Swedavia launches electric aviation strategy – Åre Östersund ready for first electric aircraft in autumn 2020

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

2020-02-14, kl. 09:29

Swedavia has adopted a strategy for electric aviation. The goal is to enable all ten Swedavia airports to handle electric aircraft and to be able to place the first commercial electrified route in service by around 2025. At Åre Östersund Airport, a testing venue for electric aircraft is planned to be put into operation during the autumn.

The investment in electric aviation is another step in Swedavia’s work to promote the changeover to fossil-free domestic air transport in Sweden by 2030 and fossil-free air transport for all flights originating in the country by 2045. For many years, Swedavia has been carrying out work to increase the use of sustainable bio jet fuel.

“Bio jet fuel is critical in a short-term perspective for driving the aviation industry’s transformation in the face of climate change. But in the long term, electrification can also play a key role. Swedavia wants to take an active part at an early stage of this development and get an understanding of the conditions needed for electric aviation from an infrastructure perspective,” says Jonas Abrahamsson, Swedavia’s president and CEO.

A testing venue for electric aircraft is planned to be put into operation at Åre Östersund Airport during the autumn, at which time it will be possible to receive the first electric aircraft. Planning is currently under way for aircraft parking stands, infrastructure for charging aircraft and the power supply needed at the airport and to ensure the necessary permits.

Test flights of electric aircraft and drones will be carried out in the airspace between Åre Östersund and Røros Airport in Norway in collaboration with a number of partners both in Sweden and Norway under the framework for the EU project Green Flyway.

“We believe there is good potential for the first commercial electrified route in Sweden within five years. In the longer term, the electrification of routes can be an important addition to today’s scheduled traffic, primarily domestic flights. But electric air transport can also lead to brand-new routes between regional centres, which would benefit access and regional growth as well as create a whole new business model for air transport,” says Jonas Abrahamsson.

In the long term, all ten Swedavia airports will provide infrastructure for handling electric aircraft. In addition to Åre Östersund, Umeå Airport and Visby Airport are in the initial stages of developing electric aviation. Among other measures, Umeå Airport is taking part in a project to consider the possibilities of electrified flights between Sweden and Finland.

“Given the possibilities, Swedavia welcomes the Swedish government’s new initiative to study suitable measures to accelerate the introduction of electric aviation and the changeover to fossil-free air transport, which can contribute to Sweden’s access and to regional development throughout the country,” says Jonas Abrahamsson.

For many years, Swedavia has carried out ambitious sustainability work. All ten of its airports will have zero emissions of fossil carbon dioxide from their own operations by the end of 2020. Swedavia also works actively to promote the industry’s transition to bio fuel and has the goal that five per cent of all fuel used to refuel aircraft at Swedish airports shall be fossil-free by 2025.Since 2016, Swedavia purchases bio jet fuel equivalent to the amount used for the company’s flights for business purposes, about 450 tonnes of fuel a year.

For further information, please contact Swedavia’s press office at tel. +46 8 10-109 01 00 or press@swedavia.se.

Source: Swedavia

BRITISH AIRWAYS TRIALS 3D PRINTING TO IMPROVE PUNCTUALITY AND REDUCE EMISSIONS

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WINDOWS, TRAY TABLES AND EVEN PLANES – BRITISH AIRWAYS TRIALS 3D PRINTING TO IMPROVE PUNCTUALITY AND REDUCE EMISSIONS CAUSED BY FLYING SPARE PARTS AROUND THE WORLD

December 09, 2019
  • British Airways’ tech experts say the possibilities for 3D printing in aviation are limitless and share predictions of how 3D printers could transform the industry
  • In the future machines could routinely be used to create aircraft parts, reducing delays for customers
  • Initiative is part of airline’s flightpath to net zero carbon emissions by 2050

British Airways is exploring the possibility of using 3D printers to create aircraft parts in the future. These printers would be located at airports around the world to reduce delays for customers and emissions caused by transporting items.

The airline’s innovators predict that non-essential cabin parts will be first on the list to be generated, including pieces of tray tables, entertainment systems and toilets. While these components do not impact the safe operation of the flight, they can reduce the number of seats or toilets available for customers and cause delays as engineers wait for the parts to be flown to wherever the aircraft is.

