Boeing and COMAC Expand Collaboration on Environmental Efficiency and Sustainable Growth

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Sustainable Aviation Technology Center to pursue mutually beneficial research 

Zhuhai, China, November 1, 2016: Boeing and Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China (COMAC) today signed a new agreement to expand their joint research collaboration in support of the long-term sustainable growth of commercial aviation.

The two companies, which signed an initial collaboration agreement in March 2012, have been researching ways to improve aviation’s fuel efficiency and greenhouse-gas emissions reduction, including sustainable aviation biofuel and air traffic management (ATM) efficiency.

Through this new agreement, signed at the Zhuhai Airshow, the companies will explore six areas of mutually beneficial research through the renamed Boeing-COMAC Sustainable Aviation Technology Center. They will also continue to exchange commercial aviation market forecasts.

“As we approach the 45th year of collaboration between Boeing and China’s aviation industry, Boeing and COMAC are expanding our efforts to ensure commercial aviation’s long-term sustainable growth, improve its efficiency and reduce environmental impact,” said Ian Chang, vice president, Supplier Management China Operations & Business Development, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “Our mutually beneficial research with COMAC supports Boeing’s global effort to enable growth and partner to address challenges for our industry.”

“The two companies have enhanced mutual trust and understanding during five years of working together,” said Wu Guanghui, Vice President of COMAC. “The agreement signed today extends and will bring our cooperation to a new level, enabling the two companies to leverage their own advantages for win-win results that can benefit not only China, but also the rest of world.”

Research areas for the Sustainable Aviation Technology Center will include:

  • Technologies supporting sustainable aviation fuel development and assessing the benefit to aviation of using these technologies;
  • ATM technologies and applications;
  • Environmentally sustainable manufacturing, including enhanced recycling of materials;
  • Technologies to enhance the airplane cabin environment related to environmental stewardship and air travel by aging populations;
  • New industry or international standards in aviation energy conservation and emissions reduction;
  • Improvements in workplace safety during cabin and ground operations.

Initial agreement

As they have since 2012, Boeing and COMAC will jointly select and fund research by China-based universities and research institutions. Their initial agreement created the Boeing-COMAC Aviation Energy Conservation and Emissions Reductions (AECER) Technology Center. Since then, the Boeing-COMAC AECER Center conducted 17 research projects, leading to an aviation biofuel demonstration facility that turns waste “gutter oil” into jet fuel and three ATM software prototype systems. The Center has attracted participation of 12 domestic and international research partners.

In addition, Boeing and COMAC plan to open a joint venture facility in Zhoushan, China, that will install interiors and paint 737s before Boeing delivers these airplanes to Chinese customers.

China is one of the world’s fastest-growing aviation markets. The Civil Aviation Administration of China has forecast that passenger traffic in China will reach 485 million this year and will reach 1.5 billion passengers in 2030. Boeing has estimated that Chinese airlines will need to purchase more than 6,800 new airplanes through 2035 to meet fast-growing demand for domestic and international air travel.
Source: Boeing China Communications

Boeing, ANA Highlight 787-9 Dreamliner

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Capabilities in New Flight Demonstration Video

Everett, Wash., July 7, 2016: Boeing and ANA (All Nippon Airways) today released the 2016 787-9 Dreamliner Flight Demonstration video. The same ANA airplane is scheduled to perform demonstration flights July 11-13 at the Farnborough International Airshow.

Capt. Randy Neville, Capt. Van Chaney and Capt. John Misuradze, Boeing test pilots, conducted the flight in Moses Lake, Wash. The video offers a preview of the planned air show technical demonstration, as well as additional maneuvers to showcase the airplane’s performance and capabilities. These include:

  • High-banking turns that show wing flex
  • Side-to-side movements to demonstrate roll authority and handling characteristics

ANA made history by becoming the launch customer of the 787 Dreamliner and makes history again by becoming the first Japanese airline to take part in a demonstration flight at a major international airshow. The airplane is specially marked with decals prominently featuring Mount Fuji and cherry blossoms, two iconic symbols of Japan.

The Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner is the second member of the 787 family of super-efficient airplanes with new passenger-pleasing features. The 787-9 flies more passengers and cargo farther with the same exceptional environmental efficiency: 20 percent less fuel use and 20 percent fewer emissions than the airplanes they replace.

