Boeing: Aerospace-Composites for Making Non-Aviation Products

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

New partnership will reduce solid waste by more than one million pounds a year

Seattle, Dec. 5, 2018: Boeing and ELG Carbon Fibre today announced a partnership to recycle excess aerospace-grade composite material, which will be used by other companies to make products such as laptop cases, other electronic accessories, car parts and other automotive equipment.

The recycling agreement – the first of its kind for the aerospace industry – covers excess carbon fiber from 11 Boeing airplane manufacturing sites and will reduce solid waste by more than one million pounds a year.

Carbon-fiber reinforced material is extremely strong and lightweight, making it attractive for a variety of uses, including in building the super-efficient 787 Dreamliner and the all-new 777X airplane.

As the largest user of aerospace-grade composites from its commercial and defense programs, Boeing has been working for several years to create an economically viable carbon fiber reuse industry. The company improved its production methods to minimize excess and developed a model for collecting scrap material.

But technical barriers stood in the way of repurposing material that had already been “cured” or prepped for use in the airplane manufacturing process. UK-based ELG developed a proprietary method to recycle “cured” composites so they do not have to be thrown out.

“Recycling cured carbon fiber was not possible just a few years ago,” said Tia Benson Tolle, Boeing Materials & Fabrication director for Product Strategy & Future Airplane Development. “We are excited to collaborate with ELG and leverage innovative recycling methods to work toward a vision where no composite scrap will be sent to landfills.”

To prove that the recycling method can be applied on a grand scale, Boeing and ELG conducted a pilot project where they recycled excess material from Boeing’s Composite Wing Center in Everett, Wash., where the massive wings for the 777X airplane are made.

ELG put the excess materials through treatment in a furnace, which vaporizes the resin that holds the carbon fiber layers together and leaves behind clean material. Over the course of 18 months, the companies saved 1.5 million pounds of carbon fiber, which was cleaned and sold to companies in the electronics and ground transportation industries.

“Security of supply is extremely important when considering using these materials in long-term automotive and electronic projects,” said Frazer Barnes, managing director of ELG Carbon Fibre. “This agreement gives us the ability to provide that assurance, which gives our customers the confidence to use recycled materials.”

Based on the success of the pilot project, Boeing says the new agreement should save a majority of the excess composite material from its 11 sites, which will support the company’s goal to reduce solid waste going to landfills 20 percent by 2025.

“This collaboration takes Boeing’s commitment to protect the environment to a whole new level. Recycling composites will eventually be as commonplace as recycling aluminum and titanium,” said Kevin Bartelson, 777 Wing Operations leader.

Boeing and ELG are considering expanding the agreement to include excess material from three additional Boeing sites in Canada, China and Malaysia.

As a result of the partnership, ELG estimates the number of its employees will nearly triple from 39 in 2016 to an expected 112 by the end of 2019 as the recycling market continues to expand.

Source: Boeing

Boeing Delivers Its 2,000th Airplane to China

737-MAX

Delivery milestone reflects rapid growth in world’s largest commercial aviation market

 
Seattle, Nov. 30, 2018: Boeing today delivered its 2,000thairplane to a Chinese operator, a 737 MAX for Xiamen Airlines. The milestone and the pace at which it was reached reflect the accelerating growth in the world’s largest commercial aviation market.
Boeing delivered its first 1,000 airplanes to Chinese airlines over four decades. The next 1,000 Boeing jets have now been delivered over the past five years. The rapid pace continues as one in four Boeing-made commercial jet goes to a Chinese operator, either through direct purchase or lease.
The new 737 MAX delivered today sports a special logo commemorating the milestone. It is the eighth MAX airplane to join fast-growing Xiamen Airlines, which operates the largest all-Boeing fleet in China with more than 200 jets. The carrier also uses Boeing Global Services to improve the efficiency of its network and operations. Xiamen is the first Chinese airline to use Optimized Maintenance Program, which leverages Boeing AnalytX to recommend customized airplane maintenance plans.
Xiamen Airlines is one of Boeing’s more than 30 commercial customers in China. In all, Boeing-made jets comprise more than half of the greater than 3,000 jetliners flying in the country.
China’s commercial fleet is expected to more than double over the next 20 years. Boeing forecasts that China will need 7,690 new airplanes, valued at $1.2 trillion, by 2038. Boeing also forecasts China will experience strong growth in the commercial services market with demand growing $1.5 trillion over the next 20 years, accounting for 17 percent of world demand.
737-MAX

737 MAX for Xiamen Airlines: Boeing delivered its 2,000th airplane to a Chinese operator

China also plays a major role in building the world’s jetliners. The Chinese aerospace manufacturing industry supplies parts for every Boeing jet, including the 737 MAX, 777, and 787 Dreamliner. In December, Boeing and the Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China (COMAC) are set to deliver the first 737 MAX airplane from a completion and delivery center in Zhoushan, China. The facility will handle interior work and exterior painting of 737 MAXs for the Chinese market. Final assembly work will continue to be done at Boeing’s factory in Renton, Wash.
Boeing activity in China is valued at more than $1 billion in economy activity in China. This includes procurement from Boeing’s extensive supply base, joint venture revenues, operations, training, and research and development investment.
Source: Boeing

Upcoming report on EU climate action – support for carbon capture and innovative renewables

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation
19/10/2018

On Tuesday 23 October 2018, the European Court of Auditors (ECA) will publish a special report on the effectiveness of EU funding to support commercial deployment of carbon capture and storage and innovative renewables.

ABOUT THE AUDIT
The ECA examined the design, management and coordination of the two dedicated EU funding programs worth almost €4 billion. The auditors assessed whether they made the progress expected in helping carbon capture and innovative renewables advance towards commercial deployment. They carried out audit visits to five Member States: Germany, Spain, the Netherlands, Poland and the United Kingdom.
The report is expected to warn against poor achievements of EU support in terms of projects and results. The auditors are expected to single out the uncertainties in policies and rules as well as a lack of clear accountability and control. They will make a number of recommendations for improving the EU’s approach in view of the Innovation Fund to be launched in 2021.
ABOUT THE TOPIC
The EU climate and energy package for 2020 required an increased use and development of renewable energy sources and low carbon technologies. In 2009, the EU launched the European Energy Programme for Recovery with a budget of €1.6 billion to support carbon capture storage and offshore wind projects. At the same time, the EU created the New Entrants’ Reserve 300 funded by the sale of 300 million emission allowances (€2.1 billion). Both programmes set ambitious targets for carbon capture and storage and innovative renewable energy projects.

The ECA’s special reports set out the results of its audits of EU policies and programmes or management topics related to specific budgetary areas. The ECA selects and designs these audit tasks to be of maximum impact by considering the risks to performance or compliance, the level of income or spending involved, forthcoming developments and political and public interest.

Source: EUROPEAN COURT OF AUDITORS

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