Ricardo Vidal, Head of Innovation at British Airways, says this area of technology has never been more important to ensure sustainability and a seamless travel experience:  “We work with start-ups and innovation partners from around the world to explore and implement the very latest technologies, from artificial intelligence to speed up turnaround times to biometrics, helping us to deliver a seamless airport experience for customers. 3D printing is yet another advancement that will keep us at the forefront of airline innovation.”

3D printing is an essential step towards the sustainable future of aviation, as the printers can produce parts that, while as strong and durable as traditional components, weigh up to 55 per cent less. Every kilogram removed saves up to 25 tons of CO2 emissions during the lifespan of an aircraft.

British Airways’ exploration of 3D printing follows the airline’s BA2119: Flight of the Future programme in celebration of it’s centenary. It’s research into the future of the customer experience suggested that within the next decade, biological scanners gathering travellers’ physiological and nutritional needs could suggest food and drink to meet individual requirements and print these on board the aircraft. In addition, the research predicts that jet lag could become be a thing of the past, with 3D printers producing personalised health supplements.

British Airways’ top ten predictions for how 3D printing could be used by airline’s in the future:

1.                   Cutlery

2.                   Products for amenity kits, such as toothbrushes or combs

3.                   Tray tables

4.                   Aircraft windows

5.                   Inflight entertainment screens

6.                   Seats

7.                   Baggage containers

8.                   Circuit boards for electrical components

9.                   Flight deck switches

10.                 Aircraft shells

Source: British Airways

AIR FRANCE PLANS FLIGHTS FROM SAN FRANCISCO FUELED WITH SUSTAINABLE AVIATION FUEL

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Air France and Shell have signed a memorandum of understanding signaling their intent to fuel flights from San Francisco International Airport using a blend of conventional and sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) with effect from 1 June 2020.

This collaboration between Air France, World Energy, and Shell exemplifies what the industry needs; a supply of SAF that is mature enough to be integrated into airlines’ daily operations.The SAF is notably made from inedible waste fats and oils. This RSB-certified alternative fuel meets strict sustainability standards and can be delivered via the airport’s hydrant system. The airline anticipates that this initiative will help save approximately 6,000 tons of CO2 over a period of 16 months.Air France has long advocated the creation of a viable sustainable aviation fuel sector. A pioneer in its use on commercial flights, Air France first initiated experiments as early as 2014 and has since heavily invested in innovation, working hand-in-hand with researchers.

This is another example of the airline’s commitment to reducing its environmental footprint at every step of the value chain. Its sustainable development agenda for 2030 involves cutting CO2emissions by 50%, which Air France notably aims to achieve by investing in fuel-efficient aircraft.

Anne Rigail, CEO of Air France: “Sustainable Aviation fuels are integral to our sustainability approach. They constitute an immediate concrete response to our environmental challenges and we must encourage their production. This initiative in California demonstrates that when states set up incentive mechanisms, production picks up and airlines are given the means to take action. We as a community must look at this as an example and duplicate it around the world, notably at home, in France.”

Anna Mascolo, Vice President Shell Aviation: “Along with new technologies and offsets, sustainable aviation fuels have a huge role to play in reducing emissions from air travel. With urgent action and industry collaboration it is possible to fly and emit less. However, we are still at the beginning of the journey with significant opportunity to increase the supply of sustainable aviation fuel and replicate successes such as this globally. At Shell we are committed to working with the industry towards a more sustainable aviation industry. Commitments like this from Air France can only help accelerate this journey, giving producers the assurance to invest in building refinery capacity and enabling us to develop the supply infrastructure required.”

Bryan Sherbacow, Chief Commercial Officer, World Energy: “We are proud to enable Air France and Shell to deliver a low-carbon fuel solution to their aviation customers. The route to widespread availability and use of sustainable aviation fuel is awareness and supportive policy similar to that of California. This important collaboration elevates visibility with both international consumers and legislators.”

Source: Air France

SAS JOINS NORDIC INITIATIVE FOR ELECTRIC AVIATION

SAS joins Nordic initiative for electric aviation

A Nordic initiative to drive the development of electric aircraft is now being launched. Funded by Nordic Innovation (an organization under the Nordic Council of Ministers), a platform is created where SAS together with other Nordic players gather.

“We will be a Nordic network that works with both infrastructure, industry issues and new business models,” says Maria Fiskerud, project manager for The Nordic Network for Electric Aviation (NEA).

