Upcoming report on EU climate action – support for carbon capture and innovative renewables

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation
19/10/2018

On Tuesday 23 October 2018, the European Court of Auditors (ECA) will publish a special report on the effectiveness of EU funding to support commercial deployment of carbon capture and storage and innovative renewables.

ABOUT THE AUDIT
The ECA examined the design, management and coordination of the two dedicated EU funding programs worth almost €4 billion. The auditors assessed whether they made the progress expected in helping carbon capture and innovative renewables advance towards commercial deployment. They carried out audit visits to five Member States: Germany, Spain, the Netherlands, Poland and the United Kingdom.
The report is expected to warn against poor achievements of EU support in terms of projects and results. The auditors are expected to single out the uncertainties in policies and rules as well as a lack of clear accountability and control. They will make a number of recommendations for improving the EU’s approach in view of the Innovation Fund to be launched in 2021.
ABOUT THE TOPIC
The EU climate and energy package for 2020 required an increased use and development of renewable energy sources and low carbon technologies. In 2009, the EU launched the European Energy Programme for Recovery with a budget of €1.6 billion to support carbon capture storage and offshore wind projects. At the same time, the EU created the New Entrants’ Reserve 300 funded by the sale of 300 million emission allowances (€2.1 billion). Both programmes set ambitious targets for carbon capture and storage and innovative renewable energy projects.

The ECA’s special reports set out the results of its audits of EU policies and programmes or management topics related to specific budgetary areas. The ECA selects and designs these audit tasks to be of maximum impact by considering the risks to performance or compliance, the level of income or spending involved, forthcoming developments and political and public interest.

Source: EUROPEAN COURT OF AUDITORS

Boeing, SAA and Mango Celebrate Africa’s First Commercial Flights with Sustainable Aviation Biofuel

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

‘Southern Africa Sustainable Fuels Initiative’ launched to ensure sustainable aviation biofuel supply

Johannesburg, July 15, 2016: Boeing, South African Airways (SAA) and low-cost carrier Mango today celebrated Africa’s first passenger flights with sustainable aviation biofuel. The flights coincided with Boeing’s 100th anniversary and centennial celebrations worldwide.

The SAA and Mango flights carried 300 passengers from Johannesburg to Cape Town on Boeing 737-800s using a blend of 30 percent aviation biofuel produced from Sunchem’s nicotine-free tobacco plant Solaris, refined by AltAir Fuels and supplied by SkyNRG.

“SAA is committed to a sustainable future and this flight highlights the bold steps we are taking to protect and preserve our environment while creating opportunities for the economic development of our people,” said Musa Zwane, acting CEO of SAA. “We are pleased to join the ranks of global airlines who have made a commitment to a better and cleaner way of flying.”

“It is fitting that on our 100 year anniversary we are flying on fuels ‎that not only power the flight, but ensure a sustainable future for our industry,” said Miguel Santos, managing director for Africa, Boeing International. “This project is a great example of environmental stewardship that delivers economic and health benefits to South Africa.”

Fuels collaboration

In 2013, Boeing and SAA launched their sustainable aviation fuels collaboration and in 2014, Project Solaris became the first focus project that converted oil from the Solaris plant seed into bio-jet fuel. In 2015, farms in Limpopo Province of South Africa, from which the biofuel for today’s flights was sourced, achieved certification from the Roundtable on Sustainable Biomaterials (RSB), one of the strongest sustainability standards in the world. RSB certification provides a model for expansion of Project Solaris to larger scale production. The initiative also focuses on South Africa’s goals for public health, rural development and economic and employment opportunities for farmers by increasing production of Solaris and other feedstocks on under-utilized land.

The partners also launched a stakeholder and sustainability plan called the Southern Africa Sustainable Fuel Initiative (SASFI) to ensure a long-term domestic fuel supply for SAA and other regional fuel users. The goal is to scale-up over the next several years to gain additional biofuel capacity. If successful, farmers will be able to tap into local and global demand for certified feedstock without adverse impact to food supplies, fresh water or land use.

Studies have shown that sustainably produced aviation biofuel emits 50 to 80 percent lower carbon emissions through its life cycle than fossil jet fuel. Airlines around the world have conducted more than 2,500 passenger flights using various forms of aviation biofuel since it was approved for commercial use in 2011.

Boeing is the industry leader in global efforts to develop and commercialize sustainable aviation biofuel. In addition to its collaboration in Southern Africa, Boeing has active biofuel development projects in the United States, Middle East, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, Brazil and Australia. For more information, visit www.boeing.com/environment.

Source: Boeing

Neste: 4 Reasons Why the World Needs Biofuels

IASA: Nachhaltige Luftfahrt - Sustainable Aviation

Keilaranta, Finland, July 12, 2016: Neste, a pioneer in oil refining and renewable solutions and the world’s leading producer of renewable diesel, published today a statement explaining the company’s view on the world’s need  for biofuels.

Reason 1: Combating climate change

Combating climate change forces the world to seek alternative, low-carbon sources of energy and fuel. Since traffic is one of the largest sources of greenhouse gas, i.e. carbon emissions (CO2), substituting fossil fuels with renewable alternatives such as biofuels is an efficient way to reduce these emissions. Biofuels offer a solution to reduce carbon emissions of traffic when other solutions, such as switching to electric vehicles, is not an option due to high vehicle costs or lack of vehicle charging network, for example.

Reason 2: Responding to higher energy consumption

The expected increase in world population to 8 or even 10.5 billion by 2050, combined with significant economic growth in emerging economies will result in substantially increasing energy consumption. To be able to respond to this growing demand, we need to use natural resources more efficiently and increase the use of renewable energy, such as biofuels.

Reason 3: Securing energy supply

Increasing energy demand will pose challenges to security of supply as resources are scattered around the globe. Biofuels help to enhance and safeguard energy security by reducing the world’s reliance on fossil energy sources. Biomass is a resource that is more evenly distributed globally.

Reason 4: Making the most of scarce resources

Using waste and residue as raw materials for biofuels is an excellent example of answering to the needs of a circular economy. Reducing the amount of waste and making the most of our valuable natural resources is crucial for our future survival.

Source: Neste

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