Through June 2016, 571 orders have been placed for the 787-9 by 38 customers worldwide. This airplane, scheduled to deliver later this month, will become ANA’s 13th 787-9, and the 49th member of ANA’s 787 fleet. ANA is the largest operator of the 787 Dreamliner. For further information please visit: http://www.boeing.com/commercial/787

Source: Boeing

Alaska Flies on Gevo’s Renewable Alcohol to Jet Fuel

Biofuel-powered flights demonstrate new, scalable aviation fuel alternative

Seattle, June 7, 2016: The skies became a little greener today after two Alaska Airlines jets departed the Emerald City (Seattle) fueled by the first alcohol-to-jet fuel (ATJ) made from sustainable U.S. corn. The two Alaska Airlines flights departed today with Gevo, Inc.  fuel and flew from Seattle to San Francisco International Airport and Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.

“Alaska is committed to doing its part to reduce its carbon emissions. Advancing the use of alternative jet fuels is a key part of our emission reduction strategy,” said Joseph Sprague, Alaska Airlines’ senior vice president of communications and external relations. “Gevo’s jet fuel product is an important step forward, in that it has the potential to be scalable and cost effective, without sacrificing performance.”
While the 1,500 gallons of biofuel used on these flights have a minimal impact to Alaska Airlines’ overall greenhouse gas emissions, if the airline were able to replace 20 percent of its entire fuel supply at Sea-Tac Airport, it would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 142,000 metric tons of CO2. This is equivalent to taking approximately 30,000 passenger vehicles off the road for one year.

Alaska estimates the 20 percent biofuel blend it is using for the two flights will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by an estimated 50 percent. The demonstration flights mark the first biofuel produced from a new feedstock to be certified and approved by ASTM International, the industry’s fuel standards association, since 2011. Additionally, today’s flights are a successful step toward the production of new fuels that will help airlines to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. Gevo’s production process converts bio-based isobutanol into an alcohol-to-jet synthetic paraffinic kerosene (ATJ-SPK) fuel.

When compared to other fuel options, Gevo believes that its renewable ATJ has the potential to offer benefits to operating cost, capital cost, feedstock availability and scalability, and will translate across geographies.
“Flying a commercial flight with our ATJ made from renewable resources has been a vision of ours for many years, and it has taken many years of work to get this far,” said Gevo CEO Pat Gruber. “We believe our technology has the potential to be the lowest cost, renewable carbon-based jet fuel, given the efficiency of our technology. We look forward to moving forward with Alaska, and others in the airline industry, to make renewable jet fuel widely successful as a product that substitutes for fossil fuels, and ultimately helps to reduce carbon emissions.”

Renewable fuel

The renewable fuel is made from sustainable corn grown and harvested by farmers who incorporate sustainable best practices from seed to harvest, including David Kolsrud of The Funding Farm. Using advanced farming techniques to maximize corn production and minimize the use of water, fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides, Kolsrud began low carbon farming at his farm in Brandon, South Dakota in 2010. “I grow non-edible field corn and sell it to Gevo, which separates the nutritional protein portion of the corn for animal feed and then converts the starch from the kernel to isobutanol, which is then converted to jet fuel,” said Kolsrud. “This practice is a game-changer for traditional farmers like me, as this allows us to extend the use of our crop and create new jobs that frankly didn’t exist six years ago.”

Alaska Airlines has been a leader in seeking more sustainable fuels and these flights are part of the company’s long-term commitment to its sustainability strategy. The Seattle-based company was the first U.S. airline to fly multiple commercial passenger flights using a biofuel from used cooking oil. The carrier flew 75 flights between Seattle and Washington, D.C. and Seattle and Portland in November 2011.

Additionally, Alaska Airlines is teaming up with the Washington State University-led Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance (NARA) to advance the production and use of alternative jet fuel made from forest residuals, the tree limbs and branches that remain after a forest harvest. In the coming months, Alaska will fly a demonstration flight using 1,000 gallons of Gevo’s ATJ being produced by the NARA team and its many partners.

Alaska

Alaska has set an ambitious goal of using sustainable aviation biofuel on all flights at one or more of its primary airports by 2020. In a step toward meeting this milestone, Alaska is collaborating with Boeing and the Port of Seattle on a Biofuel Infrastructure Feasibility Study for Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Read more about Alaska’s sustainability efforts at alaskaair.com/sustainability.

Source: Alaska Airlines

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