The NEA network will organize workshops and other events to build knowledge and cooperation in the Nordic countries. At present, the network has eleven members (Air Greenland, Avinor, Braathens Regional Airlines, El-fly AS, Finnair, Heart Aerospace, Iceland Air, NISA (Nordic Innovation Sustainable Aviation), RISE, SAS and Swedavia).

“The transition to sustainable air travel is existential to us and the aviation industry. Therefore, it is vital to exchange knowledge with other stakeholders to gain speed in the development of electric aircraft for commercial use. We have high ambitions for our sustainability work and we already collaborate with Airbus, among others, regarding the electrification of aviation,” says Lars Andersen Resare, Head of Environment and CSR at SAS.

A Nordic initiative to drive the development of electric aircraft is now being launched. Funded by Nordic Innovation (an organization under the Nordic Council of Ministers), a platform is created where SAS together with other Nordic players gather.

There are four focus areas with clear objectives for driving the growth of electric aircraft: to Standardize electric air infrastructure in the Nordic countries, to Develop business models for regional point-to-point connectivity between Nordic countries, to Develop aircraft technology for Nordic weather conditions, and to Create a platform for European and global collaborations.

Source: SAS

Quantum Signs for 26 Electric Airplanes from Bye Aerospace

electric airplanes

DENVER, Col. – August 21, 2019 – Bye Aerospace announced that Quantum Air has signed a purchase deposit agreement for 22 of its all-electric four-seat eFlyer 4s and 2 two-seat eFlyer 2 airplanes. The company also signed a comprehensive agreement that includes two future advanced aircraft under development from Bye Aerospace.

George E. Bye, CEO of Bye Aerospace, welcomed Los Angeles-based Quantum Air to the growing list of Bye Aerospace customers. “One of Quantum Air’s goals is to disrupt aviation, providing more accessible, cost-efficient, high speed air transportation solutions — including FAA Part 135 on-demand air taxi travel— to help alleviate the noise and CO2 emissions challenges that accompany traditional internal combustion aircraft,” he said.

Quantum’s new fleet of eFlyers cements its status as the first and leading air taxi service in Los Angeles. “With the arrival of electric aircraft, we are entering a new Golden Age in aviation,” said Tony Thompson, Quantum CEO. “Since the dawn of flight, point to point air travel has been a luxury available only to a privileged few. Quantum’s groundbreaking air taxi service will finally make point to point air travel widely available.”

“The future has arrived,” added Scott Akina, Quantum’s Vice President and Chief Pilot. “By electrifying aviation, Quantum will ignite urban and regional mobility. Electric aircraft are safer, quieter, and more efficient than legacy aircraft, and they are more fun, more comfortable, and do not pollute.”

In addition, Bye will join Quantum’s board of advisers. According to Thompson: “With George Bye on our board of advisers, Quantum will tightly integrate with Bye Aerospace, producing a superior flight experience for our customers.”

electric airplanes

Bye Aerospace is developing the FAA FAR 23-certified family of eFlyer general aviation aircraft, starting with the eFlyer 2, for the flight training mission. All of Bye Aerospace’s current and future families of aircraft, including the eFlyer 2 and the eFlyer 4, feature exemplary engineering, research, and electric aircraft solutions producing no CO2, and are designed to answer compelling market needs. These include significantly lower operating costs, zero emissions, and decreased noise.

Source: Bye Aerospace

Dublin Airport’s Electric Vehicle Strategy Takes Off

Sustainable Aviation

July 17, 2019

Dublin Airport has a target to convert its existing fleet of 111 vehicles to Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) over the next five years.

The move to LEVs is part of the airport’s overall sustainability strategy which includes targets based around carbon, energy, waste, water and the fleet of vehicles used on the airport campus. These initiatives will deliver a range of immediate benefits to those that work at the airport and to local communities.

The benefits include improvements in air quality, a reduction in noise and carbon emissions and further savings in airport energy consumption.

Some areas of Dublin Airport’s operation require specialist four-wheel drive vehicles. A recently developed plug-in, hybrid replacement for four-wheel drives that were traditionally powered by two-litre diesel engines has allowed the airport to convert vehicles across its operation.

“Our licence to grow Dublin Airport is predicated on operating in a sustainable manner and we take our responsibilities in this regard very seriously,” said Dublin Airport Managing Director Vincent Harrison.

