau

Fewer Than 18% of People Have Flown: What Happens Next?

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

UTC: New white paper examines trends in green aviation technology

The number of commercial airplanes is expected to double to around 44,000 in the next 20 years. This increase in air travel means an increase in carbon dioxide emissions from airplanes – but does it have to?

UTC Chief Sustainability Officer John Mandyck and Dr. Alan H. Epstein, Vice President, Technology and Environment at Pratt & Whitney, released a white paper titled ‘The Future of Sustainable Aviation: Betting on Jet Propulsion & Lower Net Carbon Fuels’ detailing exciting new trends in green aviation technology that can allow the tremendous growth in air travel to happen more sustainably. This white paper follows the United Nations International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) first-ever carbon dioxide emissions reduction mandate for air travel. 

For further information please visit: http://naturalleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/UTC-7612-FutureSustainableAviationWhitePaper_3.pdf

Source: Pratt & Whitney, UTC

1 2 3