“Using low-emission vehicles is another great step in achieving our sustainability targets and being an exemplar to other airports and organisations in Ireland and across the world. Our fleet management team continually monitor the developing LEV market to identify appropriate vehicles that can replace existing vehicles in line with our vehicle maintenance strategies,” Harrison added.

Teams across the airport recently took delivery of six low-emission vehicles with two more due for delivery in the coming months. Around 20% of the airport’s vehicle fleet have now been upgraded to Low Emission Vehicles (LEVs) and a further 5% are Hybrid vehicles.

Dublin Airport also aims to convert its bus operations to a low emission vehicle fleet by 2022. Trials of electric buses took place on the campus earlier this year in association with Aircoach.

The LEV strategy is part of daa’s overall Sustainability Strategy. Further details are available Opens in new windowhere.

In the last five years, Dublin Airport has reduced its primary energy consumption by a cumulative value of 9,285,011kWh. This is equivalent to the average yearly usage of about 450-500 standard semi-detached houses. In the last ten years, water consumption per passenger has reduced by 26.8 litres. That’s the equivalent of filling almost 10 million baths.

Dublin Airport supports 117,300 jobs in the Irish economy, including 19,200 people employed directly at the airport and its environs. The economic activity underpinned by Dublin Airport in terms of the spin-off benefits through trade, tourism, and jobs is worth €8.3 billion to the Irish economy annually.

Sustainable Aviation

Image: Myles Reilly, Airside Delivery Manager, Owen Hickey, Airside Training Instructor, Catherine Fox, Passenger Screening Supervisor, Siobhán Bisset, Vehicle Control Posts Assistant Manager, Joe Roche, Airfield Systems Manager, Seán McKessy, Airfield Supervisor and Darren McAtamney, Heavy Fleet and Logistics Engineer pictured with some of Dublin Airport’s LEV fleet.

Ampaire Announces First Public Electric Flight

IASA - sustainable aviation

The Highest-Capacity Electric Aircraft Ever Flown Held First Public Test Flight in the Skies Above Southern California on Thursday, Paving the Way for Ampaire Inc. to Have Regular Commercial Service for Passengers and Cargo as Soon as 2021

Aviation Company Ampaire, Inc., Helps Further Cement Los Angeles as the Center of Innovation on Transportation Electrification

Camarillo, California, June 6, 2019​.

Ampaire, Inc. has moved the aviation industry a major step forward with the test flight of the Ampaire 337, the highest-capacity hybrid-electric aircraft ever flown. On Thursday, June 6, Ampaire engineers, investors and journalists witnessed the hybrid-electric Ampaire 337 fly in the skies above Camarillo Airport.

This is a significant step for aviation because never before has a hybrid-electric aircraft this large flown. Ampaire’s 337 is built with a direct path towards commercialization—moving electric aviation firmly from futuristic to attainable.

The aircraft, based on the six-seat Cessna 337 Skymaster, was retrofitted with Ampaire’s proprietary electric propulsion system and is powered by a lightweight battery system. The battery-powered electric motor replaces a combustion engine of the aircraft’s original two-engine configuration, and the resulting system is a ‘parallel hybrid’, meaning the internal combustion engine and electric motor work in concert to optimize power output as the plane flies. In hybrid configuration, the aircraft sees significant greenhouse gas emissions savings and operating cost reductions. The experimental plane was flown by a test pilot and flight engineer.

“The first flight of Ampaire’s electric passenger aircraft is a huge step forward for aviation,” said ​Deborah Flint, CEO of Los Angeles World Airports. ​“As a cleantech company that was started in our great city as part of LACI, Ampaire’s incredible achievement further cements Los Angeles as the leader in transportation electrification and technology innovation.”

“Imagine that in just a few years you will be able to buy a ticket for a flight that is clean, quiet and inexpensive,” said ​Kevin Noertker, CEO of Ampaire​. “Ampaire is proud to lead the aviation industry in transportation electrification, and we recognize the importance of electric aviation for climate change and community connectivity.”

“Given the urgency of the climate crisis, today’s historic flight not only signifies a huge step forward for aviation, it also shines a light on Los Angeles’s leadership in transportation electrification,” said ​Matt Petersen, CEO of the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI).​ “That’s why I’m so excited for the Ampaire team for their first hybrid-electric flight—as a ​LACI​ portfolio company, Ampaire and their Ampaire 337 flight test program further proves that Los Angeles is a cleantech hub that attracts investment and game-changing innovation for climate solutions.”

“Flight is becoming electric and this is the most incredible team to make that happen! Ampaire’s approach is one of the many reasons we chose to support them through ​our accelerator program​,” said ​Van Espahbodi, Co-Founder and Managing Director of Starburst Accelerator.​ “We see tremendous potential in their business model, and we’re excited to see them achieve this significant technical milestone.”

Aircraft are a significant contributor to both ​local and global emissions​. Electric and hybrid-electric aircraft will reduce GHG emissions and air pollution even as more and more goods and people fly. In addition, electric aircraft are quieter, more efficient and cost much less to fly and maintain connecting communities, making skies quieter.

Ampaire has mapped a clear path from today’s first test flight of a prototype to commercial operations in 2021. Thursday’s test flight follows the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) May 2019 airworthiness approval to begin a flight test program. The test flights will see the aircraft fly multiple times per week from June through August 2019 and will gather data about the electric propulsion performance characteristics.

In late 2019, Ampaire will begin a ​pilot project​ on a commercial route on the Hawaiian island of Maui. The aircraft will be a newly retrofitted Cessna 337 built with learnings from the test flight program that inform the configuration of the battery and motor. This aircraft will be a pre-production prototype and will move Ampaire closer to commercial readiness.

sustainable aviation

Ampaire’s focus is on supplying aircraft to regional airlines— who typically fly short-haul—often serving remote communities and island regions. In addition to the upcoming pilot project in Maui, Ampaire is also in collaboration with Vieques Air Link (VAL), a regional airline in Puerto Rico, to ​establish a pilot project in the region​. Alongside Mokulele Airlines and VAL, Ampaire has signed Letters of Interest with 14 other airlines across the world.

About Ampaire

Ampaire is leading the charge in aircraft electrification. The Los Angeles based company is on a mission to be the world’s most trusted developer of practical and compelling electric aircraft. To start, Ampaire is retrofitting existing passenger aircraft to electric. It’s the leanest, fastest, most capital efficient approach to making commercial electric air travel a reality. As a LACI portfolio company, Ampaire has its roots in Los Angeles. Ampaire’s vision is to make flights more accessible to more people from more airports by providing electric aircraft that are safe, clean, quiet, and less costly to operate.

Source: Ampaire

Harbour Air and magniX Partner to Build World’s First All-Electric Airline

IASA - Sustainable Aviation

Aviation Leaders Set to Transform Seaplanes into ePlanes — a Zero-emission Aircraft for the Future

REDMOND, WA and VANCOUVER, B.C. – March 26, 2019 – magniX, the company powering the electric aviation revolution, and Harbour Air, North America’s largest seaplane airline, today announced a partnership to transform Harbour Air seaplanes into an all-electric commercial fleet powered by the magni500, a 750 horsepower (HP) all-electric motor.

Operating 12 routes between hubs like Seattle and Vancouver and across the pristine natural wilderness of the Pacific Northwest, Harbour Air welcomes more than 500,000 passengers on 30,000 commercial flights each year. Through this partnership, both companies are furthering the vision to someday connect communities with clean, efficient and affordable electric air travel.

“Harbour Air first demonstrated its commitment to sustainability by becoming the first fully carbon-neutral airline in North America in 2007, through the purchase of carbon offsets,” said Greg McDougall, founder and CEO of Harbour Air Seaplanes. “Through our commitment to making a positive impact on people’s lives, the communities where we operate and the environment, we are once again pushing the boundaries of aviation by becoming the first commercial aircraft to be powered by electric propulsion. We are excited to bring commercial electric aviation to the Pacific Northwest, turning our seaplanes into ePlanes.”

The aviation industry currently contributes 12 percent of all U.S. carbon emissions and 4.9 percent globally, all while providing few low-cost, fuel-efficient options for passenger flights under 1,000 miles. By modifying existing Harbour Air planes with innovative, all-electric magniX propulsion systems, the partnership will create the world’s first completely electric commercial seaplane fleet. A Harbour Air ePlane will have zero reliance on fossil fuels and produce zero emissions – a significant step forward in the innovation and advancement of the airline industry.

“In 2018, 75 percent of worldwide airline flights were 1,000 miles or less in range. With magniX’s new propulsion systems coupled with emerging battery capabilities, we see tremendous potential for electric aviation to transform this heavily trafficked ‘middle mile’ range,” said Roei Ganzarski, CEO of magniX. “We’re excited to partner with Harbour Air, a forward thinking, like-minded company that is dedicated to bringing environmentally conscious, cost effective air-transport solutions to the West Coast of North America. This partnership will set the standard for the future of commercial aviation operators.”

IASA - Sustainable Aviation

The first aircraft to be converted will be the DHC-2 de Havilland Beaver, a six-passenger commercial aircraft used across Harbour Air’s route network. Harbour Air and magniX expect to conduct first flight tests of the all-electric aircraft in late 2019.

This partnership follows significant milestones for both companies, including the successful testing of magniX’s 350 HP all-electric motor and the addition of a Vancouver to Seattle route in Harbour Air’s destination roster.

Source: Harbour Air

IASA participates in ANIMA Project

IASA e.V. - Sustainable Aviation

ANIMA Project invites IASA e.V. expert to join Expert Committee

IASA e.V. Airport Sustainable Development Expert Dr. Axel Laistner has been asked to participate on the “Impact and Balanced Approach Impact Expert Committee” of the ANIMA (Aviation Noise Impact Management through Novel Approaches) research project within the EU Horizon 2020 program.

The expertise of IASA e.V. regarding sustainable solutions and methods in aviation will therefore be part of the balanced approach validation process of ANIMA.

IASA e.V. - Sustainable Aviation

Picture by ANIMA

Hi Fly leads the world with plastic-free trial flight

HiFly

26 December 2018

In a global first for the airline industry, and a defining moment for the sustainability of the planet, wet-lease carrier Hi Fly is poised to make the first-ever jet-age passenger flight with not a single-use plastic item on board.

The ‘plastics-free’ trial, involving four flights by Hi Fly’s wide-body Airbus A340, 9H-SUN, will jet into the history books for the first time on December 26th, when it takes off from Lisbon on its way to Natal in Brazil.

The first flight will be full with holidaymakers looking to Samba-dance their way out of 2018. It will return to Lisbon, this time with Brazilian passengers looking to welcome in the New Year Portuguese style. The revellers will then make the return journey home a week later. Over 700 passengers will take part in the trial.

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Commenting ahead of the take-off, Hi Fly President Paulo Mirpuri said: “This historic Hi Fly flight, without any single-use plastic items on board, underlines our commitment to making Hi Fly the world’s first ‘plastics-free’ airline within 12 months.

“We take that commitment very seriously.”

Also speaking prior to the flight, he added: “We are obviously excited and delighted that Hi Fly will be the first airline to attempt such a feat.

“Our corporate mission is based around sustainability and we work hand in glove with the Mirpuri Foundation to make sure that our corporate practices match our wider responsibilities to the planet.

“The test flights will prevent around 350 KG of single-use, virtually indestructible plastics from poisoning our environment.

“Over 100,000 flights take off each day around the world and, last year, commercial aircraft carried nearly four billion passengers. This number is expected to double again in less than 20 years. So, the potential to make a difference here is clearly enormous.

The test flights will help us trial the many substitute items we have developed and introduced them, in a real-world environment.

“We know we may encounter some initial teething problems, but we are confident of addressing these over the coming months.

“We know, too, from the feedback we have received from client airlines and passengers, that it’s the right thing for the airline to be doing.”

Pedro Ramos, the Director-General of Tour operator Alto Astral, the company who chartered the flights between Lisbon and Brazil, spoke of his company’s delight at being a participant in this key industry event.

“Everyone at Alto Astral is excited to be involved in this adventure and we believe that future generations will thank those of us who have been prepared to stand up to try to make a difference now.

“Hi Fly has long been the leader in the field of corporate environmental responsibility and sustainability, and they have rightly identified, as a key objective, the early elimination of plastics pollution. It’s been great for us to see how, in practical terms, they have gone about replacing so much in order to kick-start this elimination process.

“All together for a better world, we say.”

The plastics-free test flight is just the latest move by Hi Fly to make its entire fleet ‘plastics free’ by the end of 2019.

Among the scores of single-use plastic items that have been replaced are: cups, spoons, salt and pepper shakers, sick bags, packaging for bedding, dishes, individual butter pots, soft drink bottles and toothbrushes.

And among the many innovations presented to passengers on the flight, by the Hi Fly environmental experts, will be bamboo cutlery, an array of paper packaging, and containers that, once used, can be readily composted.

Source: HiFly

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